throwback week



Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21
  1. #1
    Rampage39 Guest

    Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    Sean McCormick and Doug Farrar / FootballOutsiders.com
    Posted: 5 hours ago

    http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/5590920

    The Rams draft is a good example of a team drafting with an eye towards, both its current roster construction and its offensive and defensive systems rather than simply grabbing the top rated player each time out. As a result, their draft does not grade out well on the draft boards, even though the players taken may well be effective in their roles. Only one of the Rams' ten selections graded out as a steal on a majority of the boards, and four of them were universally graded as major reaches. Tye Hill does not have the size of Jimmy Williams or Jason Allen, but he has none of the red flags that accompany those two players. Moreover, he has the natural size and skill set to contribute immediately as a nickel back, thus addressing a need. It's possible that in three years the team would be better off with a bigger corner on the outside, or someone with the skill set to match up with Vernon Davis, but in the short term Hill figures to see the field a lot in nickel and dime packages.

    The Rams decision to repeatedly attack the tight end position was a direct result of a change in offensive philosophy. Mike Martz did not utilize the position much, but the tight end is a major part of Scott Linehan's offense, so the team felt it was necessary to radically upgrade the unit's playmaking ability. Klopfenstein and Byrd are not the all-around prospects that Leonard Pope is, but each is a superior short-area receiver. Jermaine Wiggins caught 80 balls in the Linehan offense two years ago, and the tight ends St. Louis ultimately chose fit that profile. It's entirely understandable that teams target players to fit their systems, but in order for the strategy to pay off long-term, you need to have coaching stability; otherwise, a new coach with a new system will come in and find a roster that is less talented than it could be, and the process of rebuilding will take longer.

    According to the draft board, the Rams did a better job of attaining value on the second day of the draft than they did on the first. Dominique Byrd and Victor Adeyanju were both considered major steals by at least two draft boards, and Tim McGarigle and Mark Setterstrom were considered good value as well. At a point in the draft when many teams are taking players who grade out as unrestricted free agents, the Rams were signing guys who were considered draftable. Look for both players to make the final roster or to end up on the team's practice squad.

    Recent free agent moves

    On April 30, St. Louis traded TE Brandon Manumaleuna to the Chargers for a fourth-round pick, using that selection to draft Victor Adeyanju.

    Remaining team needs

    Hill, a potential first-year playmaker, makes the paucity of talent in the secondary a far less pressing issue. The Rams are hoping that Wroten's off-field problems will a.) Allow them, in retrospect, to have grabbed a first-round talent in the third; and b.) Disappear with his ascent into the big leagues. History is not on Wroten's side the NFL tends to make you more of what you were before but if he bucks the odds, he has the kind of explosion off the snap needed by St. Louis in their interior line.

    Undrafted free agents of note

    Among the Rams' UDFAs are UConn basketball player Ed Nelson, who aspires to join the ever-increasing number of hardwood-to-gridiron TE converts, and Morehouse College grad John David Washington. Washington is his school's all-time leading rusher, but that's not why he's getting a remarkable amount of press for a Division II player his father is actor Denzel Washington. The elder Washington played one season at Fordham before moving on to far greener


  2. #2
    Drew4EverRams Guest

    Re: Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    I think the NFC West is gonna suprise a lot of people this year,there seems to me to have been a lot of talent brought into the division thro FA and the Draft and i think its a 3 way fight for the NFC West title with the 40whiners the team to make the difference by causing a upset or two alone the way that will decide who gets to be tops!

    Last season our record was 1-5 against NFC West rivals as opposed to when we used to walk away with the NFC West with a 5-1 if not 6-0 record!


    *please note im not predicting the whiners to be anything but bottom of our division but just saying they could play their part in deciding who are NFC West champs*

  3. #3
    RamsFan4ever's Avatar
    RamsFan4ever is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    GA
    Age
    22
    Posts
    1,346
    Rep Power
    11

    Re: Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    werent we 5-1 in our division 2 years ago?

    yea the NFC west is gonna surprise everyone

  4. #4
    Drew4EverRams Guest

    Re: Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    If you mean the 8-8(or 9-9) season i better get back to you on that,it was a season ive tried to block out of my memory,i found last season easier to handle;least we knew we werent play-off material early doors!

  5. #5
    coy bacon Guest

    Re: Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    Nice to see Doug Farrar getting some well deserved publicity.

  6. #6
    AvengerRam's Avatar
    AvengerRam is offline Moderator Emeritus
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Longwood, Florida, United States
    Age
    46
    Posts
    19,044
    Rep Power
    171

    Re: Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    Quote Originally Posted by Rampage39
    Only one of the Rams' ten selections graded out as a steal on a majority of the boards, and four of them were universally graded as major reaches.
    What a complete and utter load of crap.

    Draft boards are subjective creations of people with marginal knowledge at best. So to use terms like "graded out" as if there are objective criteria at work is laughable.

    That said, even within the confines of the subjective "draft board" analysis, more than one of the Rams picks was a "consensus draft board" bargain.

    Believe me, I read more than my share of mock drafts and draft boards, and based upon what I read, I'd say the choices "graded out" (again, a meaningless subjective term, but let's play along) as follows:

    Tye Hill - drafted where expected
    Joe Klopfenstein - drafted slightly higher than expected
    Claude Wroten - drafted much lower than expected (or slightly lower, if you factor the off-the-field issues)
    Jon Alston - drafted where expected/slightly higher than expected (close call)
    Dominique Byrd - drafted slightly lower than expected
    Victor Adeyanju - drafted much lower than expected
    Marques Hagans - drafted higher than expected
    Tim McGarigle - drafted where expected
    Mark Setterstrom - drafted where expected
    Tony Palmer - drafted where expected

    Add to that the fact that the Rams signed two UFAs who were expected to be drafted (Derogy, Raiola) and the statment that the Rams reached on nearly half of their picks is just plain silly. At worst, the Rams had three reaches out of ten picks (Klopfenstein, Altson, Hagans), and minor ones at that.

    Kind of surprised our old friend Doug would write such tripe. You would think a Seahawk fan - fresh off the Pro Bowl campaign of supposed reach Lofa Tatupu - would know better.
    Last edited by AvengerRam; -05-11-2006 at 01:07 PM.

  7. #7
    RAMMAN68's Avatar
    RAMMAN68 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,714
    Rep Power
    15

    Re: Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    Seems like we have a lot of talent, let's just hope it all comes together.
    JUST WIN ONE FOR THE FANS


    "HIT HARD, HIT FAST, AND HIT OFTEN"
    Adm. William "Bull" Halsey

  8. #8
    GameTime Guest

    Re: Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    I know this is a stretch, but the last time the St louis Cardinals had a player trying to break the home run record was the same year the Rams won the SuperBowl.
    Lets Hope Pujols hits 74.

  9. #9
    theodus69 Guest

    Re: Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    Quote Originally Posted by GameTime
    I know this is a stretch, but the last time the St louis Cardinals had a player trying to break the home run record was the same year the Rams won the SuperBowl.
    Lets Hope Pujols hits 74.
    Very interesting.........very interesting!

  10. #10
    talkstoangels61 Guest

    Re: Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    back on finally

  11. #11
    theodus69 Guest

    Re: Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    Quote Originally Posted by talkstoangels61
    back on finally
    Where you been dude?

  12. #12
    Goldenfleece's Avatar
    Goldenfleece is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Age
    33
    Posts
    3,586
    Rep Power
    60

    Re: Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    Quote Originally Posted by AvengerRam
    What a complete and utter load of crap.

    Draft boards are subjective creations of people with marginal knowledge at best. So to use terms like "graded out" as if there are objective criteria at work is laughable.

    That said, even within the confines of the subjective "draft board" analysis, more than one of the Rams picks was a "consensus draft board" bargain.
    I totally agree. Plus, you have to remember that most draft boards account for team needs, so they could have ten picks going between two players even the analysts consider comparable talents. Just looking on the "expert" draft boards to see where a player was listed and then checking how many places above or below that he was taken is a pretty feeble form of analysis. I'd say Hagans was the only player universally graded as a major reach.

  13. #13
    Nick's Avatar
    Nick is offline Superbowl MVP
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Morgantown, WV
    Age
    32
    Posts
    19,871
    Rep Power
    154

    Re: Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    Quote Originally Posted by AvengerRam
    Draft boards are subjective creations of people with marginal knowledge at best.
    Well, let's not generalize. I agree with the point you're making, but based on some of the things I've read, I think it would be a mistake to write every draft board author off as having marginal knowledge.
    ClanRam ModCast: Episode Four
    Rams Discussion Right at Your Fingertips!



  14. #14
    dfarrar777 Guest

    Re: Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    Quote Originally Posted by AvengerRam
    Kind of surprised our old friend Doug would write such tripe. You would think a Seahawk fan - fresh off the Pro Bowl campaign of supposed reach Lofa Tatupu - would know better.
    Yeouch! Well, let's clarify in a way that the article did not - I didn't write, nor do I really endorse, the parts of this article that compare a few different draft boards and endeavor to codify who was a reach and a steal using that method. My contributions to this piece were strictly the "Recent free agent moves", "Remaining team needs" and "Undrafted free agents of note" sections.

    Hopefully, this pulls me out of the Miklasz milieu. :-)

  15. #15
    txramsfan's Avatar
    txramsfan is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Poplar Bluff, MO
    Age
    50
    Posts
    7,266
    Rep Power
    65

    Re: Breaking down the drafts in the NFC West

    The Rams draft is a good example of a team drafting with an eye towards, both its current roster construction and its offensive and defensive systems rather than simply grabbing the top rated player each time out. As a result, their draft does not grade out well on the draft boards, even though the players taken may well be effective in their roles. Only one of the Rams' ten selections graded out as a steal on a majority of the boards, and four of them were universally graded as major reaches. Tye Hill does not have the size of Jimmy Williams or Jason Allen, but he has none of the red flags that accompany those two players. Moreover, he has the natural size and skill set to contribute immediately as a nickel back, thus addressing a need. It's possible that in three years the team would be better off with a bigger corner on the outside, or someone with the skill set to match up with Vernon Davis, but in the short term Hill figures to see the field a lot in nickel and dime packages.
    Well, let's give him a little credit. He did say they didn't grade out well but he also said that they should be effective in their roles.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •