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    Faulk retirement articles and comments

    Multitalented Faulk one-of-a-kind in St. Louis

    By Jeff Gordon
    ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
    03/22/2007

    Marshall Faulk is the greatest professional football player St. Louis has ever employed.

    This claim is not meant to disparage the football Cardinals, a proud franchise that sent one tremendous player after another to the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Larry Wilson, Jackie Smith, Dan Dierdorf and Roger Wehrli stand among the greatest to ever play their sport.

    It’s a shame they never had a owner who measured up.

    I don’t want to overlook contemporary Rams stars like Isaac Bruce, Torry Holt, Orlando Pace and Kurt Warner -– four other stalwarts from “The Greatest Show on Turf.” At least a couple of those Super Bowl heroes also will be enshrined in Canton, Ohio, some day.

    But Faulk was the Next Level of competition. He was one of the elite talents in NFL history, but that is just the start of his story. We’ve seen a lot of highly gifted football players come and go without making much of an impact.

    Faulk offered so much more.

    TOUGHNESS: He took a beating. He played hurt. He willed himself forward despite needing one operation after another to repair his battered knees.

    Faulk’s career highlight might have come at the end of the difficult 2000 season. With the Rams facing a must-win situation at New Orleans, his hometown, he led the Rams into the playoffs with a remarkable 220-yard, three-TD performance.

    Plowing into the teeth of the physical Saints defense, Faulk refused to let the Rams lose. He single-handedly kept his team alive.

    Faulk and his teammates couldn’t repeat that performance against the Saints in the playoffs, but his stand that afternoon was memorable.

    SMARTS: Faulk knew the “Air Martz” offense as well as Warner did. He knew all the plays. He understood the intent of the plays. He got the philosophy behind them. He studied defenses, too, so he could read them on the field and made adjustments accordingly.

    His command of this revolutionary scheme allowed him to attack defenses every way possible. He lined up all over the field. He often went in motion. His receiving skills matched his running ability. He blocked blitzing linebackers when needed, too.

    In their heyday, the Rams dared opponents to blitz -– trusting their ability to counter-attack, typically by getting the ball to Faulk.

    LEADERSHIP: On the field, Faulk barked out commands and policed his teammates. If a player didn’t get the concept of the “hurry up” offense, Faulk would pick him up off the turf and direct him to his spot in the formation. On the field, he was a second quarterback.

    Off the field, he had maintained his teammates’ respect. If Faulk could take game tapes home for additional review, shouldn’t lesser players do the same?

    When a team’s best player is also its hardest-working player, great things can happen. Just ask the baseball Cardinals.

    We saw a final example of Faulk’s leadership at the end of his playing career. When the knee injuries took their toll and finally knocked him into a back-up role, Faulk took great pride in helping Steven Jackson flourish as his successor.

    He was a class act until the end.

    ACCOMPLISHMENT: On Faulk’s watch, the Rams won two NFC Championships and one Super Bowl. He helped bring football titles to a city that had none.

    This is Marshall’s ultimate resume' point. Some of his individual records have already been eclipsed, but nobody can ever take away the titles the Rams earned with him as their offensive focal point.

    It’s a shame his career couldn’t last longer. It’s too bad he couldn’t stage one more comeback and help the Rams -– or another team -– make one more playoff run.

    But he is a smart man, as we said, and reason finally prevailed over emotion. In his heart, he still wants to compete. In his mind, he knows this is no longer possible.

    His retirement doesn’t come as a surprise, but it does stir some wistful reflection about what once was.

    We may never see another team like the 1999-2001 Rams and we may never see another pro football player like Marshall Faulk
    Last edited by RamWraith; -03-23-2007 at 08:09 AM.


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    Re: Faulk retirement articles and comments

    It's official at last
    By Jim Thomas
    ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
    03/23/2007


    It was almost a foregone conclusion last year, when he underwent additional knee surgery and informed the Rams he would not play in 2006, that Marshall Faulk had played his final football game in the NFL.

    Next week it will become official. Faulk plans to announce his retirement Monday at the NFL owners meetings in Phoenix, where he will be working as an analyst for the NFL Network.

    "He's one of the greatest players of all time and clearly a future Hall of Famer," Rams president John Shaw said Thursday. "He was one of the key ingredients that took our team from a team that won four games (in 1998) to a Super Bowl champion."

    Faulk, who turned 34 last month, had been coy in various interviews this offseason about the possibility of returning to the NFL in 2007. But multiple knee surgeries over the course of his 12 NFL playing seasons have taken their toll, and Faulk finally decided to call it a career.



    "It has been an honor and a pleasure to play in the National Football League," Faulk said in a statement. "I'd like to thank all my teammates and coaches with whom I've been associated with ... as well as the fans who supported me throughout the years."

    The Rams were very patient with Faulk over the course of this process. Instead of releasing him or forcing him into retirement, the club paid him a $1 million salary in 2006. In addition, the club is believed to have paid him a $225,000 roster bonus due earlier this month.

    "It was the view of our owners, and clearly the whole front office, that what he brought to us was something that was really unique," Shaw said. "And something that St. Louis has never had before in football — a world championship. He had the type of stature and significance that we felt he deserved the leeway to make the decision on his own terms."

    On the football field, the Rams moved on last season, with Steven Jackson taking over in the backfield and earning his first Pro Bowl berth.

    During a career that included five seasons with Indianapolis, Faulk established himself as one of the greatest running backs in league history.

    "You've got to take it a step further," former Rams coach Mike Martz said Thursday. "I think he's got to be one of the best overall football players in the history of the game. In the 80 years or so of the game, you've got to put him in that group, regardless of position."

    In St. Louis, Faulk was the centerpiece of the Greatest Show on Turf, leading the high-scoring Rams of Dick Vermeil, and then Martz, to Super Bowls following the 1999 and '01 seasons. With Faulk, Isaac Bruce, Torry Holt, Az-Zahir Hakim and two-time NFL MVP Kurt Warner, the Rams simply had too many options for most defenses to handle.

    "He will forever go down in my mind as the greatest player I have ever seen play," Warner said. "Not only because of his gifted physical ability, but also because of his dedication to and knowledge of every area of the game."

    Faulk leaves the game ranking ninth on the NFL's career list for rushing yards (12,279), fourth in touchdowns (136) and fourth in yards from scrimmage (19,154).

    Acquired in a 1999 trade with the Colts for second- and fifth-round draft picks, Faulk compiled three straight seasons of 2,000-plus yards from scrimmage with the Rams, earning NFL most valuable player honors in 2000. He was a seven-time Pro Bowler and was named the NFL's offensive player of the year for three consecutive seasons (1999-01).

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    Re: Faulk retirement articles and comments

    As always, Faulk knew just what to do


    (March 22, 2007) -- For 12 NFL seasons, all the way up until his retirement from the game became official today, running back Marshall Faulk had all the right moves.

    We watched feet that moved as if he were dancing with the stars. We watched hands so dependable, it was as if they were drenched with stick-um. We watched plays that no other running back in the game could make.


    Faulk got his start in Indianapolis -- a far cry from his current gig on NFL Network.
    Yet for all the yards he gained, for all the passes he caught, for all the touchdowns he scored, what fans couldn't see was one of the primary reasons -- maybe the primary reason -- Faulk should be taking up residence in Canton four years from now.

    It was what was under the helmet.

    Faulk didn't just have a beautiful mind, he had a football mind.

    Outside of quarterbacks, and maybe even including quarterbacks, there weren't any players any smarter than Faulk. He was the proverbial Smartest Guy in the Room. To this day, his former head coach Mike Martz thinks Faulk might just be the smartest player he has ever coached.

    With his vision and awareness, Faulk understood the game in a way others did not. He knew where each player was supposed to be on each play.

    Especially himself. Faulk knew when it was safe to leave the backfield to go out for a pass, and he knew when he had to step behind to pick up a blitzing safety, as he did in Super Bowl XXXIV, on the play in which Kurt Warner threw a 9-yard touchdown pass to Torry Holt to give the Rams a 16-0 lead.

    Of all his attributes, this was Faulk's greatest: the centerpiece of the Greatest Show on Turf could beat you with his brawn or his brains.

    The same brains that made him so effective on the football field made him a great analyst in his rookie season at NFL Network. He saw things other analysts did not. He made comments few others could. Few have ever started their TV careers with as much success as Faulk had over the past year. He was, unquestionably, the TV Rookie of the Year.

    And now, Faulk has used that same brain to make his latest and last intelligent football decision. Instead of taking another hit, Faulk has dished one out himself. He has informed the Rams, and the football world, that he's retiring.

    Faulk, who grew up on the streets of New Orleans before going on to star in Indianapolis and St. Louis, is smart enough to recognize that this is the right time to go.

    One more time, Faulk is scampering away, unable to be brought down.

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    Re: Faulk retirement articles and comments

    You are going to want to watch this video on NFL.com

    http://www.nfl.com/teams/story/STL/10080719 ---Click video link

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    Re: Faulk retirement articles and comments

    Quote Originally Posted by RamWraith View Post
    LEADERSHIP: On the field, Faulk barked out commands and policed his teammates. If a player didn’t get the concept of the “hurry up” offense, Faulk would pick him up off the turf and direct him to his spot in the formation. On the field, he was a second quarterback.
    He actually did that one time. I think it was Az Hakim. He got hurt inside of the 2 min warning and fualk ran up to him, picked him up off the turf, and ran him up to the line so he didn't cost the team a timeout.

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    Re: Faulk retirement articles and comments

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyPace View Post
    He actually did that one time. I think it was Az Hakim. He got hurt inside of the 2 min warning and fualk ran up to him, picked him up off the turf, and ran him up to the line so he didn't cost the team a timeout.
    If I remember it correctly, it was during the Rams-Titans game during the 1999 regular season. Warner was driving us downfield for the game-tying FG or game-winning score. Hakim was hurt, so Faulk ran over there and held him up until Warner could spike the ball. I think it was DeMarco Farr who said that may have been the smartest play he has ever seen Faulk make.

    Watch on NFL Network for some kind of Faulk-highlight video to pop up. It's almost sure to have that play on there. On America's Game with the one about the 1999 Rams, that play is on there.

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    Re: Faulk retirement articles and comments

    Marshall!
    Marshall!!
    Marshall!!!


    :l

    Thanks Wraith. 'Seen that Sabol interview six times but watching it a 7th was good!

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    Re: Faulk retirement articles and comments

    Quote Originally Posted by RealRam View Post
    Marshall!
    Marshall!!
    Marshall!!!


    :l

    Thanks Wraith. 'Seen that Sabol interview six times but watching it a 7th was good!
    i'm gonna miss chris berman saying that....

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    Re: Faulk retirement articles and comments


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    Re: Faulk retirement articles and comments

    Marshall The Great
    Monday, March 26, 2007

    By Duane Lewis
    Director/New Media

    As a running back, his style was very fluid and graceful, yet powerful.

    As a receiver, his route-running was as good as the best in the league with outstanding hands to match.

    Marshall Faulk's arrival in the Gateway City made Rams' football must-see TV. His acquisition on April 15, 1999, gave this team a Pro Bowl running back on the field, one complete with a home run threat as a runner or a receiver.

    What he gave the organization and the city was a winning attitude. Marshall had been a three-time Pro Bowler and four-time 1,000-yard rusher in his first five NFL seasons. At the time, the Rams had one player who had been to the Pro Bowl in WR Isaac Bruce.

    Simple put, Marshall Faulk was a great football player before he became a Ram.

    In the Gateway City, he became a Hall of Famer.

    In seven seasons on the field in the Golden Horns, he was the engine that made the Greatest Show on Turf as explosive as it was. He elevated his play on the field, and of those around him in both sides of the ball.

    Kurt Warner pulled the trigger, no doubt, throwing to a pair of future Hall of Famers in Bruce and Torry Holt. But Marshall was Faulk-tacular, equally dynamic as a runner from a handoff or as a receiver out the back field, the slot, or where ever he lined up.

    He once said special players make special plays on special days. Every time he took the field it seemed, you were bound to see something special. In consecutive weeks in his first season in St. Louis, Faulk showed the wide range of his ability. In week 5 at Atlanta, he showed his big-play skills in averaging 10.1 yards per carry in racking up 181 rushing yards and one touchdown at Atlanta. The following week at home against Cleveland, Faulk seemingly eluded every Browns' defender from the backfield to the end zone on an electrifying 33-yard touchdown run.

    In a comeback attempt that came up short at Tennessee in week 7, Faulk showed his moxie. As we tried to get in position for a game-tying field goal, Faulk single-handedly picked up an injured Az-Zahir Hakim off the ground to get him lined up for a Warner spike to stop the clock and save a timeout.

    There was an aura about Marshall that made teammates gravitate toward him and opponents fear him. Every time he touched the ball, he was a threat to score – whether it was taking a screen pass on the left side of the field, taking the ball upfield, weaving across the field dodging and eluding defenders en route to the right side of the end zone, or as simple as taking a handoff off left tackle and racing 70 yards untouched.

    In his Most Valuable Player season of 2000, his 11-touchdown barrage over the final three games of the regular season literally and figuratively pushed the team to the playoffs. The season-ending flurry was capped on Christmas Eve in his native New Orleans. Faulk's 39-touch-261-yard-3-TD effort in the Superdome to me remains his masterpiece, as he single-handedly willed the Rams to the playoffs, as he just would not let us lose. He finished the year with a then-NFL record 26 touchdowns – in just 14 games.

    One season later, he missed repeating as MVP by one vote to Warner in what arguably was finest season. Among the milestones set by Marshall was a career high in rushing yards, the first player in NFL history with four straight 2,000-yard seasons, and the only second player ever (Emmitt Smith) with consecutive 20-touchdown seasons.

    In addition, Faulk posted five 100-yard rushing games (including one 200-yard game), one 100-yard receiving game, nine 150-total yard games, two 200-total yard games, three multi-touchdown rushing games, two multi-touchdown receiving games, three-two touchdown games, two three-touchdown games, and one four touchdown game – again, in just 14 games.

    His preparation to win was exceeded only by his will to win. A fierce competitor, he backed downed from no one, and would take on anyone who challenged or questioned his teammates. If statistics are the standard by which greatness is measured, Marshall Faulk is greatness personified and one of the best ever.

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    Re: Faulk retirement articles and comments

    FAULK BY THE NUMBERS

    1–NFL Most Valuable Player Award (2000)
    2–Number of times Faulk posted back-to-back 200 total yards games (Oct. 17, 1999 - 213
    @ Atlanta; Oct. 24, 1200 vs. Cleveland) (Oct. 20, 2002 – 235 vs. Seattle; Nov. 3, 2002 – 236
    @ Arizona).
    3-–Consecutive Offensive Player of the Year Awards (1999 – 2001)
    4--Highest number of consecutive 100-yard rushing games, accomplished twice (Nov. 21,
    1999 – 21-126-0 @ San Francisco; Nov. 28, 1999 – 18-102-2 vs. New Orleans; Dec. 5, 1999
    – 22-118 @ Carolina; Dec. 12, 1999 – 29-154-1 @ New Orleans) (Nov. 16, 2003 – 20-103-0
    @ Chicago; Nov. 23, 2003 – 24-100-1 @ Arizona; Nov. 30, 2003 – 17-108-3 vs. Minnesota;
    Dec. 8, 2003 – 24-102-0 @ Cleveland).
    4.8--Career average per carry with the Rams, third highest franchise history
    5--The number of four-touchdown games in his career (tying a team record): @ San
    Francisco 10/29/00 (2r, 2p); vs. Minnesota 12/10/00 (4r); @ Tampa Bay 12/18/00 (3r, 1p);
    vs. Indianapolis 12/30/01 (3r,1p); vs. Seattle 10/20/02 (3r, 1p)
    6--Career playoff rushing touchdowns with the Rams, a franchise record
    7--The number of two-point conversions scored in his career (NFL record)
    8--Career playoff touchdowns scored with the Rams, a franchise record
    10--The number of 200 total yards games with the Rams (14 in his career)
    11--The number of touchdowns scored in the final three games of the 2000 season: 4 vs.
    Minnesota 12/10; 4 @ Tampa Bay 12/18; 3 @ New Orleans 12/24.
    25--Consecutive wins by Rams when Marshall gained at least 150 total yards (27-1 record
    overall)
    26--Number of touchdowns scored in 2000, then an NFL record
    27--Number of wins by the Rams (with no losses) when Faulk rushed for at least 100 yards
    49--Playoff receptions with the Rams, most in franchise history
    58--Rushing touchdowns as a Ram, most in franchise history
    85--Touchdowns as a Ram, most in franchise history
    99--Number of games played with the Rams
    100--The number of career rushing touchdowns scored, tied for 6th in NFL history
    136--Career touchdowns, fourth in NFL history
    159--Total rushing yards (on 31 attempts) vs. Philadelphia 1/27/02 in NFC Championship
    game, third most in franchise history
    204--Career high receiving yards total (on 12 receptions) vs. Chicago 12/26/99, the most by
    an NFL running back since 1965.
    286--Career-high total yards gained vs. Atlanta on Oct. 15, 2000 (25-208-1 rushing, 7-78-0
    receiving)
    509--Career playoff receiving yards with the Rams, fourth in franchise history
    519--Three-game rushing yards total vs. Oakland (10/13/02), vs. Seattle (10/20/02) and @
    Arizona (11/3/02), the highest three-game rushing total of his career. He joined Hall of
    Famers Jim Brown, O.J. Simpson, and Earl Campbell as the only players to have at least
    three consecutive 150-yard rushing games.
    561--Playoff rushing yards with the Rams, third in franchise history
    767--Career receptions, second in NFL history among running backs
    1,070--Total yards in playoffs with Rams, most in franchise history
    1,918--Number of combined attempts with the Rams (rushing/receiving/kickoff returns),
    most in franchise history
    6,875--Career receiving yards, most by a running back in NFL history.
    11,031--Total net yards with Rams, third in franchise history
    12,279--Career rushing yards, ninth in NFL history
    19,154--Career yards from scrimmage, fourth in NFL history

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    RamWraith's Avatar
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    Re: Faulk retirement articles and comments

    FUTURE HALL OF FAMER MARSHALL FAULK TO CONTINUE
    COMMITMENT TO ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY
    --Since joining the Rams in 1999, Marshall has provided more than $835,000 to
    inner-city youth; and his efforts will continue –
    ST. LOUIS – A future Hall of Fame running back, Marshall Faulk’s on the field
    accomplishments have been matched only by his philanthropic efforts, which Marshall has
    pledged to continue beyond his retirement from the game.
    To date, Marshall has provided more than $835,000 in financial assistance as well as hands-on
    involvement with inner-city youth and underprivileged children in St. Louis, New Orleans and
    San Diego as well as a few other cities through the Marshall Faulk Foundation. As part of those
    efforts, Faulk joined with the Rams Foundation to establish the Rams 28 Club, an incentivebased
    program for children living in public housing that rewards them for making positive
    choices in and out of the classroom.
    “It’s important to me because I see myself as those kids,” said Marshall. “I grew up in an innercity;
    I am a product of it. You just don’t have a lot of direction sometimes. I just try to give
    them the beliefs and dreams and let them know that I was sitting in that chair some years ago
    and you can make it.”
    Since the Rams 28 Club’s inception in 1999, more than 1,000 inner-city youth have heard
    Marshall’s message of hope and determination. Participants include children from St. Charles
    Boys & Girls Club (St. Charles), Cochran Community Center (St. Louis), Beyond Housing
    Castle Point Center (St. Louis), Jackie Joyner-Kersee Boys & Girls Club (East St. Louis) and
    Christian Activity Center (East St. Louis).
    In addition to his work with the Rams 28 Club, the Marshall Faulk Foundation has also
    committed time and resources to organizations and programs including the Right Step shoe
    program, a division of the St. Louis Public Schools Foundation; Lift for Life Gym; American
    Liver Foundation and Berkeley North County Athletic Association.
    Marshall has also been a long-time supporter of the Make-A-Wish Foundation by granting
    wishes to sick children as well as assisting the Rams in raising more than $250,000 for the
    organization.
    Marshall’s generosity has extended to his hometown of New Orleans. A product of the Desire
    Street Housing Projects 9th Ward, Marshall helped to fund a recreation center in his old neighborhood and contributed $40,000 to the Desire Street Ministries, an organization focused
    on indigenous leadership development for the youth.
    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Marshall hosted numerous fundraisers to assist with the
    city’s rebuilding efforts and donated an additional $70,000 to the Desire Street area. He also
    teamed up with Feed the Children, an international hunger relief organization, to distribute
    food, personal care items and toys to hungry children and families.
    Additionally, Marshall has been active in San Diego, where he attended college at San Diego
    State. In San Diego, Marshall has partnered with Easter Seals of Southern California to
    establish the Marshall Faulk Technology Center. The Center provides people with disabilities,
    as well as the community at large, the opportunity to become computer literate and gain a
    higher level of independence.
    Now, as Marshall enters retirement, he will continue to add to his off the field legacy, within the
    St. Louis community and beyond.

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    Re: Faulk retirement articles and comments

    THEY SAID IT
    Former Rams coach Dick Vermeil:
    “Marshall Faulk set the standard for what is considered great at the running back position. The
    term is loosely used, but Marshall defines it. You hear people talk all the time about ‘This guy
    is a great player or that guy is a great player’. They are not all great players. Marshall Faulk
    set the standard for what a great player is. For us, he was a difference maker. I’m not talking
    about winning six or seven games. I’m talking about the difference between winning a NFC
    Championship or a World Championship.”

    New Orleans Saints coach Sean Payton, Faulk’s position coach at San Diego State:
    “The first thing I think of about Marshall is what a smart player he was. He understood how
    to take a game plan, study it and his opponents, and then have his success translated to success
    on the practice field. He had a great feel for how to attack opponents and was so dangerous in
    a variety of ways. But he also always had that toughness and dependability in running between
    the tackles.”

    NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell:
    “Marshall Faulk was one of the great players of his era and one of the most versatile running
    backs in NFL history. We also know now that Marshall is a talented football broadcaster and
    we look forward to his continuing contributions to the NFL Network team.”
    Rams Quarterback Marc Bulger:
    “He’s the only player I played with who could have played quarterback (if he had QB passing
    skill). A lot of people throw that term around lightly, ‘He’s a quarterback on the field', but
    Marshall knew everyone’s assignment on offense, just like the quarterback. No only that, he’s
    the most complete running back I’ve ever seen. Obviously there are guys now, like LaDainian
    Tomlinson, who can do certain things, but to do it as long as Marshall did it—catching the ball,
    run, pass blocking—little things that go unnoticed, he is the best I’ve ever seen.”

    Retired New York Giants running back Tiki Barber:
    “Marshall was a pioneering player. As a threat in so many different aspects of football, he revolutionized
    the way in which the running back position was played. He was the player I wanted
    to emulate.”

    Former Rams coach Mike Martz:
    “Intellectually he was on a par with any coach in the league. We did things with Marshall
    because he said he could them. Things that we don’t teach backs to do. (Sometimes) when
    you run the tape back again you say, ‘Did he just do what I thought he did?’ The most memorable
    thing, in terms of a coach-player relationship…was when I first met him, in our first meeting
    with him and the offense. I didn’t know much about Marshall. Here he is, sitting in the
    front row, and he has pens and pencils and a notepad. He is taking notes down and he turns
    around to the rest of the guys and says, ‘Make sure you get this down’. He sat in the front row
    meeting after meeting. He was a leader in terms of his approach to the game and his professionalism.”

    Chicago Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher:
    “In his prime Marshall Faulk was the best running back I ever played against.”

    Green Bay Packers quarterback Brett Favre:
    “The one word that comes to mind when I think of Marshall is frustrating. He was the guy who
    frustrated not only the other team’s defense but their offense. Just knowing he was on the other
    sideline, there was more pressure on us to score. Every time we played him, I knew 30 points
    wasn’t going to win it.”

    Seattle Seahawks running back Shaun Alexander:
    “Marshall was the one you loved to watch, wished you could play like, and hated to play
    against. Mostly because he was going to do something that would make your own teammates
    come and ask you, ‘Can you do that?”

    Rams wide receiver Torry Holt:
    “The sacrifices he made on the field, as far as taking on double blitzes, playing with hurt knees,
    he still was effective and you never heard him complain. He was a very unselfish football player
    who revolutionized the running back position. He took it to a new level. What he did for
    the game, it will take awhile for it to be done again.”

    Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis:
    “I think of him as a man before a player and what a tremendous character and integrity he
    brought to the game. You knew that when you were facing him he was going to give 100% of
    what he had. He never cheated the game. You knew it was a fight every time out against him.
    Marshall wasn’t the biggest or fastest, but Faulk was Faulk. He ran with grace and power. He
    was the best running back I’ve seen in the NFL in a long time.”

    Tampa Bay Buccaneers linebacker Derrick Brooks:
    “I was always jacked to play against him and have some of those classic Monday Night games
    that we had over the years with their explosive offense and our explosive defense, it was an
    honor. My other thought now is, now he gets to get better with that golf game. I’ll never be able
    to catch him now. By the time I retire, he’s going to be three or four strokes better than me.”

    Former Rams cornerback ‘Dre Bly:
    “We came to St. Louis at the same time. He showed me the ropes and showed me that what we
    do is a job and to take your job seriously. We have kept in touch over the years and if he recognizes
    something in my game he would call me and tell me about it. I would not be where I am
    in my career if it was not for him and his guidance.”

    Rams defensive tackle La’Roi Glover:
    “As a teammate (at San Diego State), I found myself during the middle of a game not worrying
    about what the defensive staff is doing with adjustments. I’m ignoring all of that and I’m watching
    the offense to see what Marshall is going to do. Watching him make guys miss, taking plays
    80 and 90 yards. That’s how special he was.
    “As an opponent (in NFL) he was the best running back I ever played against, ever. He was a
    great ball carrier. He was spectacular in the open field. He was a heck of a receiver. He was a
    heck of a leader. He did it by example and he would get in a guy’s face when he had to. He was
    one of the greatest to play this game.”

    Former Rams quarterback Kurt Warner:
    “Marshall was one of the best teammates I ever played with. I enjoyed talking with him in the
    locker room, competing with him on the practice field, and achieving some amazing things with
    him on the field. He will forever go down in my mind as the greatest player I have ever seen
    play. Not only because of his gifted physical ability but also because of his dedication to and
    knowledge of every area of the game.”

    Rams tackle Orlando Pace:
    “Marshall was the ultimate teammate and team player. One of the smartest on the team and, as
    an offensive lineman, he made my job easier. He communicated with us on a regular basis.”

    Former Rams receiver Ricky Proehl:
    “He was a great friend, great teammate, and definitely the best and most complete football player
    that I have played with in 17 years.”

    Former Rams running backs coach Wilbert Montgomery:
    “He is just a student of the game. I enjoyed talking with him when he walked off the field and
    we would talk about what the defense was doing on first down and second down and what they
    were trying to take away from him. He was one of those guys who wanted the ball when the game
    was on the line. He was a very unselfish player. That’s what I really like about him. He didn’t
    care about the 100 yards or about scoring so many touchdowns. He respected his teammates and
    all he asked of his teammates was to respect what he brought to the game.”

    Gene Huey, Faulk’s running backs coach at Indianapolis:
    “It gladdens my heart to see where Marshall is retiring. There are few players who have made
    the successful transition from the playing field to the broadcast booth. As he was as a player,
    Marshall will demonstrate to the public and his peers that he will be one of the top professionals
    in that area.”

    Rams wide receiver Isaac Bruce:
    “Marshall always made everyone that he met better, not just in a football sense. I am honored to
    be considered a friend. I learned a lot from him. Running backs of the future will have to be
    compared to him. He is a very passionate guy and a great asset to St. Louis and the NFL.”

    Rams center Andy McCollum:
    “You could count on him not only to make the spectacular run, but if he needed to block a guy,
    he blocked the guy. He was a great leader.”
    Last edited by RamWraith; -03-26-2007 at 08:40 PM.

  14. #14
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    Re: Faulk retirement articles and comments

    Injuries force running back Faulk to retire
    Associated Press


    PHOENIX -- Marshall Faulk's decision was easy after spending last year working for the NFL Network: At 34, his body is more suited for a television studio than for the rigors of playing running back.

    After sitting out last season because of a knee injury, Faulk officially announced his retirement Monday. He's ninth on the NFL's career rushing list, 33 yards behind Jim Brown, who at one time was the standard for the position.

    Faulk is fourth in combined yards from scrimmage with 19,154 yards and his 6,875 yards receiving are the most ever among running backs.

    "Just being around the game last year, I realized how much I love it," Faulk said. "But my health is everything. And I didn't want to return if I couldn't get through a full season. It all came together when a close friend asked me 'How many 34-year-old running backs are there?'"

    Faulk starred at San Diego State, where he rushed for 386 yards and seven touchdowns in his first game, and led the nation in rushing as a freshman.

    He was the second pick overall in the 1994 draft by Indianapolis and was offensive rookie of the year that season.

    He was traded by the Colts to St. Louis in 1999, where he became part of "The Greatest Show on Turf" with quarterback Kurt Warner and receivers Isaac Bruce and Torry Holt. The team won the Super Bowl after the 1999 season and was upset two years later by New England in a Super Bowl that many critics thought the Rams would have won had Faulk carried the ball more often.

    Faulk noted Monday that he had an unusual role in the development of that team -- the injury during a 1999 exhibition game in San Diego to Trent Green that forced the Rams to go with Warner, an untested, undrafted free-agent backup at quarterback.

    "There's kind of an unwritten rule among veterans in those games that when the play is over, you stopped," Faulk said. "I was blocking on Rodney Harrison and we had some things going between us. But I kind of let up and he kept going and he hit Trent. So when Kurt was forced to play, I kind of felt responsible and really wanted to make up for it."

    He did.

    He was voted the league's Most Valuable Player and offensive player of the year that season and won the offensive honors the next two years also. In that 1999 season, he ran for 1,381 yards and a 5.5 average and caught 87 passes for 1,048 yards.

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    Re: Faulk retirement articles and comments

    Quote Originally Posted by RealRam View Post
    Marshall!
    Marshall!!
    Marshall!!!


    :l

    Thanks Wraith. 'Seen that Sabol interview six times but watching it a 7th was good!
    MARSHALL MARSHALL MARSHALL FAULK!!!!!!:r

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