Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    MauiRam's Avatar
    MauiRam is offline Pro Bowl Ram
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Maui, Hi.
    Age
    70
    Posts
    4,863
    Rep Power
    79

    Inside the NFL: Rams should say no to players like White, Crayton

    By Howard Balzer

    Sunday, May 30, 2010

    Fans want names; people theyíve heard of. It happens all the time. You know what Iím talking about. If a major-league baseball team makes a trade or signs a free agent, fans wonder why the Cardinals didnít get him.

    Itís the same way in football, perhaps even occurring more often because of the sheer number of players available and that switch teams each year. So, when the Seattle Seahawks acquired running back Leon Washington on draft weekend for a fifth-round draft pick, fans couldnít understand why the Rams didnít make that deal, even though Washington is a third-down back and might not even be ready for the start of the season because of the broken leg he suffered last season.

    Then, there is running back LenDale White, whom the Seahawks also acquired on the weekend of the draft from the Tennessee Titans. Seattle got White and defensive tackle Kevin Vickerson, and merely switched positions with the Titans in the fourth (seven spots) and sixth (nine spots) rounds.

    Naturally, fans figured the Rams should have made a play for White. Obviously, the Titans wanted nothing more to do with him, and basically gave him away. Since White played for new coach Pete Carroll at Southern Cal, they probably figured a new start would help him.

    Think again. Inconsistent players who donít take care of themselves usually donít last. And, thatís what happened when White was released Friday, 34 days after the trade.

    In a statement released by the team, Seahawks general manager John Schneider said, "It became apparent at this time LenDale was not ready to be a member of the Seattle Seahawks. It just did not appear to be the right fit at this point in our program. We wish LenDale all the best with his future."

    While reports on NFL Network linked the release to a four-game suspension that will be announced soon, Seattle sources indicate the team knew about the looming suspension when the trade was made, and that the decision was traced to a continued lack of commitment from White even though he had lost around 45 pounds. His conditioning was described as ďpoorĒ and a source told FoxSports.com his effort level negatively ďstood out like a sore thumb.Ē

    At a minicamp after the draft, he missed one day and was limited in two others because of a groin problem. In mid-May, he was not in attendance at an OTA practice, with Carroll claiming White was in Nashville because of problems related to the flooding there.

    Players like White never believe the problem is with them. That was evident in comments made by his uncle, Herman White, to the Associated Press after the release.

    "He wasn't doing good," Herman White said. "I have no idea what happened. He was surprised. I'm pretty shocked, based on what he's been telling me.Ē

    Of course, if a player canít be honest with themselves, they canít be with relatives.

    Earlier this week, LenDale White told reporters, "I feel great and this is a long time coming. I appreciate the opportunity and as long as Seattle fans stay patient with me, we'll be alright. I'll bring a lot of fight to this team, believe me.Ē

    Reflecting on his time in Tennessee, White said, "I was a lot younger in my mind, honestly. I put myself in a lot of situations.Ē

    It shouldnít be a surprise heís in another one, and is in danger of simply being forgotten.

    Yet, Iíve already heard fans say the Rams should give him a chance. Two teams couldnít wait to get rid of him in a monthís time, and people believe this is the type of guy the Rams should bring in?

    Say what you will about this process of rebuilding, but general manager Billy Devaney and coach Steve Spagnuolo are trying to accomplish it with quality people, in addition to having football ability.

    Itís clear that teams can win without the LenDale Whites of the world.
    What about Patrick?

    Then, thereís Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Patrick Crayton, another guy with an inflated opinion of himself.

    Crayton spoke out this week about wanting to be released by the Cowboys, and Iím sure it wonít be long until a clamor starts from Rams fans to add him to what is perceived as a talent-depleted position.

    Sure, the Rams could use a true, No. 1 receiver, as many teams could. But Crayton is not that guy. If he was, the Cowboys wouldnít have traded for Roy Williams in 2008 or drafted Dez Bryant this year.

    Crayton makes a big play now and then, but the last two seasons, he has caught 39 and 37 passes, respectively. Heck, Brandon Gibson had 34 receptions for the Rams last season, and he didnít join the team until Oct. 20 when he was traded from the Eagles in the Will Witherspoon deal.

    Yet, Crayton has acted like a petulant child this offseason, refusing to participate in offseason practices and asking to be released. He claims there isnít an open competition for jobs, yet isnít there competing.

    In a radio interview, he contradicted himself after being asked why he wants out. Said Crayton, "The thing is, you want to be wanted. Why would you go to a place that you're not feeling that way?"

    Asked why he feels unwanted, Crayton said, "I'm not sure if I'm wanted or I'm not wanted. I have not been in contact with anyone outside of my teammates and (receivers) coach Ray Sherman. I haven't had any contact with coaches, coordinators, anyone. So I'm not sure what their thoughts are at all."

    Huh? He first says he has spoken with Sherman, then says heís had no contact with coaches.

    Craytonís agent Fred Lyles asked the team to release him, a request that was refused. In an email to a Dallas reporter, Lyles wrote, "The situation may change before September. Realistically, the Cowboys would like to receive some compensation for Crayton."

    Of course, Crayton doesnít want to be in camp all summer, then be released or even traded just before the season starts.

    He said, "If I'm going to be with another team, I need to get used to another city, another franchise, a new coach, a new quarterback, a new coordinator, everything. Just a whole new environment. My wife and kids got to get settled in, got to get in schools and everything. I would love to have the opportunity to be able to compete with another team vs. come here and come here for a numbers thing where they're like, 'Oh, we're not going to pay you that to be our fourth or fifth guy,' or whatever the situation is and you kept me the whole training camp because you need camp bodies. To me, you're messing with people's careers and people's lives.

    ďI'm the insurance guy. And I think from now on that'll be my nickname. I'm insurance."
    A good bet

    The website bodog.com has already listed odds for the over/under on the temperature for Super Bowl 48 in Feb. 2014 in New Jersey. And, yes, there can actually be bets made, which might make this the lock of forever.

    The over/under is at 34Ĺ. That might sound reasonable, but consider this: Even if that February day turns out to be a mild one and the temperature during the afternoon hits, letís say, 50, by the time darkness sets in, the thermometer will plummet.

    Game time for the Super Bowl is normally around 6:20 Eastern, so bet on the temp being well below 34. Of course, if the NFL had any sense, for this game, it should be played in the afternoon, so if the temperature is brutal, it wonít be as bad as it would be at night.

    The NFL is playing with fire (or is it ice?) for this game, and too many people are thinking about what would happen if thereís a snowstorm. Snow wouldnít be that much of an issue, unless itís one of those paralyzing blizzards. Whatís more likely is extreme cold and wind that will make it bad for the fans ... and players.

    Of course, the players and the game itself are rarely considered when decisions like this are made, and the constant comments about cold-weather games in the past are irrelevant. Those games were played at the home of one team, where fans and players are accustomed to bad weather at that time of year.

    The Super Bowl is different. Itís the championship. The outcome shouldnít be compromised. The Colts-Bears game was affected by rain a few years ago, but at least players could feel their fingers. That might not be the case if itís a brutally cold day. Suppose two teams from warm-weather cities are in the game? And they are forced to play in bad conditions? Not to mention the thousands of fans from those cities that will now have weather to add to their preparations.

    Said Tony Dungy, who was the Indianapolis coach for that rainy Super Bowl, "You get to a Super Bowl and you want to put your best foot forward. If you win the game or you lose the game, you don't want it to be because of weather conditions.

    "We dealt with some rain in Miami and it happens -- it's something coaches deal with -- but I just think New York in February, you know there's going to be some weather issues."

    Then, there are the post-game festivities, which often last as long as 30 minutes. If itís a terribly cold day, no one will want to be outside for one extra minute.

    Rams coach Steve Spagnuolo remembers the 2007 season conference championship game when the Giants were in Green Bay and the wind-chill was minus-23 degrees.

    Recalled Spagnuolo, ďThat was the coldest day ever. What I remember most about that game was when the game was over and it was an away game and we won, we didnít have our crowd, and I was looking around. I didnít want to leave because you are trying to take it all in and I donít normally wear a hat, but I wore it for that game. I took my hat off and in about two minutes, my ears felt like they were going to come off. It was freezing.

    ďI said, ĎYou know what? This is enjoyable taking it all in, but I am taking it in in the locker room.í I was done.Ē

    As this idea should have been.

    But now comes word subsequent cold-weather Super Bowls could be played if this one goes off well. Brilliant. Get lucky one time. Take the chance again. Itís like Russian Roulette.

    In addition, there is actually talk the Pro Bowl could be played in New Jersey the week before the 2014 Super Bowl. Hey, why not? Take a chance with two games instead of one, and hope any top of the players show up


  2. #2
    RockinRam's Avatar
    RockinRam is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    4,075
    Rep Power
    44

    Re: Inside the NFL: Rams should say no to players like White, Crayton

    I wouldn't touch LenDale White with a ten foot pole.



    But Patrick Crayton's situation is more sympathetic. I'm not saying I would necessarily want Crayton on our team, because I don't, but I feel that the situation he is in, in Dallas is not very beneficial to him.

    But it's all a business, so oh well.

  3. #3
    Varg6's Avatar
    Varg6 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    3,617
    Rep Power
    43

    Re: Inside the NFL: Rams should say no to players like White, Crayton

    Quote Originally Posted by RockinRam View Post
    I wouldn't touch LenDale White with a ten foot pole.



    But Patrick Crayton's situation is more sympathetic. I'm not saying I would necessarily want Crayton on our team, because I don't, but I feel that the situation he is in, in Dallas is not very beneficial to him.

    But it's all a business, so oh well.
    I agree, although I wouldn't mind giving Crayton a shot especially if our WRs don't pan out during Training Camp.


    Always and Forever a fan of the St. Louis Rams

  4. #4
    TekeRam's Avatar
    TekeRam is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Lexington, Kentucky, United States
    Age
    30
    Posts
    3,878
    Rep Power
    71

    Re: Inside the NFL: Rams should say no to players like White, Crayton

    Crayton's never been given a shot at starting either, so him having receiving totals in the 30's is completely unsurprising on a team that is run first. That said, if he really was all that, he'd have been the one to explode into a starting receiver, not Miles Austin. Personally I would be happy to give him a shot if he were free, but until he's released, I wouldn't go after him. We need all the draft picks we can get at this point.

    As for White... he's a dirty Trojan, AND his old coach didn't want him. No way, no how!
    I believe!

  5. #5
    shower beers's Avatar
    shower beers is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    3,043
    Rep Power
    59

    Re: Inside the NFL: Rams should say no to players like White, Crayton

    Quote Originally Posted by MauiRam View Post

    Asked why he feels unwanted, Crayton said, "I'm not sure if I'm wanted or I'm not wanted. I have not been in contact with anyone outside of my teammates and (receivers) coach Ray Sherman. I haven't had any contact with coaches, coordinators, anyone. So I'm not sure what their thoughts are at all."

    I felt sympathetic with Crayton until I read that. Of course you have no idea what's going on, you're not talking with anyone! I think they'll eventually dump Williams and keep Crayton, Austin and Bryant as their 3 receiver set.

  6. #6
    NJ Ramsfan1 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    new jersey
    Posts
    2,207
    Rep Power
    70

    Re: Inside the NFL: Rams should say no to players like White, Crayton

    I'll stand from the highest mountain and say the same words I've always said: "I do not want guys on my team with character or work ethic issues". More often than not, they burn you. Rarely do they learn from their mistakes. And only in the most unique of circumstances (Randy Moss) does it work. You might get a couple of good performances, but at what cost? As a coach, I can go out there and lose with guys who are going to do what they're told and give 100%: I REFUSE to lose with some jerk who is an overweight, lazy prima donna. And LenDale White qualifies on all three counts.

    Crayton doesn't have the same baggage, but it is evident by his comments that his attitude is one of selfishness and self-pity. He'd be happy as long as he's the man; once Mardy Gilyard or Laurent Robinson outplays him or gets more touches, he'll start *****ing. No thank you.

    There's a reason guys like this become available- and every reason to avoid them like the plague if you want long term success. You don't sell your soul to the Devil for temporary respectability.

  7. #7
    Bralidore(RAMMODE)'s Avatar
    Bralidore(RAMMODE) is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,149
    Rep Power
    22

    Re: Inside the NFL: Rams should say no to players like White, Crayton

    Lendale isn't a premier talent at runningback even if he wasn't lazy and all the other names that describe him, he shouldn't even be in consideration.

    Crayton isn't a White apparently, but does he really offer that much more than what we have, especially at his age. We have returners. He'd just take a spot away from a young talent to play for us for a couple of seasons, all the while offering nothing new as far as talent. Let's move on here...

Similar Threads

  1. Jim Thomas Live
    By RamWraith in forum RAM TALK
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: -04-09-2008, 09:53 PM
  2. Gordo Live, Monday, March 3rd
    By RamWraith in forum RAM TALK
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: -03-04-2008, 07:22 PM
  3. Jim Thomas Live, Nov 20th--Lots of good stuff
    By RamWraith in forum RAM TALK
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: -11-21-2007, 03:18 PM
  4. Postgame With Gordo
    By RamWraith in forum RAM TALK
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: -10-14-2007, 08:47 PM
  5. Salary Cap Request
    By HUbison in forum RAM TALK
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: -12-31-2004, 02:48 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •