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  1. #1
    AvengerRam's Avatar
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    Jack Youngblood, on pain...

    From a recent online Foxsports gametime chat with Jack Youngblood:


    Reader question: You played in the Super Bowl with a broken leg against Pittsburgh, did it hurt? -- R. Burns, Manhattan Beach, Calif.
    Broken legs don't hurt! I wish I had a nickel for every time I've been asked that!
    That should be on a plaque in the Rams' locker room!


  2. #2
    r8rh8rmike's Avatar
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    Re: Jack Youngblood, on pain...

    Just my opinion, but they don't make 'em like Jack Youngblood anymore. It's a completely different world.

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    Re: Jack Youngblood, on pain...

    Quote Originally Posted by r8rh8rmike
    Just my opinion, but they don't make 'em like Jack Youngblood anymore. It's a completely different world.
    And more the pity for it.

  4. #4
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    Re: Jack Youngblood, on pain...

    Jack Younblood= when football players were football players!

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    Re: Jack Youngblood, on pain...

    Quote Originally Posted by r8rh8rmike
    Just my opinion, but they don't make 'em like Jack Youngblood anymore. It's a completely different world.
    Mike, I don't know that they EVER made'em like Jack Youngblood. Either they broke the mold after him......or he broke it over their heads.
    "Before the gates of excellence the high gods have placed sweat; long is the road thereto and rough and steep at first; but when the heights are reached, then there is ease, though grievously hard in the winning." --- Hesiod

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    Re: Jack Youngblood, on pain...

    He was the man. I'd love to see Jack come out of the woods and coach this D line back to respectability.:clanram:
    JUST WIN ONE FOR THE FANS


    "HIT HARD, HIT FAST, AND HIT OFTEN"
    Adm. William "Bull" Halsey

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    RAMSTAR is offline Registered User
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    Re: Jack Youngblood, on pain...

    True story.....
    Ex-teammate & Pro Football Hall a Famer Merlin Olsen, paid Jack Youngblood the ultimate compliment. He called Jack Youngblood "the perfect defensive end." Merlin Olsen had a profound effect on Jack Youngblood. It was Olsen who taught Youngblood what it meant to play in pain.

    "I remember one time when a guy stepped on Merlin's hand with those nylon cleats," says Youngblood. "Ripped it wide open." He came back to the huddle holding it. I looked over, and I could see all the bones. I almost fainted. Merlin said, 'Aw it's all right.' "He held it together and stopped the bleeding a little bit. That was first down. He stayed out there two more plays before we went to the sidelines."
    They were sure tough SOB's back then..wish we had someone with the stones these two carry....

  8. #8
    r8rh8rmike's Avatar
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    Re: Jack Youngblood, on pain...

    Quote Originally Posted by HUbison
    Mike, I don't know that they EVER made'em like Jack Youngblood. Either they broke the mold after him......or he broke it over their heads.
    There were a few HUb, but these days it's hard to imagine or remember. Other than Youngblood playing with a broken leg, this is the guy that for me, epitomized what football players were, and should be all about:

    With barely a minute remaining, the Colts trailed by a couple of points. Doug Atkins hit Unitas in his backfield and broke Unitas' nose. The Colts called time out, but they couldn't get the bleeding to stop. Jim Parker, the Hall of Fame offensive lineman, remembered years later, "It was awful. You couldn't even look at John's face, it was so busted up. And the blood kept coming. Finally, Alex Sandusky reached down and grabbed a clump of mud and shoved it up Unitas' nose."

    Several months back, I asked Unitas about the story. He remembered Coach Weeb Ewbank trying to pull him out of the game.

    "You do," Unitas told Ewbank, "and I'll kill you."

    Moments later, with seconds left on the clock and tacklers descending on him, Unitas lofted a game-winning touchdown pass to Lenny Moore, who leaped over the Bears' J.C. Caroline in the corner of the end zone.

  9. #9
    RealRam's Avatar
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    Re: Jack Youngblood, on pain...

    Ah, yes. Football was very different in that respect. It was quite more brutal, more savage. And of course, the changes implemented in today's NFL serves the usual sets of 'pros' and 'cons'.

    The pain -- even the protective equipment to help against pain -- was at a different level altogether. Add to the list of consumate warriors / samurai / professionals / do-or-die players: Larry Wilson, S, St. Louis Cardinals [played w/two broken hands, INT'd a pass and returned it for a TD Vs. Giants]; Dick Butkus, LB, Chicago Bears and many, many others, most of whom remained unnoticed under the headlines of the more popular, heroic players.

    Technology (knowledge in sports medicine, therapy), political correctness, players union, the media, etc., have brought on an entire new image and philosophy to the NFL -- in effect, to all pro sports. Sure, pain is still part of the game -- again, as it is in all pro sports -- but not as it was in the NFL 45 or 50 years ago.

    Those stories about Unitas' broken nose and bloody vision while still in the game; about our own Merlin Olsen's hand exposed and open raw for anatomy class, and about Jack Youngblood's broken leg are all true. Countless others too.

    Today, merry millions of dollars are poured into the pockets of the players. Some deserve it, many don't. Bottom line is this, playing with pain is not as common as it was -- and those aforementioned names are a rarity.

    'They don't make'em like they used to' rings honestly so. At least, for the most part. Isaac Bruce, for example, is playing in pain -- and is productive. That takes courage and commitment.

    Hopefully the younger players will learn from the old, rugged veterans. From the grunts.

    But then, don't be surprised if soon the NFL will 'have to' allow lady* players to be part of the roster...

    :

    *PS: "Disclaimer"... I'm not saying that women are 'less tough' than men. But the pain threshold will probably see another change (politcally correct, nonetheless). Far more 'roughing the passer' penalties too.

  10. #10
    RealRam's Avatar
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    Re: Jack Youngblood, on pain...

    Correction: it was Vs. Steelers that Larry Wilson made that unforgettable play with both hands broken -- and he didn't score a TD but it resulted in one.
    __________________________________________

    NFL Greatest Players / Hollywood Sports Book.com

    Larry Wilson: He was the bane of every quarterback's existence, the player most likely to deliver physical and mental pain. His 6-0, 190-pound body was a cleverly disguised wrecking machine.

    Whether dashing madly into an opposing backfield -- he was the pioneer of the safety blitz -- or aggressively defending against the pass, Larry Wilson spent 13 seasons spreading his special kind of fear around the NFL.

    It was a fear born out of respect for the oft-described "toughest player in the game." Wilson was a football bulldog, a free safety for the St. Louis Cardinals who played through incredible pain and never conceded a down.

    Former New York Giants coach Allie Sherman called Wilson "the goingest player I ever saw." Others called him the NFL player who coaxed more out of his abilities than any other.

    Wilson's reckless style inspired Cardinals defensive coordinator Chuck Drulis' innovative idea for the safety blitz -- code name "Wildcat." From 1960 to 1972, the former University of Utah halfback shot the gaps of offensive lines, making life miserable for quarterbacks and setting himself up for nasty blows from much-bigger blocking backs.

    When Wilson stayed back in coverage, he was a different kind of Wildcat -- a great open-field tackler and an instinctive pass defender with an uncanny knack for getting to the ball.

    Over his Hall of Fame career, Wilson, an eight-time Pro Bowl selection, intercepted 52 passes, including a league-leading 10 in 1966. But it was one he made in 1965 that brought him everlasting fame.

    Playing with casts on both of his broken hands, he leaped high to block a pass by Steelers quarterback Bill Nelsen, cradled the deflection in his arms and ran the ball back 35 yards, setting up a touchdown.


    The play was vintage Larry Wilson. :angryram:


    [Italics, color mine]
    Last edited by RealRam; -11-30-2005 at 06:02 PM.

  11. #11
    RealRam's Avatar
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    Re: Jack Youngblood, on pain...

    From Cantonrep.com...
    _________________________________________

    Circa 1973, Vs. Steelers

    ...Olsen taught Youngblood to play every play as if it was the only play in the game. He also taught him what it meant to play with pain. Sometimes words were not necessary, as was the case when the Rams played at old Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh for the first time.


    "It was an ugly day, snowing and all that stuff," Youngblood said. "So we decided to try to wear cleats on the field.


    "Apparently, somebody was wearing a pair of shoes that had the old studs in the shoe rather than in the cleat. He stepped on Merlin’s hand and sliced it from his little finger knuckle all the way across the back of his hand.


    "We went back to the huddle. I happened to lean over and see Merlin’s hand. You could see the tendons and ligaments in the back of his hand.


    "He said, 'We'll fix it when the series is over.' I'm looking at it going, 'Oh, my goodness.' It just laid open. And he's not even paying attention to it. He never missed a heartbeat."


    Olsen closed out his career by playing in a Rams record 198 straight games.


    He held the record for eight seasons until Youngblood broke it the year of his retirement.


    As was the case with his mentor, Olsen, Youngblood also never missed a heartbeat.


    "One of the things said about Jack was he was a player of the old school, and that's absolutely true,"' Olsen said. "He was kind of a throwback. He was not the kind of guy who had to call his attorney or agent to check and see if he should play.


    "There are a lot of examples of minor problems that would have kept a lot of people out early on. Jack would just ignore them and keep right on going. He wanted to be on the football field."'

    [Italics, color mine] :clanram:
    Last edited by RealRam; -11-30-2005 at 06:00 PM.

  12. #12
    RealRam's Avatar
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    Re: Jack Youngblood, on pain...

    One of the injuries I cannot see anyone playing with in a contact sport is a concussion -- I don't care how 'tough' they are!

    :tut

  13. #13
    bruce_wannabe Guest

    Re: Jack Youngblood, on pain...

    But Still Players Like Youngblood Are Not Around Anymore

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