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  1. #1
    RamWraith's Avatar
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    Kacyvenski signed

    Rams | Kacyvenski signed
    Tue, 3 Oct 2006 14:28:31 -0700

    The St. Louis Rams have signed free agent LB Isaiah Kacyvenski (Seahawks) to a one-year deal. Financial terms were not disclosed.


  2. #2
    AvengerRam's Avatar
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    Re: Kacyvenski signed

    Interesting. KFFL had a blurb this morning saying that the Seahawks were interested in re-signing him. Not a bad pickup with Pisa fighting his way through the elbow injury.
    Last edited by AvengerRam; -10-03-2006 at 06:20 PM.

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    Re: Kacyvenski signed

    Nice pickup, agreed Avenger. He's definitely going to help with whole Pisa situation if it gets bad..


    Always and Forever a fan of the St. Louis Rams

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    Re: Kacyvenski signed

    Help a hell of a lot more than just the Pisa situation. This kid has been the special teams captain for the last 2 years. He is smart as hell (Harvard) and has an impeccable work ethic. He has more of a future on this team then maybe Chillar. And did I mention that we just stole one from the Seahawks.

    My biggest question is who gets axed to keep him.

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    Re: Kacyvenski signed

    Here is a story on him from the USA Today


    By Chris Colston, USA TODAY

    The father was a dishwasher and a nursery home fix-it man. The mother was a missionary. They had six children. The first, Suzie, died at 5 months because of previously undetected pneumonia.
    The last went to Harvard and played in Super Bowl XL.

    This is the story about that youngest child, Isaiah Kacyvenski, a 6-1, 252-pound reserve linebacker for the Seattle Seahawks.

    His story is so remarkable, the best thing to do is simply tell it.

    The tent. He'll never forget his family living in the tent.

    There was a missionary training camp, his mother's idea. David and Margaret sold all of their possessions and moved their five children to Ashland, Va., where they slept at night on concrete slabs. When the couple realized the camp was a mistake, they moved to the place where they spent their honeymoon: Rockport, Mass.

    David got a job washing dishes at a restaurant, the Old Farm Inn. Nearby lived old Bob Silva, who rented his big backyard to vacationers. "Most people stayed there for a couple of days," Isaiah says. "We were there for three months."

    They had little money so they lived in a tent, a second-hand Eureka model that could accommodate 10. They had to patch the roof with duct tape and glue, and rain would drip through the holes. They slept on the ground, in sleeping bags, and they often rose soaked from the morning dew. Mr. Silva had dug a hole in the ground and built a shelter around it. This was the Kacyvenski family bathroom.

    In the back of his house Mr. Silva had a spigot where the kids would soap up and take freezing showers together. Sometimes, they'd go to a rock quarry that was about a mile away, shampoo their hair, take off all their clothes and leap from a 20-foot cliff.

    "I go back now, and it doesn't look like much," Isaiah says. "But it seemed so high then."

    To feed his family, David sometimes brought home scraps from the Inn. The kids would go to the beach and comb the sand for empty cans, hours at a time. Sometimes they'd spot a family drinking from a cooler and hang around, waiting for them to discard anything they could return for cash. "Our spending money," Isaiah says.

    They lived in the tent for the summer, then moved to Vestal, N.Y., with his mother's sister. But having nine people under one roof, including five kids running afoot, became too much, and the family moved to a house nearby. When they couldn't afford the rent, they were forced back into the tent. It was colder now, and Isaiah remembers how seven people in one tent was a little tight but their bodies kept each other warm for those tough three weeks.

    Through it all, Isaiah still went to school, and sometimes the kids would notice the grass stains on his pants from their playground football games. For weeks at a time, the family had no means of washing their clothes. "I didn't volunteer that information," he says. "Only my best friend knew we were living in a tent, and he respected my privacy."

    They moved into another house, in nearby Endicott, but they couldn't afford a television, and David would sometimes search trash bins for food. "The thing you wanted to find was something unopened," Isaiah says. "Bread that only had a little mold."

    The Cider Mill Playhouse on Route 26 made its own cider and doughnuts. Sometimes the doughnuts would hit the ground, and the Mill had to throw them out. A half-hour before the Mill closed, the Kacyvenski kids would stand outside and wait for them. "They'd put them in cardboard boxes," Isaiah says. "Some were good, and some were stale. But to us, it was one of the few treats we could have."

    Most of the doughnuts were plain, and, to be honest, they didn't taste like much. "But if you found a cinnamon one or a powdered one," he says, "that was the mother lode."

    The kids would also eat popcorn for days at a time. "To break the monotony," he says, "I'd put water on it, to make it like a cereal."

    It was a tough way to grow up, but the beatings were worse.

    David has struggled with low self-esteem all his life, scarred by an abused childhood of his own, and was still suffering the trauma of losing his firstborn suddenly.

    His father, John, was a raging alcoholic who regularly beat his mother. One night he got in the way, and his father threw him across the room. His mother ended the marriage that night.

    "It was a cycle," Isaiah says. "Without realizing it, he was doing the same thing to his own kids."

    Isaiah would be afraid to ask his father for simple things, like money for a snack, "for fear that he'd blow up on me, that he'd haul off and whip me. I didn't realize 'til I got older; 'Wow, that's pretty messed up, to be that afraid.' "

    One day Dan, the oldest brother, flunked a seventh-grade math class. "I was in bed, sleeping," Dan says. "I woke up when my father pulled me by my ankles, slammed me to the floor and beat me with his belt."

    David says he had not been drinking that night; he had given it up in 1976, after identifying his father in a morgue. "But I was a dry drunk," he says.

    "My dad wasn't the best father," Isaiah says, "but my mom always said he did the best with what he had. She would never let us talk bad about him."

    Everybody has their breaking point, and David and Margaret divorced when Isaiah was 9, the year he discovered football. He listened on a battery-powered radio as Chicago beat New England in Super Bowl XX. When he was 13, his mother left to do missionary work.

    "She had so much faith in God's will for her," Isaiah says. "She would leave New York for missionary work in San Francisco with $50. Maybe she would stop and work somewhere. Maybe she'd have to hitchhike. But she wasn't afraid because she had faith."

    With their mother gone, their father returned. "We didn't want him to come back," Isaiah says. "It was a rocky time."

    When he turned 15, Isaiah became obsessed with one simple goal: earn a football scholarship to Notre Dame. He began rising at 5:30 a.m. to lift weights. He threw himself into his schoolwork. He became an honor student and an outstanding football player. His peers named him homecoming king in his senior year. He was football captain. Then, the morning of the state semifinal game, there was that awful feeling he would never forget.

    Isaiah had risen that morning to use the bathroom and passed his father. By the look on his face, Isaiah knew something was wrong. When David told him his mother had died, Isaiah's knees gave out and he fell to the floor in tears. Isaiah says that within five minutes his girlfriend and the woman he would marry, Lauren, was at his side.

    Margaret had been walking by the highway at 2 a.m. when a tractor-trailer struck her. "It's pitch black out and she's walking by herself on the side of a highway in the middle of nowhere, and she's not afraid," Isaiah says. "No fear, but she had faith in God. Think about that."

    The semifinal game was in Syracuse, a 1-hour bus ride away. Isaiah sat in the back of the bus. Everybody left him alone so he could cry in peace.

    "Ask my wife. I can remember every stupid little thing from every game I've played, even from my sophomore year in high school," Isaiah says. "But I don't remember much from that game. Honestly. I know I had some touchdowns and an interception and lots of tackles, but that's it. I just lost myself in that game. I didn't have to think about anything. I could just be."

    Even now he feels the pain of loss. "Nothing compares to losing your mother, especially sudden like that," he says. "You can't put it into words. It just wrenches your heart. I had a roommate in college who lost his mother when he was young. We talked about how a part of you dies. That was the case with me. Something died inside me."

    At the funeral, all the children talked about a letter they received from her on Mother's Day. Each letter was different some were written on paper towels, like a scroll all personalized, and each one said, "You have always been my favorite child."

    "We didn't know she said that to each of us," Isaiah says, "until she was gone."

    Three times, he made all state. USA TODAY named him an honorable-mention All-American. But to his disappointment, Notre Dame never offered him a scholarship. He was set to accept an offer from Connecticut when, two weeks before signing day, Harvard coach Tim Murphy offered him an academic scholarship.

    At first he didn't think he would fit in with Cambridge's moneyed elite. But he knew he made the right decision when, while packing for school, he came across a photograph of his mother taken on homecoming night. She was wearing his crown and a Harvard sweatshirt. "For some reason, I had never noticed it before," he says.

    He still has the sweatshirt. It's spattered with paint. He wears it sometimes.

    His first few weeks in Cambridge were life-altering. Imagine, cafeterias filled with food. Anything you want meat, vegetables, potatoes, apple pie and as much as you want. He put on 35 pounds his freshman year.

    He helped Harvard win its first Ivy League title in a decade. He became the first player in school history to start every game of his career. He graduated cum laude with a pre-med degree. Seattle made him the 119th pick of the 2000 NFL Draft.

    The Seahawks gave him permission to miss minicamp to receive his Harvard diploma, but Isaiah had a better idea.

    Two years ago, David's battered old car ran out of fuel. He was trying to cross five lanes of traffic to get to the gas station. He made it across four lanes, but a car hit him on the fifth and he was thrown onto the hood. He survived, but a titanium rod remains in his leg and he walks with a limp.

    Isaiah began thinking about his father's mortality. He didn't know his grandparents, and his mother was gone. David was his remaining link to the past. Isaiah's attitude toward his father softened.

    "With my personality, it's hard for me to hold a grudge," Isaiah says. "I can't forget what happened growing up, but I can forgive him for it. I saw the effort he was making to change."

    He understood that David had a lifelong battle with low self-esteem. "Sometimes this is a little awkward to talk about," Isaiah says. "But I already had all these experiences from Harvard. I thought it would be great for Dad to see what it felt like to be a Harvard grad."

    So he sent David to graduation in his place.

    Their healing process took another step when Isaiah and Lauren had their first child, Isaiah Jr., on Nov. 3, 2003.

    "After Isaiah was born, what we experienced growing up seemed even more unfathomable to me," he says. "I started asking my father some hard questions."

    On the 1-hour ride from the Syracuse airport, Isaiah confronted David. "Why did you whip me?" he said. "Why did you beat me?"

    The questions caught David off-guard. He answered, "Because I was a crazy man."

    That wasn't good enough for Isaiah. There was no justification for the abuse, he said. None. Do you feel sorry for it?

    Over the next few days David considered his life. He called his son and said yes to it all. He had a disease, he said, but now he's sober, and he's fighting it. He was sorry for what he did and asked forgiveness.

    "It takes a man to face your failures like he did," Isaiah says.

    Their relationship grew to the point where they could share a hug. And now all of the children have forgiven him, all but Dan, who took the brunt of the abuse.

    "I still wake up in a cold sweat from nightmares of my father," Dan says. "I'm 34 years old, and I still have to deal with that. He's that deep into my psyche."

    Isaiah led the Seahawks in special-teams tackles in 2005 and helped them to their first Super Bowl. He brought all 15 remaining family members together at Super Bowl XL, including Dan, his brother Israel, 30, and sisters Emily, 35, and Catherine, 32. When he saw them before the game, he was so happy he found himself gritting his teeth, trying not to cry.

    But Isaiah held no expectations that the Super Bowl might be the fulcrum for David and Dan's reconciliation. "I wish we could be a normal family someday," Isaiah says. "But the ball is in (Dan's) court. How he deals with it is on his own time. Dad understands that."

    The two shook hands at the Super Bowl and were cordial, but their relationship hasn't changed. "I don't come from the school of thought that, because he's my father, I have to reconcile with him," Dan says. "This is my time now, and I don't care to spend it with him."

    NFL Films aired a feature on the family that coincided with the Super Bowl, and many national writers told the Kacyvenski story during Super Bowl week.

    The experience was hard for David, whose problems became public. "I never saw the show until it was on TV, and there is Isaiah, pointing to a dumpster, saying I searched for food there," he says. "That that wasn't easy for me.

    "The next day I was in the shower room at the YMCA. I overheard some guys talking. They said, 'That's the guy who beat his kids and lived in a tent.' From mid-January through February, I felt like I was going to split in two. I told Isaiah, 'Don't ever have anybody call me again.' "

    Since then he's had time to process the experience. "That media thing was God's way of having me face the issue," David says. "It's taken a lifetime for me to be honest with myself."

    Times are good now for Isaiah, 28. A month ago he and Lauren celebrated the birth of a daughter, Lilliana Thunder. Because he nailed his 2004 incentives, he would have been due $1.5 million in 2006, putting his job security at risk. Agent John Drana and the Seahawks restructured his contract to $600,000 in exchange for a $125,000 bonus, which helped the team afford new receiver Nate Burleson.

    Some players might have balked at such a pay cut, but Kacyvenski's childhood memories are etched into his mind. "It's my single driving force," he says. "I am not going to let my family live like we did. It just drives and drives and drives me.

    "But you know what? I still can't stand to eat a plain doughnut."

  6. #6
    chipperjones Guest

    Re: Kacyvenski signed

    I really hope so. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying your lying but can you give me a site to find it on?

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    ImJohnWayne is offline Awaiting Email Conformation
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    Re: Kacyvenski signed

    This was a hard guy for the Seahawks to let go, they had to drop him to add more depth at RB when Alexander went down.

  8. #8
    RamsFan16 Guest

    Re: Kacyvenski signed

    Could Travis Fisher possibly getting cut? I mean, maybe Sunday was a last chance for Fisher?

  9. #9
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    Re: Kacyvenski signed

    why would we cut fisher when he is starting... the person who the rams would release would be either brandon green or dwaine carpenter or jermtrius butler... a butler release would come with a cap hit though

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    RamWraith's Avatar
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    Re: Kacyvenski signed

    What are you refering to?? The signing?? If so...we do not post poor information here :-)

    Remember that...and you can take that to the bank!


    Quote Originally Posted by chipperjones View Post
    I really hope so. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying your lying but can you give me a site to find it on?

  11. #11
    chipperjones Guest

    Re: Kacyvenski signed

    I'm not saying your lying.Sorry if I offended you.I just want to read an article on it.Honestly, I beleive you.

  12. #12
    RamWraith's Avatar
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    Re: Kacyvenski signed

    This information came from KFFL, which has been a VERY reliable source of information as they are a pay site and stake a reputation on their name. All thof KFFL's free stuff comes directly from News Wires, most are AP stuff. 90% of the time you can bet the Post Dispatch and their Cardinal infatuation will post the story well after it breaks if it is Rams related. As long as the Cards are in the playoffs, look for another source of information. A great place to start is here at the Clan.


    Quote Originally Posted by chipperjones View Post
    I'm not saying your lying.Sorry if I offended you.I just want to read an article on it.Honestly, I beleive you.
    Last edited by RamWraith; -10-03-2006 at 07:57 PM.

  13. #13
    chipperjones Guest

    Re: Kacyvenski signed

    Alright thanks.

  14. #14
    bela Guest

    Re: Kacyvenski signed

    Congrats Ram fans - Kaz is a real quality guy, a real fan favorite out here. Most of us Hawk fans are pretty bummed about losing him.

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    general counsel's Avatar
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    Re: Kacyvenski signed

    I new rams linebacker named isaiah. I love it.

    ramming speed to all

    general counsel


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