By Bill Coats
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
Monday, Nov. 13 2006

Seattle It's been quite a half-year for Rams defensive end Victor Adeyanju.
Drafted in the fourth round in April out of Indiana University, he was thrust
into the lineup in September when Anthony Hargrove went awol, and has started
the last seven games.

Then on Sunday's opening drive, Adeyanju scooped up a Seahawks fumble, turned
and saw only green turf in front of him. Adeyanju's 89-yard scamper gave the
Rams the early lead vs. NFC West rival Seattle.

Funny thing, though. Adeyanju has scored two touchdowns, and his team lost both
times.

On Sept. 18, 2004, he brought back a fumble 4 yards, but the Hoosiers lost to
Kentucky 51-32. On Sunday, the Rams succumbed to the Seahawks 24-22 on a late
field goal.

So, Adeyanju can be forgiven for not celebrating afterward in the visitors'
locker room at Qwest Field. "It is what it is, but our main objective was to
the get 'W.' I'm just focusing on that," he said softly.

The Rams traded Hargrove, who missed two days of practice for what he termed "a
personal matter," to Buffalo on Oct. 16 - the day after Seattle edged the Rams
30-28 in St. Louis. Adeyanju's solid play helped make Hargrove expendable.

Adeyanju was working to contain the right side when fellow end Leonard Little
stormed in and drilled quarterback Seneca Wallace from behind. "It was an empty
set, with no backs in the backfield," Little explained. "They slid their line
away from me, which means I'm coming off the end free; nobody blocked me."

When Adeyanju saw the loose pigskin, he shed his blocker and scrambled after
it. "I really didn't see how (Little) came free," he said. "I just saw him come
across, get a good hit and the ball was on the ground. I just picked it up and
started running."

The 6-foot-4, 270-pound Adeyanju, who has 4.9 speed in the 40, headed for the
right sideline. Once he crossed midfield, only Seahawks tackle Tom Ashworth was
in the chase, and he was losing ground rapidly.

"Oh, he's not going to catch me. Don't worry about that," Adeyanju said.

The Seahawks had motored from their 28-yard line to the Rams 1 on the game's
opening series. A false-start penalty on third-and-goal pushed Seattle back to
the 6, and then Little's full-speed hit sent Adeyanju on his journey.

"It was a great way to start, especially after they were running pretty well
and we were able bounce back and flip it on them," linebacker Pisa Tinoisamoa
said. "I was excited for him. Good things happen when you work hard, though,
and that's why he got that."