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Thread: RamView, 9/23/2012: Bears 23, Rams 6 (Long)

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    RamView, 9/23/2012: Bears 23, Rams 6 (Long)

    RamView, September 23, 2012
    From the Couch
    (Report and opinions on the game.)
    Game #3: Bears 23, Rams 6

    The Rams have fought hard in 2012, but this week, they brought a knife to a gunfight, and got run off the field late by the Bear defense. And even if they had brought a gun, they would have shot themselves in the foot with it. They need to remember who they are, and get back to that, before the next showdown.

    Position by position:
    * QB: Sam Bradford (18-35-152, passer rating 39.2) never had a chance in this one. The Rams' first drive ended with the Bears blowing up a screen pass and sacking him. The next, Brandon Gibson dropped a perfect bomb inside the 10, then the Bears blew up a screen pass and sacked Bradford again. The fail point of the next drive was Bradford getting tripped by his own lineman getting rocked back off the line. It took until the last 2:00 of the first half for Bradford to even get the Rams into long FG range. He made one big play with his feet, scrambling for 10 after feeling blindside pressure from Julius Peppers. He also slung Steve Smith a slant for 15 and hit Danny Amendola for 10 on 3rd-and-7 to get the Rams there, settling for a FG after saving the Rams points a couple of times with smart throwaways. A 30-yard pass to Amendola got the Rams going quickly after halftime, but the drive bogged down on a Lance Kendricks false start, and CB Tim Jennings broke up an attempted slant to Gibson on 4th-and-1. In the 3rd, Bradford kept a FG drive alive with a perfect blitz read, hitting Chris Givens for 9 on 3rd-and-9. That brought the Rams within 10-6 with the 4th quarter approaching. Up till now, Bradford had shown accuracy, solid decision-making, field-reading and pocket presence, even under difficult conditions. There just wasn't much for him to work with. Now, though, everything fell apart. Another botched screen pass led to Bradford's fourth sack, though he had plenty of time to get rid of the ball. The drive ended with Bradford taking another sack, failing to get off an open dumpoff pass. Chicago extended their lead, then extended it again at Bradford's expense. Israel Idonije walloped him as he threw on 2nd down early in the 4th, and I wonder if Sam wasn't still seeing deep-dish pizzas dancing in his head when he tried to force a pass to Amendola that was tipped to Major Wright for a major pick-six. Another sack, and another pick, woefully short of Gibson, ended Bradford's desultory day. Even without blocking, open receivers or a running game, defense kept the Rams in the game for three quarters, though struggling to keep their heads above water. He deserves credit that it didn't come much, much sooner, but Bradford's breakdown starting late in the 3rd turned the tide against the Rams for good.

    * RB: Between his groin injury, a bad game plan and a lot of bad blocking, Steven Jackson (11-29) was well off of his most effective game. He kept the Rams' opening drive going on 3rd-and-1 by running through Julius Peppers and diving for the first down, but got buried in the backfield the next play thanks to poor blocking. It was that kind of a day. He helped set up the Rams' 2nd FG with a 13-yard run behind Robert Turner's strong pull block, but down 20-6 in the 4th, the Ram running game malfunctioned for the last time, with Jackson getting stuffed on a 1st-down screen pass, then losing 2 on 3rd-and-2 behind a Chicago traffic jam. Jackson received treatment on his groin injury between drives and could not have been near 100%. Daryl Richardson (4-16) bolted for 12 on his first carry, but the Bears never let him get going after that. It looked like the Rams tried to set up screen passes to him about half a dozen times, but the Bears blew them all up. Tough puzzle for the Rams to solve this week; it seems like they needed to get the ball to the running backs more, but they couldn't make a lot happen when they did, either.

    * Receivers: Well, we're back to late 2010 with the receivers: stop Danny Amendola and you stop the Rams; no one else will step up. Amendola was a fairly-quiet 5-60, with 11 fewer 1st-half catches than last week. He did convert a key third down in the 2:00 drill before halftime, and opened the 2nd half with a 30-yard catch and run down the seam, but got next to nothing in support. After a Cortland Finnegan interception, Chris Givens (2-9) short-armed a quick pass, nearly causing another pick, and Brandon Gibson (2-19) flatout dropped a bomb, just like the one he caught last week, that would have put the Rams inside the 10. Steve Smith (1-15) appears to be good for one catch a week, one more, though, than Austin Pettis (0-0) or Brian Quick (inactive). Quick was supposed to be the next Terrell Owens, huh? Apparently the Rams brass meant the current Terrell Owens. Lance Kendricks (3-18) had at least three passes dropped or knocked away from him. He lacks the “my ball” attitude a good tight end should have, and the Rams need a lot better than 18 yards on 7 targets out of him to have any passing game when Amendola gets shut down. No one was very good at getting open this week, but better play from Kendricks could have helped.

    * Offensive line: Spit and duct tape were enough to hold the offensive line together last week, but it completely collapsed in Chicago, failing in all aspects of the game from tackle to tackle. One of the biggest failings was to turn draft bust Amobi Okoye back into a blue-chipper. Okoye immediately beat a terrible Quinn Ojinnaka to the inside to drop Jackson for a loss on the opening drive, which he ended by sacking Bradford after smoking the disappointing Harvey Dahl. Steven Paea killed the next drive with the Bears' 2nd sack, stunning Ojinnaka with his initial punch and running right by him. Paea knocked Dahl off the line so quickly on 3rd down the next drive that he reeled back and tripped up Bradford for a loss. Hell, the Rams could have paid Adam Goldberg to do that, Harvey. The Rams finally got a little going right before halftime. Peppers did club Wayne Hunter down like a baby seal to pressure Bradford in the last 2:00, but Sam got away. Hunter's ankle is clearly bothering him. The left side got Bradford time to hit Amendola for another 1st down and get into FG range. Bradford was overrun by FOUR Bears, though, on the blown screen pass before the FG. The best (and possibly only) run block of the day was Robert Turner's excellent pull block in front of Jackson on a 13-yard run in the 3rd. That momentum did not last. Useless Ojinnaka got beat on most every play. Bradford held the ball too long on another failed screen pass and got sacked by Nick Roach. Peppers got to Bradford a few plays later, beating Dahl and Barry Richardson with a stunt after B-Rich got outmuscled by rookie Shea McClellin. B-Rich then let Israel Idonije pummel Bradford on an incomplete pass, which the QB was no doubt still feeling as he threw a pick-six the next play. Down 20-6, the Rams lose two on 3rd-and-2 after Peppers shuts down the right side and Dahl fails on a backside block. Idonije whipped B-Rich for the SIXTH sack of Bradford to end an ignominious day for the Rams' front line. Bradford's practically on pace to get sacked SEVENTY times this season; this line simply has to play better. The Bears have Pro Bowlers in their front seven, but Okoye and Paea aren't among them. The offense needs to be much more run-oriented to play to what strengths the tackles do have, it may be time to look to shuffle Ojinnaka out of the lineup, and please, somebody light a fire under Dahl's backside. He has played poorly in both Rams losses. Let's see how line coach Paul Boudreau answers this latest challenge.

    * Defensive line/LB: The defense kept the Rams in the game for three quarters, and was just a few plays from outright domination of the Bears offense, giving up just one TD and preventing Chicago from sustaining many drives. Chris Long and Robert Quinn both delivered big hits on Jay Cutler on Chicago’s very first drive, which only got as far as it did because of a STUPID special teams penalty and resulted in a FG. Long kept the hits coming, sacking Cutler with James Laurinaitis blitzing to force 3rd-and-17 the next possession. (The Rams blew the 3rd-and-17 play, but Cortland Finnegan stopped the Bears later with an interception.) Jermelle Cudjo showed up early with a run stop and a pressure that forced Cutler to throw a near-INT. Michael Bush (18-55) had his moments, and the Rams caught some luck with Matt Forte’s absence to an ankle injury. Kendall Langford’s blocker wiped him out on the game’s opening play as Bush rumbled up the middle for 12. For all his pass rush ability, Quinn was a run liability, to the point that Cudjo replaced him at RDE on some downs. Quinn made a poor effort against rookie fullback Evan Rodriguez, and Jo-Lonn Dunbar got wiped out, on a 13-yard Bush run later in the 1st. Bush humiliated Laurinaitis in the 2nd, gaining 12 by running right through him, but Kellen Heard (!) blew up the backfield the next play to drop Bush for a big loss, and Langford deflected Cutler’s 3rd-down pass. Chicago finally put a drive together on the Rams late in the half. Dunbar was way late getting over to cover Kahlil Bell on an 11-yard dumpoff. He got smeared, and Quinn driven back past center, opening up a big hole for Bell for 18. Bush finished off the drive with a 3-yard TD run, where Roberto Garza flattened a Ram LB attempting to blitz (I think Rocky McIntosh). The Rams repeatedly 3-and-outed the Bears in the 2nd half, though. Long got his second sack early, with Chicago brilliantly trying to block him with Bush. Barbara Bush had as good a chance of stopping Long as the Bears RB did. Laurinaitis and William Hayes weighed in a couple of times on 3-and-outs, stuffing Bell back-to-back on one 4th-quarter sequence. One big play they did give up was a 21-yard scramble by Cutler. Pass rush struggled that whole drive; here, with Quinn being blatantly held, Long running himself well out of the play and Langford getting pinned inside, Cutler took off through a big lane to set up a FG. The Rams have all the pieces of a shutdown defense here. Even with just two sacks, they kept good pressure on Cutler throughout the game. Even with the longer runs, they gave up only three yards a carry. They have a very solid secondary backing them up. For 50 minutes, they kept the team in the game, while the offense struggled just to get past midfield. It’ll be a shame if the offense keeps regressing back to 2011 and these kind of efforts keep going in vain.

    * Secondary: This unit’s played well enough, and been such a big part of the defensive effort, it deserves to be called the “primary”. Janoris Jenkins held his own against Brandon Marshall, covered well all day long, and supported well against the run. He made a pretty breakup of a slant pass for Earl Bennett that should have ended the Bears’ first drive, and nearly picked off a pass the next drive. Cortland Finnegan broke up a pass for Alshon Jeffery that same drive, and ended it with his third INT already this season, off a muff by Marshall. Finnegan now has as many picks as any Ram did all of last season. Quintin Mikell had a quietly-solid game, with a couple of good run stops, and no missed tackles that I could see. Bradley Fletcher saved the Rams 4 points in the 4th by breaking up a pass to Marshall at the goal line. Marshall, though, fooled him with a stop-and-go move to set up the Bush TD, and beat Finnegan deep on one of Mikell’s many blitzes for 34 to set up the final FG (though Finnegan was within a fingertip of making a play). The only truly bad play from the secondary this week: welcome back, Darian Stewart. Blitzing on 3rd-and-8 in the 2nd, Stewart made helmet-to-helmet contact with Cutler to keep alive what would become a touchdown drive. Like the front seven, all the pieces are here for a shutdown unit. One stupid play ruining the effort for everyone is what they’re going to have to find a way to prevent.

    * Special teams: Special teams played so smart and looked so well-coached the first two weeks that this week was a major disappointment. What the blue hell was Mario Haggan doing in the 1st when he blasted Bears punter Adam Podlesh to the ground? Way to hand the opponent three points, idiot. Nice veteran play, huh. On kickoffs, with Robbie Gould blasting everything through the back of the end zone past the Rams' underwhelming returners, why the hell didn't John Fassel have Greg Zuerlein do the same with Devin Hester? Hester had 30- and 37-yard returns with the Rams kicking RIGHT TO HIM; how stupid was that? And though Johnny Hekker showed some very nice ability to kill punts near the sideline, Hester also had 14- and 19-yard returns on punts directly to him. I guess that could have been lack of execution by Hekker, but whatever plan there was to contain Hester was half-good at best. We know Zuerlein had the leg to drill those deep kickoffs; he opened the scoring for the Rams with a 56-yard blast that had at least 5 more yards on it, and added a 46-yarder in the 3rd, showing no difficulty kicking outdoors for the first time as a pro. But really stupid, really avoidable special teams errors cost the Rams field position and points this week.

    * Strategery: The Rams are who we thought they were; Brian Schottenheimer, though, took all of three weeks to forget, with what looked like a really bad game plan. The Rams are supposed to be a balanced, power-running, ball-control passing offense, and had been quite successful for two weeks in that mode. This week, though, Schottenheimer decided to get pass-wacky. The Rams threw twice as much as they ran, even before they went into catch-up mode in the 4th. They rolled out a lot of 4- and 5-wide looks and empty backfields. Little emphasis on protecting Bradford there. And the game plan seemed to look downfield more than usual, inviting more pressure and hits on the QB. That, though, may have come about because the Rams couldn’t get their short options open. The screen game was a disaster; did the Rams successfully execute even one screen pass? The Bears knew every time a screen was coming, often before the Rams did, it seemed. Something was wrong there. And if Jackson’s injury was any reason for reducing the run in the game plan, it was a bad one. You’ve got Richardson; you’ve got Pead active for whatever reason; use them. Richardson’s speed might have been the one thing capable of opening up the field for the Rams. They kept running in Detroit even with a poor yards-per-carry average, and it kept them in the game. This week, Schottenheimer never really gave the run a chance, and the Rams got blown out.

    You’re never going to win a game handing away more points than you score. The Rams’ lack of composure this week in that regard was very disappointing. Haggan’s roughing the punter penalty in the 1st was one of the stupidest moves I’ve ever seen on a football field. Handed the Bears three points. Stewart’s roughing penalty of Cutler was as dumb as it was avoidable. Kept a TD drive alive on 3rd down, the antithesis of clutch. Bradford gave up a TD trying to force a pass he shouldn’t have. The Rams aren’t going anywhere if they don’t play a lot smarter than they did this week. With all the false starts and poor throws by Cutler, the Bears weren’t even all that sharp. At a minimum, this game should have been closer than it was. I think it’s fair to expect smarter play than this out of a Jeff Fisher team. I think this is also one of the rhythms a new regime goes through, and that Fisher will have addressed the bad mental mistakes well before I ever get this writeup posted. The Rams have enough challenges ahead without shooting themselves repeatedly in the foot, so Fisher needs to get this problem cleaned up quickly.

    * Upon further review: The NFL's answer to last week's awful officiating must have been to bring in referees from the year 1944, judging by Jerry Hughes' awarding the ball to “St. Looie” after reviewing the (non)fumble at the end of Finnegan's interception. That looked like the only call that challenged this crew. Unfortunately for the Rams, all the personal foul calls looked correct. The foul on Peppers for shoving D-Rich late was legit, coming as it did well after the whistle compared to the other chippy stuff. The home crowd wanted a false start when Paea jumped offside in the 1st, but that was legal hand movement on Ojinnaka's part. The Rams really could have used a call on Cutler's big scramble; Quinn was brutally held, but Hughes' crew looked like Hall of Famers compared to the buffoons who did last week's game. Grade: B

    * Cheers: Dick Stockton and John Lynch weren't terrible on the game broadcast, but I do question their show prep. Neither knew how to pronounce Jermelle Cudjo’s name, for instance. And after all the hubbub last week about Fisher improperly challenging the Jackson goal line (non)fumble, Lynch ought to have known better than to say that Fisher should have challenged the ruling on Finnegan's (non)fumble. The coach can't challenge a turnover, remember? At least they patched Mike Pereira in to get clarification on how the play should have been called. As long as the league has the rent-a-refs, any time they go under the hood, they should just call Pereira in L.A. to make the official ruling. Think anyone would notice?

    * Who’s next?: 2004 will always be a memorable year for Rams fans, not just because it was the last time the team made the postseason, but because the Rams positively tormented the Seattle Seahawks that season, beating them three times, twice in their place, including in the first round of the playoffs. Since then, though, the torment has been all Rams Nation's, with Seattle having won 13 of the last 14 against the Rams. It's time for Jeff Fisher to make this a rivalry again. Seattle won 24-7 the last time they were here, with Josh McDaniels calling an irrationally pass-wacky game plan. The Rams need to do better than that.

    The Seahawks present a lot of the same challenges the Bears did, though. It’s hard to say Seattle has anything other than the best secondary in the NFL when they had three DBs in the last Pro Bowl. It’s a big, physical backfield, with Brandon Browner as the lockdown corner, Kam Chancellor bringing the thunder at strong safety, where he’s one of the best in the league, and Earl Thomas providing the lightning at free. All of the Dallas WRs had subpar games in Seattle’s 24-7 week 2 win. The Seattle backs took away the sidelines, but were vulnerable in the middle of the field, especially on passes to the TEs. If Jason Witten hadn’t dropped 3-4 passes, that game could have been a lot different. (Not that I’m expecting Lance Kendricks to turn into an NFL-quality TE by next Sunday.) Rams Nation is going to be left hoping, again, that Danny Amendola can get open enough times in the slot, likely against Marcus Trufant, to keep Bradford from taking another beating. Which, problem. The Rams haven’t had an answer for Seahawk DE Chris Clemons for several years now, though after trying to block him last year with the likes of Mark LeVoir and Kevin Hughes, even a gimpy Wayne Hunter represents an upgrade. They appear to be using first-round pick Bruce Irvin mainly to spell Clemons. Irvin’s no threat to bull-rush anyone, but will give the Rams more than enough trouble with his speed. Seattle was potent against Dallas with blitzes right up the middle. They also get good pass pressure up the middle from former Jeff Fisher pupil Jason Jones. Tony Romo got away from many sacks that Sam Bradford can’t, meaning the Rams have a week to make a major turnaround at both guard positions. Seattle’s huge up front, too; as I’ve said in the past, they basically start 3 DTs, making them hard to run against. Dallas had success with misdirection, though, and Demarco Murray missed a lot of cutback lanes; Daryl Richardson will be the NFL player of the week if he can find and hit those. Like it or not, the Rams are going to have to re-commit to the running game, and do as much with it as they can, or we’re in for a long spell of games just like this week’s. The Rams’ special teams better be wide awake Sunday, too; Seattle jumped on top of Dallas early with a forced fumble on the opening kickoff, followed by a blocked punt recovery for a TD. Take care of the ball or Seattle will take care of you.

    This would indeed be the perfect week for Michael Brockers to return from his preseason injury, as is being rumored. The Rams have been too soft up the middle, right where Marshawn Lynch is at his beastliest. Smaller than Steven Jackson, but every bit as strong; gang-tackling him is mandatory. The offensive line of Breno Giacomini, converted defensive lineman J.R. Sweezy, Max Unger, Paul McQuistan and Frank Omiyale (replacing injured-yet-again Russell Okung), is anonymous even as offensive linemen go, but they’re a cohesive unit that can push people around. Sure did it to Dallas. Career backup Omiyale even held his own against Demarcus Ware. Woman-beating line coach Tom Cable has that group playing well. Seattle wants to strike first with that physical running game to keep the pressure off of rookie QB Russell Wilson; the Rams, in turn, need to make Wilson beat them. For all his athletic skill, there is little mistaking the effect of Wilson’s lack of height on his game. Get a man in his face, get your hands up on defense, take away his throwing lanes. His downfield passes float when he has to throw over the line, and he’ll throw right at defenders because he can’t see over the line. Wilson’s not the threat as a primary runner that RG3 is, but he can definitely beat you with his feet when pressured, and Sidney Rice is actually healthy, adding a dimension as a #1-quality receiver that Seattle opponents haven’t had to prepare for much recently. But Jeff Fisher and the Rams defensive staff should still have a field day scheming up ways for Wilson to make mistakes, if, big if, they can slow down the running game.

    Fisher and the Rams have got quite the challenge ahead of them this week. Coming off their first real stinker of the season, they’re going to have to prove themselves to the fan base all over again, and against a tough divisional opponent they rarely beat. Well, no time like the present, I say. The best way to revitalize Rams football is to get competitive in the division again, with smart, hard-nosed football. It’ll be a big opportunity for Fisher to show what the 2012 Rams are going to be all about. I doubt he whiffs on this one.

    -- Mike
    Game stats from nfl.com


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    Re: RamView, 9/23/2012: Bears 23, Rams 6 (Long)

    Franke, more than once you discribe Gibson's dropping a "perfect bomb". A perfect bomb is thrown over the shoulder, in stride. Bradford rarely throws long this way. For whatever reason he throws at the receivers back, forcing him to turn around to catch the ball in midair, ultimately landing on his backside, thus ending the play good or bad and rarely reaching the endzone.
    With all the gravitas of Jackie Treehorn.

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    Re: RamView, 9/23/2012: Bears 23, Rams 6 (Long)

    Quote Originally Posted by live4ramin View Post
    Franke, more than once you discribe Gibson's dropping a "perfect bomb". A perfect bomb is thrown over the shoulder, in stride. Bradford rarely throws long this way. For whatever reason he throws at the receivers back, forcing him to turn around to catch the ball in midair, ultimately landing on his backside, thus ending the play good or bad and rarely reaching the endzone.
    That's old school, players today turn their bodies and go attack the ball at the highest point. That ball from Bradford was perfect.

    The best in the game turning his body to face the QB and going and attacking the ball at it's highest point.


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    Re: RamView, 9/23/2012: Bears 23, Rams 6 (Long)

    It's old school to hit a player in stride? You must be joking?

    On topic: The ball might not have gotten Gibson into the endzone, but it was a well placed ball that he should have caught. Only safe place to place it really, with the safety commnig in over the top.

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    Re: RamView, 9/23/2012: Bears 23, Rams 6 (Long)

    Quote Originally Posted by emuen View Post
    It's old school to hit a player in stride? You must be joking?
    That pass was not a 50 yard bomb where you throw it out there and have the guy go get it. That ball was in a prefect spot to go attack the ball. So no I'm not joking. Gibson played the ball correctly he turned his body and went up to attack the ball at his highest point but dropped it.

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    Re: RamView, 9/23/2012: Bears 23, Rams 6 (Long)

    Here is a good write up on Gibby dropped balls.

    Brandon Gibson, progress interrupted - Turf Show Times

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    Re: RamView, 9/23/2012: Bears 23, Rams 6 (Long)

    Well, the midair/land on your ass/no yards after the catch/see you later endzone catch may be new school in St. Louie, but not in the National Futbol League. I guess what I'm saying is this particular throw is indicative of Sam Bradford. It's a bad habit. He does it with all his "speed receivers". Bradford almost never throws to his receivers in stride, especially on left sideline routes. I don't know if it's a matter of range or one of time to wait for the play to develop. Maybe both. It looked on this particular play that Gibson was in position to make the running catch for a score, but the window closed and he eagerly went back for a chance to make the now more popular land on your ass catch.
    Last edited by live4ramin; -09-25-2012 at 05:18 PM.
    With all the gravitas of Jackie Treehorn.

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    Re: RamView, 9/23/2012: Bears 23, Rams 6 (Long)

    I'm not sure why Gibson is even turning around. That looks like it's going to be a deep corner route, and it looks like Bradford's pass is going to drop right in over his outside shoulder, but Gibson goes for the "land on your ass" catch instead. Maybe the pass hung up there too long, not sure.

    If not perfect, certainly very catchable, I think we're all agreed there.

    --Mike
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