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Thread: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

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    Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    There ARE no "silver linings". I chose this for the thread title simply because most people expect me to find at least one good thing in every game.

    This time, there was no "diamond in the goat's butt", so to speak.

    Instead, we were witness to ineptitude, inexperience, lackadaisical performances, extremely puzzling play calling, and way too damn many injuries, including a serious one.

    Last night, I was on facebook shortly before the game. When kickoff rolled around, I set the laptop down, leaving facebook open. It didn't take long for me to hear the audible notification of people posting their thoughts. Most of these posts seemed to follow a similar theme, although there was a few others that didn't make any sense to anyone except the poster. On second thought, most of the posts didn't make sense.

    The majority of the posts were blaming Bradford. I can understand how people who don't know much about football are willing to blame the QB for every little problem, but one person (who happens to be a member of this forum) really got me scratching my head: they posted about how it was all Bradford's fault that Laurinaitis dropped the two possible interceptions. Excuse me, but it really takes a special kind of stupid to go that far.

    The rest of the posts were the usual ignorant rants from people that either have no clue about the Rams or St. Louis, or both. People were posting about how the Rams needed to move to LA so they could win a game (gee...I never knew winning required a certain physical location), or they posted about how the dome was less than half full (yes, before 5:00 PM and after 11:00 PM, I am sure it was, but during the game, there were over 56,000 people there), or they were talking about how there was whiners fans in the seats (I didn't know we discriminated against people with bad taste by not letting them into the dome). My favorite "stupid comment" of the night was when some person posted about how a fan was wearing a Rams jersey, but a Cardinals hat. I guess he and his friends that were making a big deal out of that don't realize that St. Louis is home to the St. Louis Cardinals, who, hopefully, will clinch their division later today.

    The one thing about all of these comments is that they are ALL wrong. It's not Bradford. It's not St. Louis. It's not empty seats, or even fans wearing a hat that doesn't match their jersey. What it IS, is that the Rams had taken a couple of steps forward, but since last year, have taken several steps in the wrong direction.

    Our offensive coordinator, Brian Schottenheimer, is well known in the NFL. His most notable accomplishment must be the way he took the New York Jets offense, and led them into insignificance and mediocrity. Last year, he actually brought a new sense of hope to the Rams, and this translated into an improved product on the field. However, it seems that his game plan and offensive scheme has run the same course that it did in New York - directly into a brick wall.

    Our defensive coordinator, Tim Walton, is not as well known as our OC. He is, however, known for being the secondary coach in Detroit. Somehow, I don't really recall any accolades he received for improving the Lion's defense.

    These two are the places we need to begin looking to find a place to lay the blame. Since they are responsible for their respective players on the field, it is only logical to start at the top.

    Walton seems to be in over his head. Last season, our defense had taken some huge strides, and were capable of stopping almost anything thrown their way. For evidence, just think back to last season's matchups against the whiners - the team that represented the NFC in the Super Bowl couldn't beat us, and it was due to our defense. This season, it seems that Tim Walton has decided to use the "wet paper bag" scheme; this is where he coaches the players to act like they are a wet paper bag, and dare our opponents to get through them.

    Schottenheimer is doing exactly what he did in New York. He is putting together a game plan that makes little or no sense to the fans. Third down and a yard to go? Yeah, let's stretch the field instead of getting a first down. First down? Yeah, let's run for a half a yard instead of opening up our offense.

    Our offensive line is also less than stellar - in fact, it's less than pedestrian. It's flat out crappy. True, we had four games without a single sack - then, someone told the front line to open up the door. Saffold didn't like being shifted to right tackle, but had the talent and ability to be more than adequate for the task. But, as we all fear will happen in preseason, he was injured. He came back, but was again injured. Enter Joe Barksdale - serviceable, dependable, but not starting tackle material at this time. Oh, yes, he is a good backup, but not ready for prime time at this point in his career. Jake Long - while hyped - is no Orlando Pace, nor will he ever be. Long is one of the better left tackles in the league, but in my opinion, he is not "elite". He seems to be the right fit for the Rams on the blind side for now, but Max Starks is an embarrassing memory of what he used to be.

    Our offensive line, which at one time seemed to be improving, is not much different than it was in 2007 when Marc Bulger was taking so many hits. I know some of you will remember me saying we HAD to fix the offensive line BEFORE we got a new QB. I told you Bulger was NOT the problem. Well, the Rams didn't listen to me, they brought in Bradford, a young, highly rated QB, and put him behind a line that had more holes than a pound of Swiss cheese. Guess what? He couldn't do it - he couldn't make the Rams win.

    Now, we are back to the same place we used to be. Many "fans" (including those on ClanRam) are wanting to replace Bradford. Seriously? You could put Bob Waterfield, Kurt Warner, AND Roman Gabriel all at once behind our O-line, and with the lack of time along with the high-school level play calling from Schottenheimer, and the three of them wouldn't be able to do anything, either!

    So what do we need to do?

    First, we need to get together and let Fisher know we aren't happy. I'm sure he knows this, but he needs this to be reinforced. Let him know the offense and defense are NOT performing up to their ability. Tell him to take over the game planning and play calling. I don't know if he has the authority, but he needs to bench the OC and DC.

    Second, we need to step back and realize that this may only be a temporary issue. I don't think it's going to solve itself, but we need to put some trust in Fisher, and let him try to find some answers.

    Third - and this is the most important of all - we ALL need to realize that it isn't the fault of one player or one coach. Vince Lombardi himself couldn't coach Tony Banks into being a Super Bowl quarterback. Isaac Bruce couldn't catch every ball. Marshall Faulk couldn't always get past the line of scrimmage. It's the entire team - and they are in a downward spiral. They had the enthusiasm, they were convinced they could come out and conquer the NFC West...then, something happened. They lost confidence. Their performance began sliding downhill - and in Dallas, they didn't seem to put forth the effort to even TRY to stop the Cowboys for most of the game. Last night, it just got worse.

    I know I am not happy with the 2013 Rams. But, they are still my team, and I will continue supporting them no matter what. I hope you are fan enough to do the same - win or lose.


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    Re: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    Nice write up, agree 100%


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    Re: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    Quote Originally Posted by RamsFanSam View Post
    I know I am not happy with the 2013 Rams. But, they are still my team, and I will continue supporting them no matter what. I hope you are fan enough to do the same - win or lose.
    They are still my team - always will be - can't help it. I'll admit though, that I sometimes wonder if perhaps there isn't a fine line between loyalty and stupidity. My wife, by the way, isn't wondering at all ..
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    Re: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    I agree on some points and disagree on others.

    A point I agree on is Schottenheimer. Didnt impress me in NY, scratched my head when Fisher brought him on, and now he smells of Front Office politics akin to our recent draft day decisions.

    I agree on the Efensive Coordinator. How do we go from really good to really bad minus 1 safety and 1 LB? And yes Efensive is the correct spelling as we have NO D.

    The point I disagree with is Bradford. If Warner were here-- he'd audible out of less favorable plays to put the team in a better opportunity to succeed. I guarantee you if Peyton Manning were our QB we'd see vastly imporived results. Same with any other elite QB.

    Sam has had a world of opportunity to display leadership and the 'Will to Win'. Im not saying he needs to pass for 300+ yards a game with 2+ TDS per game, but what he hasnt shown is that ability to flat out MAKE A PLAY.

    It could be he has succumbed to Pavlov's Theory and become conditioned to look for a receiver thats just breached the line of scrimmage, as that's pretty much what his career stats show regardless of who has been coaching up, down, sideways, and all around.
    Its been proven that a great QB can take a poor team and turn them around by being a PLAYMAKER.

    A QB that is a PLAYMAKER then becomes infectous, and the result is the rest of the team responds to him and starts to make plays themselves.
    It's time that the Bradford supporters here look deep down and see whats really in front of us. Are we going to coddle Bradford at the expense of franchise success? Or would we rather have a QB that produces at a high level like MANY who either joined the NFL after Bradford or just came into the league?
    Last edited by punahou; -09-27-2013 at 07:19 PM.
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    Re: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    Quote Originally Posted by punahou View Post
    I agree on some points and disagree on others.

    A point I agree on is Schottenheimer. Didnt impress me in NY, scratched my head when Fisher brought him on, and now he smells of Front Office politics akin to our recent draft day decisions.

    I agree on the Efensive Coordinator. How do we go from really good to really bad minus 1 safety and 1 LB? And yes Efensive is the correct spelling as we have NO D.

    The point I disagree with is Bradford. If Warner were here-- he'd audible out of less favorable plays to put the team in a better opportunity to succeed. I guarantee you if Peyton Manning were our QB we'd see vastly imporived results. Same with any other elite QB.

    Sam has had a world of opportunity to display leadership and the 'Will to Win'. Im not saying he needs to pass for 300+ yards a game with 2+ TDS per game, but what he hasnt shown is that ability to flat out MAKE A PLAY.

    It could be he has succumbed to Pavlov's Theory and become conditioned to look for a receiver thats just breached the line of scrimmage, as that's pretty much what his career stats show regardless of who has been coaching up, down, sideways, and all around.
    Its been proven that a great QB can take a poor team and turn them around by being a PLAYMAKER.

    A QB that is a PLAYMAKER then becomes infectous, and the result is the rest of the team responds to him and starts to make plays themselves.
    It's time that the Bradford supporters here look deep down and see whats really in front of us. Are we going to coddle Bradford at the expense of franchise success? Or would we rather have a QB that produces at a high level like MANY who either joined the NFL after Bradford or just came into the league?
    Let's look at your stement about Bradford for a minute.

    You say "If Warner were here-- he'd audible out of less favorable plays to put the team in a better opportunity to succeed. I guarantee you if Peyton Manning were our QB we'd see vastly imporived results. Same with any other elite QB." I want to know...HOW?

    Steven Jackson was a multi-faceted part of our offense. Not only could he run, he could catch. One thing about Jackson that most people don't think of is his blocking ability. Watch any of the GSOT games, and you will see Faulk going up against guys twice his size. Watch any game with Steven, and you will see him blocking some of the best pass rushers in the NFL. Do you think Cunningham or Richardson are on the same level as either Faulk or Jackson in ANY way, including blocks? No one does.

    There are 11 men on offense. Since the QB can't block for himself, that means only 10 can block. Take away one more (since someone has to either carry the ball or catch a pass) and you are down to 9. Now, take away Jackson's blocking ability, and you are down to 8.

    Now, consider the plays that are being called in - each one puts at least two potential WR's downfield, meaning that we are now down to 7 potential blockers. OK, so far, 7 blockers against 4 rushers - what's the problem?

    Well, the FIRST issue is that it doesn't work like that. Consider that during a running play or a play action pass, there will always be a lead blocker in addition to the running back. This cuts the 7 potential blockers down to 5 - and that is where our problem gets multiplied.

    IF we had the Donut Brothers, Orlando Pace, and Ryan Tucker out there, THEN I wouldn't be defending Bradford. Since we don't have a line like that - well, we have a problem.

    Do you know how long a QB can hang onto a ball before he is almost guaranteed to be sacked? THREE SECONDS. Now, time is relative, meaning that three seconds seems like a LONG time in some ways, but in others, it isn't long at all. Let's tear apart three seconds.

    Tavon Austin can run 40 yards in 4.34 seconds, meaning he can likely cover 23-25 yards in only 3 seconds, right? WRONG. That 4.34 second run was in ideal conditions - straight line, no blocking, no route, not on turf, no worry about some fat, sweaty, 300 pound behemoth grabbing him by the nuts and the face mask and twisting him to the ground. In reality, those three seconds after the ball is snapped mean a lot more work for Tavon. First, he must deal with hits and pushes, slowing him down. Then he must run his route - which is likely obstructed by a defender, and deal with someone shadowing him. Since his route is likely not going to be a straight line, he probably will only be able to cover at best 15 yards. AT BEST. Then, on top of all of that, he has to deal with catching a ball under pressure...IF it gets to him on time and on target.

    The offensive line is even more complicated, so I will cover the line as a group instead of individually.

    The offensive line has to face a group of at least three rushers - and they don't always know where the pressure will be coming from. In most cases, there will be (on passing plays) at least one pass rusher. This defender has only one goal: hit the QB behind the line as hard and as fast as he can. Consider the average size of the offensive line is 307 pounds or so. Their 40 times are quite slow compared to many other players on the field, but their job isn't to run, it's to stand still or slowly push. Now, our defensive line is built quite differently - their job is to hit hard, push hard, and break through that line. The average weight of our front four is 292.75 pounds. Most people would look at this and think that it's about even - but it isn't. A lot of other factors come into play - like who hits hardest, lowest, and with the best angle. Advantage actually goes to the defense. Let's add a pass rusher in addition to the usual DE's, say a safety. Safeties have to be fast (they usually match up with WR's quite well), and can easily embarrass most offensive linemen. There will also be a linebacker, and they are usually a combination of the defensive linemen and a safety - meaning they are quick AND powerful. Now, you've got four linemen defending against the DT's and the DE's. You still need someone to block the safety and the linebacker. OK, you've got one offensive lineman left, so he handles one of them. Consider what it's like to try and stop a kid who's running towards you at full speed - now imagine that kid being more than 200 pounds and running at close to the same speed as Tavon, and you can imagine what trying to stop a safety is like. What about the linebacker? Well, Faulk could stop them - but not for long. Jackson? Yes - he was a fairly even match for any defensive player in the NFL. He may not have weighed the same as a defensive end, but he had a body built to stop a freight train at full speed. Our backs we have now would have issues trying to stop anyone over 200 pounds or moving at full speed. Now, about that three seconds...

    For three full seconds, these offensive linemen have to keep their hands inside the numbers, push 300 pounds that are pushing back, and keep from losing any ground. The "open" lineman can either help out a struggling blocker, or keep his eyes open and TRY to make a play against a rusher. The (usually) lone back has to rush forward and attack a running safety or linebacker (or other defender), anticipate any cuts, and hold him away from the pocket for three seconds.

    I don't know if you do much lifting, but I do. A few times a week, I have to lift and position a 250 pound insulated stainless steel wire trough over my head, and hold it in perfect alignment until we can secure it in place. I usually have at least one other person helping me do this, in addition to to someone who screws it in place. I'm not exactly a weightlifter, but I am not tiny, either. I can lift those suckers my myself if I have to, but I can't even imagine what it would be like to hold one of those troughs stationary if it was pushing back. It's hard enough just to hold it over my head for 5 or 6 seconds until one single screw can be put in place. Could you hold 250 pounds in place that is pushing back on you as hard as you are pushing on it and keep it up for three seconds while it was trying to fight you and push you aside, keep your hands inside the numbers, and not be pushed back?

    Now, let's look at the QB. This will be the easiest myth to tear down.

    The QB has 20 seconds to get the 10 other guys into a huddle after the last play is ended, receive a play being called in from the sideline, discuss the options with the OC, tell the other 10 players, get back to the line of scrimmage, read the defense, choose whether to run the primary play or an alternate play. He may or may not be given an option to run an audible in addition to the primary and secondary play...it is NOT usually up to the QB whether or not to do this. Then, he calls the count. Now, this is where things happen fast. I'm going to put this in a numbered list for simplicity.
    1. The entire offense - including the QB, must be set and not flinch before the snap.
    2. The defense must be continually read and evaluated during the count.
    3. The ball must be snapped cleanly, and put directly into the QB's hands - not too high, not to low, not off to one side. ANY variable in this, no matter how minor, will cause a timing variable which may throw off the entire planned play.

    Now, it gets interesting, because there is the illusion of time being slowed down.

    4. By the time the QB gets the ball, there is a minimum of 1500 pounds headed straight towards the QB.

    Now comes a chain of events that MUST be perfect in order for a successful play.

    5. The Qb must have complete trust in the people on his blind side to prevent anyone from getting past them.
    6. IF the snap was perfect (including the position of the laces), and;
    7. IF Tavon can break free, and make the cut needed for the route, and;
    8. IF every offensive lineman can hit and hold (or preferably make a forward push) every defensive lineman in front of the line of scrimmage, and;
    9. IF the running back can successfully make a block against his assigned defender, and;
    10. IF no one commits a penalty (holding, etc.), and;
    11. IF Tavon can make it to his assigned point on the field;

    THEN:

    12. The QB can verify the timing of the route (while Tavon is still in motion), and;
    13. IF Tavon is open, and;
    14. IF no one has broken the offensive line;

    THEN:

    15. The QB can pass the ball.

    Wait, it's not over yet! There are STILL more variables!

    16. IF the QB isn't hit while making the throw, and;
    17. IF a defender doesn't get his hands up and tips the pass, and;
    18. IF no one holds, hits, or otherwise screws with Tavon, and;
    19. IF Tavon can catch and hold onto the ball long enough to make a "football move" or carry it to the ground without the ball making any motion whatsoever, and;
    20. IF he can secure the ball enough to keep it from being stripped;

    THEN:

    21. We have a completed pass.

    Now, if ANY of these 21 things does not happen perfectly, we have "fans" who start complaining about how lousy of a QB Bradford is. The problem is, they don't bother to think the issue through, and are willing to throw away a player for their inability to see the entire picture. Now, tell me - is the QB responsible for ALL 21 of these things going perfect, or is it a team effort?
    Last edited by RamsFanSam; -09-28-2013 at 01:39 PM.

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    Re: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    Am sure FO and the owner knows the Ram nation is none to happy. Boos and sarcastic cheering is the first clue that FO/owner ship notices fan discontent. But what will really get their attention is diminishing revenues in the good old cash box--want to see a regime change that more then anything that will bring it on. Billionaires don't become billionaires losing money...I personally wish I knew how to send back to Ram Park this years jersey--just to reinforce my discontent. But luckily, declining attendance at home games will make that point for me

    Right now the Rams team is more fit for fantasy football. T. Johnson/Ogletree/Ray Ray all are showing signs of promise...Cook is a known asset, and T. Austin has potential...all are great on paper if your into make-believe and fantasy. Sadly the Rams are 1-2 (having their heads handed to them in the last 2 games)--that's REALITY. Ownership need to have a sit down with the brain trust and explain another reality, a MOST unpleasant reality...seriously its carrot & stick time, but the carrot this time is "you get to keep your jobs"
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    Re: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    Quote Originally Posted by RamsFanSam View Post
    Let's look at your stement about Bradford for a minute.

    You say "If Warner were here-- he'd audible out of less favorable plays to put the team in a better opportunity to succeed. I guarantee you if Peyton Manning were our QB we'd see vastly imporived results. Same with any other elite QB." I want to know...HOW?

    Steven Jackson was a multi-faceted part of our offense. Not only could he run, he could catch. One thing about Jackson that most people don't think of is his blocking ability. Watch any of the GSOT games, and you will see Faulk going up against guys twice his size. Watch any game with Steven, and you will see him blocking some of the best pass rushers in the NFL. Do you think Cunningham or Richardson are on the same level as either Faulk or Jackson in ANY way, including blocks? No one does.

    There are 11 men on offense. Since the QB can't block for himself, that means only 10 can block. Take away one more (since someone has to either carry the ball or catch a pass) and you are down to 9. Now, take away Jackson's blocking ability, and you are down to 8.

    Now, consider the plays that are being called in - each one puts at least two potential WR's downfield, meaning that we are now down to 7 potential blockers. OK, so far, 7 blockers against 4 rushers - what's the problem?

    Well, the FIRST issue is that it doesn't work like that. Consider that during a running play or a play action pass, there will always be a lead blocker in addition to the running back. This cuts the 7 potential blockers down to 5 - and that is where our problem gets multiplied.

    IF we had the Donut Brothers, Orlando Pace, and Ryan Tucker out there, THEN I wouldn't be defending Bradford. Since we don't have a line like that - well, we have a problem.

    Do you know how long a QB can hang onto a ball before he is almost guaranteed to be sacked? THREE SECONDS. Now, time is relative, meaning that three seconds seems like a LONG time in some ways, but in others, it isn't long at all. Let's tear apart three seconds.

    Tavon Austin can run 40 yards in 4.34 seconds, meaning he can likely cover 23-25 yards in only 3 seconds, right? WRONG. That 4.34 second run was in ideal conditions - straight line, no blocking, no route, not on turf, no worry about some fat, sweaty, 300 pound behemoth grabbing him by the nuts and the face mask and twisting him to the ground. In reality, those three seconds after the ball is snapped mean a lot more work for Tavon. First, he must deal with hits and pushes, slowing him down. Then he must run his route - which is likely obstructed by a defender, and deal with someone shadowing him. Since his route is likely not going to be a straight line, he probably will only be able to cover at best 15 yards. AT BEST. Then, on top of all of that, he has to deal with catching a ball under pressure...IF it gets to him on time and on target.

    The offensive line is even more complicated, so I will cover the line as a group instead of individually.

    The offensive line has to face a group of at least three rushers - and they don't always know where the pressure will be coming from. In most cases, there will be (on passing plays) at least one pass rusher. This defender has only one goal: hit the QB behind the line as hard and as fast as he can. Consider the average size of the offensive line is 307 pounds or so. Their 40 times are quite slow compared to many other players on the field, but their job isn't to run, it's to stand still or slowly push. Now, our defensive line is built quite differently - their job is to hit hard, push hard, and break through that line. The average weight of our front four is 292.75 pounds. Most people would look at this and think that it's about even - but it isn't. A lot of other factors come into play - like who hits hardest, lowest, and with the best angle. Advantage actually goes to the defense. Let's add a pass rusher in addition to the usual DE's, say a safety. Safeties have to be fast (they usually match up with WR's quite well), and can easily embarrass most offensive linemen. There will also be a linebacker, and they are usually a combination of the defensive linemen and a safety - meaning they are quick AND powerful. Now, you've got four linemen defending against the DT's and the DE's. You still need someone to block the safety and the linebacker. OK, you've got one offensive lineman left, so he handles one of them. Consider what it's like to try and stop a kid who's running towards you at full speed - now imagine that kid being more than 200 pounds and running at close to the same speed as Tavon, and you can imagine what trying to stop a safety is like. What about the linebacker? Well, Faulk could stop them - but not for long. Jackson? Yes - he was a fairly even match for any defensive player in the NFL. He may not have weighed the same as a defensive end, but he had a body built to stop a freight train at full speed. Our backs we have now would have issues trying to stop anyone over 200 pounds or moving at full speed. Now, about that three seconds...

    For three full seconds, these offensive linemen have to keep their hands inside the numbers, push 300 pounds that are pushing back, and keep from losing any ground. The "open" lineman can either help out a struggling blocker, or keep his eyes open and TRY to make a play against a rusher. The (usually) lone back has to rush forward and attack a running safety or linebacker (or other defender), anticipate any cuts, and hold him away from the pocket for three seconds.

    I don't know if you do much lifting, but I do. A few times a week, I have to lift and position a 250 pound insulated stainless steel wire trough over my head, and hold it in perfect alignment until we can secure it in place. I usually have at least one other person helping me do this, in addition to to someone who screws it in place. I'm not exactly a weightlifter, but I am not tiny, either. I can lift those suckers my myself if I have to, but I can't even imagine what it would be like to hold one of those troughs stationary if it was pushing back. It's hard enough just to hold it over my head for 5 or 6 seconds until one single screw can be put in place. Could you hold 250 pounds in place that is pushing back on you as hard as you are pushing on it and keep it up for three seconds while it was trying to fight you and push you aside, keep your hands inside the numbers, and not be pushed back?

    Now, let's look at the QB. This will be the easiest myth to tear down.

    The QB has 20 seconds to get the 10 other guys into a huddle after the last play is ended, receive a play being called in from the sideline, discuss the options with the OC, tell the other 10 players, get back to the line of scrimmage, read the defense, choose whether to run the primary play or an alternate play. He may or may not be given an option to run an audible in addition to the primary and secondary play...it is NOT usually up to the QB whether or not to do this. Then, he calls the count. Now, this is where things happen fast. I'm going to put this in a numbered list for simplicity.
    1. The entire offense - including the QB, must be set and not flinch before the snap.
    2. The defense must be continually read and evaluated during the count.
    3. The ball must be snapped cleanly, and put directly into the QB's hands - not too high, not to low, not off to one side. ANY variable in this, no matter how minor, will cause a timing variable which may throw off the entire planned play.

    Now, it gets interesting, because there is the illusion of time being slowed down.

    4. By the time the QB gets the ball, there is a minimum of 1500 pounds headed straight towards the QB.

    Now comes a chain of events that MUST be perfect in order for a successful play.

    5. The Qb must have complete trust in the people on his blind side to prevent anyone from getting past them.
    6. IF the snap was perfect (including the position of the laces), and;
    7. IF Tavon can break free, and make the cut needed for the route, and;
    8. IF every offensive lineman can hit and hold (or preferably make a forward push) every defensive lineman in front of the line of scrimmage, and;
    9. IF the running back can successfully make a block against his assigned defender, and;
    10. IF no one commits a penalty (holding, etc.), and;
    11. IF Tavon can make it to his assigned point on the field;

    THEN:

    12. The QB can verify the timing of the route (while Tavon is still in motion), and;
    13. IF Tavon is open, and;
    14. IF no one has broken the offensive line;

    THEN:

    15. The QB can pass the ball.

    Wait, it's not over yet! There are STILL more variables!

    16. IF the QB isn't hit while making the throw, and;
    17. IF a defender doesn't get his hands up and tips the pass, and;
    18. IF no one holds, hits, or otherwise screws with Tavon, and;
    19. IF Tavon can catch and hold onto the ball long enough to make a "football move" or carry it to the ground without the ball making any motion whatsoever, and;
    20. IF he can secure the ball enough to keep it from being stripped;

    THEN:

    21. We have a completed pass.

    Now, if ANY of these 21 things does not happen perfectly, we have "fans" who start complaining about how lousy of a QB Bradford is. The problem is, they don't bother to think the issue through, and are willing to throw away a player for their inability to see the entire picture. Now, tell me - is the QB responsible for ALL 21 of these things going perfect, or is it a team effort?

    All I can respond to that is other teams do that week in, and week out. It's not as riddled with permutations and calculations as its being made out to be.


    Its snap the ball, know your assignments, run, pass and run or catch.
    Or on defense, go at ball snap, roar, tackle.

    Its football-- that most of these guy have been playing since wipe their nose times.
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    Re: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    Quote Originally Posted by punahou View Post
    All I can respond to that is other teams do that week in, and week out. It's not as riddled with permutations and calculations as its being made out to be.


    Its snap the ball, know your assignments, run, pass and run or catch.
    Or on defense, go at ball snap, roar, tackle.

    Its football-- that most of these guy have been playing since wipe their nose times.
    Yes. But - it is NOT all on one man. It takes the entire team. Everyone must do their job and the timing must be right.


    That is my point.

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    Re: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    Quote Originally Posted by RamsFanSam View Post
    Yes. But - it is NOT all on one man. It takes the entire team. Everyone must do their job and the timing must be right.


    That is my point.
    It is not all on one guy.....but any starting NFL QB should make the play when he has the opportunity to do so..... Sam ha snot done this enough times IMO. He will never be more then a middle of the road QB. If he was drafted in the 3rd round then that would be acceptable to me. But as a #1 draft pick in his forth, he is held to higher level of accountability.

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    Re: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    Love the write-up, Sam. However, I wanted to touch on this...

    Quote Originally Posted by RamsFanSam View Post
    Our defensive coordinator, Tim Walton, is not as well known as our OC. He is, however, known for being the secondary coach in Detroit. Somehow, I don't really recall any accolades he received for improving the Lion's defense.
    I know I'm going way back, but here's what Jeff Gordon said in February about the Rams' hiring of Walton...

    Quote Originally Posted by RamBill View Post
    • This is the Jeff Fisher Defense. This is his scheme. He does much of the game-planning and he is a strong game-day tactician. But he needs help with the play-calling and the fellow who filled that role last season, Blake Williams, fell out of sync with him. Now Williams is gone and Walton — a former college defensive coordinator at Memphis and Miami — will get a chance to develop a bigger coaching profile in St. Louis. (By the way, this is how the NFL should develop fresh coaching faces, offering opportunities to advance step by step.)
    I will say this about Walton: when the hire was made, there were a number of reports about how highly respected Walton was around the league. More recently, Gil Brandt was on SiriusXM NFL Radio the other night and was asked about Walton, and had nothing but the best things to say about him, even going so far as to say he's a guy who some feel has head coaching potential in this league.

    Maybe my memory is failing, but I seem to recall that when Bobby April came to the Rams, he arrived with the reputation fo being a great special teams coach. The Rams' special teams under him were not good, and he was eventually fired. He then went to Buffalo, where (again, if memory serves me) he helped the Bills become one of the best special teams in the league.

    I'm not trying to absolve Walton of blame - everyone deserves a share in this kind of debacle - but I agree with Gordon when he says this is Jeff Fisher's defense and he's already plenty involved. If you're looking for a coach to hold accountable for this unit's performance, Fisher needs to be included in the discussion.
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    Re: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    Quote Originally Posted by RamsFanSam View Post
    I know I am not happy with the 2013 Rams. But, they are still my team, and I will continue supporting them no matter what. I hope you are fan enough to do the same - win or lose.
    From our Nick's 'Upon Further Review: Rams Week 4' thread a day ago...

    "...Two complete no-shows against Dallas and San Francisco.

    Right now, it doesn't matter where Bradford throws, he simply isn't getting results." -- N. Wagoner

    Right now, upon further review, there's a lot of soul searching among Rams players and coaches, no doubt, and particularly, realigning of strategies and mentality. The potential is there but ... no results as the article reads.

    It is very difficult to cope with, and not drown, in this ocean of defeat and misery -- players and coaches and fans alike. Very hard to find consolation in future potential.

    Myself, I am far from dropping my support of the Rams. I criticize their shortcomings and failures but right now, I empathize with them too. As a fan, you won't see me wearing a brown paper bag on my head.

    I hope we've hit rock bottom and things will begin to improve, even amidst all this pain.

    -- Myself
    Oh, I sure hope we win vs. Jaguars! WIN DECIDEDLY!!!

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    Re: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    i wish thursday never happened
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    Re: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    It was a horrible letdown but to say there is no silver lining at all is a bit drastic,imo. Most of the players who will be key in getting this thing turned around are or soon will be available. I'm no Fishead but I think his weakness is acquisition, not leadership. The guy HAS been here before & pretty much "fixed it". as I'm sure many remember, The '09 Titans went 0-6 before finishing 8-2. CJ2K was really the only guy I'd covet on that team for a straight swap for their current Ram counterpart.

    Ogletree is another bright spot. Mistakes galore but he is a natural playmaker. Re-sign Dunbar & that LB corps will soon be grooving nicely.

    It will be a test, just as the London massacre was last year.Extra time to get pissed off & hungry for redemption & also get healthy is another bonus.

    And The jags really are as good an opponent to have coming up as any in the calendar. The Rams have been their own worst enemy but it hasn't helped that all 3 losses were vs serious playoff-inspired teams coming off a potentially disastrous early loss or two.

    As I've said before, I have no idea if the position coaches or coordinators are any good but I can see so much fundamentally poor football that it's really hard to say what's happening, big picture, even more because all those teams are pretty good & beating them would have been an upset. Sometimes I think we lose sight of that. I guess it's one thing to acknowledge the wild ride this season was likely to be, quite another to hit a sudden drop unexpectedly & nearly ralph the beer & chili dog you just snarfed.
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    Re: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    Quote Originally Posted by Azul e Oro View Post
    And The jags really are as good an opponent to have coming up as any in the calendar. The Rams have been their own worst enemy but it hasn't helped that all 3 losses were vs serious playoff-inspired teams coming off a potentially disastrous early loss or two.

    As I've said before, I have no idea if the position coaches or coordinators are any good but I can see so much fundamentally poor football that it's really hard to say what's happening, big picture, even more because all those teams are pretty good & beating them would have been an upset. Sometimes I think we lose sight of that.
    That pretty much sums up my current state of mind concerning the Rams. And yes, I am hoping we can somehow rebound and light up the Jags at home. I don't know their strengths and weaknesses, but I do know they haven't won a game - it is likely to stay that way through today, as they face a Colts team full of confidence stemming from a solid thrashing of the whiners on the road ..

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    Re: Sam's Silver Linings - Week Four (2013)

    Quote Originally Posted by RamsFanSam View Post
    Our defensive coordinator, Tim Walton, is not as well known as our OC. He is, however, known for being the secondary coach in Detroit. Somehow, I don't really recall any accolades he received for improving the Lion's defense.
    I remember reading up on Walton somwhere at the time he was hired, and he was highly regarded for Detroit's 3rd down efficiency rate on defense, a game plan Walton was responsible for on a weekly basis. I agree with you Sam that the coordinator needs to broadcast the strengths on this defense with his play calling and take an aggressive approach at the line.

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