Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Bosna-Ram's Avatar
    Bosna-Ram is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Age
    34
    Posts
    108
    Rep Power
    7

    The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    by: infemous

    Intrigued by the hiring of Josh McDaniels, I decided to do a spot of research. I posted on the Pats page and received some absolutely fantastic information. The idea was to find out information about McD as a Co-Ordinator. At Denver he could not be fairly judged due to his massive increase in responsibilities. It is difficult to see if he would work for us as well as he did for New England, mainly due to the hierarchal system in place there. Bill Belicheck is a more experienced, wisened and respected Head Coach than Steve Spagnuolo's. He runs that organisation in such a manner that his 'underlings' do not have the authority to affect the team in a way that contradicts his approach. A big question regards whether Spags wields that same power.
    In this post I'd like to summarise and present to you some of the information I gleamed from the Patriots fans. Again, many many thanks to the Patriots fans that commented on my post and shared such excellent information.


    System Information.
    Josh McDaniels gives his Wide Receivers options in their routes. This alludes to the comments made by many Bronco and Pats fans regarding the requirement of players in McD's system to be intelligent players. It means that Wide Receivers and Tight Ends have to have the intelligence to read the defense and adjust to what they are giving them in their routes. Quarterbacks also need to be very smart and on the same page as the WRs so that they can connect on these routes.
    The Running Back that will receive the most snaps will be the Running Back who is most effective in pass protection. Kevin Faulk saw 50% of the snaps in New England, due to his blocking ability (and his receiving ability).



    We'd have to see if SJax works hard at his blocking in the off season to fit the mould of a McDaniels Running back. Currently Kenneth Darby is our best blocking RB. For this reason alone I believe Darby will remain a Ram next season. This may also impact the likelihood of us drafting a complimentary back like Noel Devine or Quizz Rodgers in the upcoming draft. With Darby seeing an increase in snaps (hypothetically) this would lower the demand placed on SJax to run the ball and subsequently the need for a back up.

    McDaniels employs a man/power blocking Run Scheme. This means that our desire for more beef up front to aid the run game should hopefully be met. One of the first things he did in Denver was remove the zone blocking scheme and add some bigger linemen.

    McDaniels places emphasis on the 3rd WR as a safety net. So... If Clayton is #1 Amendola #2 in the slot and Gibson is #3, then Gibson should see a spike in production, mainly due to an increased role. Jabar Gaffney played this role for McDaniels. Generally this sort of player is a jack of all trades, solid mid level route runner. Whoever fits this role is open to debate.


    As I'm sure we all probably know, McD loves using his wideouts. TE's were not used too much by the Pats when he was there, but they did not have anyone who was particularly dynamic. They had Ben Watson, but no Gronk or Hernandez. This leads people to wonder what he'd have done with those 2 studs at TE. Do we compare? No, but it'll be interesting to see how McD utilizes the skills of Oh Oh and maybe even Fendi. Bajema would likely be kept, as from history McD has mainly used TEs as blockers. Remember he drafted blocking Tight End Quinn in the 2nd Round in his first draft with Denver.

    Playcalling.
    Patriots fans generally said that McDaniels neglected certain aspects of the offense. Specifically the RBs and TEs. It was stated that they were intrigued to see quite how Steven Jackson would be used.
    McDaniels apparently seems to get carried away with the pass, and will keep on passing even if there is a sizeable lead. This aggression is good, and a welcome relief to the extreme conservatism of Shurmer, however it will be important to not put undue pressure on our D through potential turnovers throwing the ball, or 3 and outs from a lack of success. This seems like a topic that will be heralded if we win, and chastised should we lose.
    A strong relationship between him and Spags should keep this aspect of his playcalling in check. Spags will need to be firm and strong as an HC, like Belicheck.
    With regards to playcalling and the game plan, it was stated that it would be key for Spags and McDaniels to create a strong relationship. McD would then devise a gameplan, propose it to Spags, and Spags will yay it or nay it. Spags would also use his defensive expertise to correct elements of the gameplan. The first half of the season should be centrally controlled (Spags as overseer) and if this works, McDaniels demonstrating to Spags that he is competent enough, will lead to more freedom to McD throughout the season.

    Personality.
    McDaniels' is often seen as too young to be respected. Hopefully he will be humbled by the Denver experience and come in as a more approachable and modest OC.
    A lot of McDaniels' success for us will revolve around how well he can gel with Spags. If they butt heads, McDaniels will be shown the door. This is something that I drew a lot of attention to in my previous post Josh McDaniels: Good or Bad? and is something entirely beyond our control or vision. We can theorise and have our own opinions, but that is all. We'll find out in the upcoming season, if we have one.


    Overall.
    The consensus is that McDaniels was an OK to good OC for New England. He did very well working within a successful structure with elite players. He did well bringing the best out of some players, but not everyone. Players like Lloyd, Gaffney, Cassell and Stallworth all had good seasons under his OC-ship, mainly due to him identifiying their strengths and playing to them. This shows a good eye for using of talent, which bodes well for us. We have a lot of very talented young guys, and hopefully McD will identify their skills and bring the best out of them.
    An example was provided of how McD played to strengths. This example was Cassell. Despite 6 RBs being injured that season, McD placed emphasis on the run game to remove the pressure from Cassell, the Pats then ran for 2200 yards. This is a good sign, as hopefully, should Bradford struggle, SJax and the run game will be able to relieve him. On a side note. Has anyone noticed the issue McD has had with injuries to RB corps throughout his career?
    Pats fans were uncertain whether McD's success was because of the players he had, or his coaching, but he has proven to be capable with the correct players, his success in STL being dependant on what our FO can do for him.
    Being an OC only, his role in the acquisition of players should be minimal. He will have a slight say on who or what he would like, but the final call rests with Spags and Devaney. This means McD's requirements will have to mould to the requirements of Spags and Billy, namely the 4 Pillars.

    My opinion.
    I feel that McDaniels is exactly what I thought he was, and I will maintain the hopeful stance that he is a success. The doubts regarding his character for me remain an issue, and my fears stem from a fear that Spags doesn't have the influence and power that Belicheck has. I hope he defines some ground rules and does not give McDaniels too much power early purely due to his contract size and reputation (having been a HC).


  2. #2
    Judaxi's Avatar
    Judaxi is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Maryland
    Age
    25
    Posts
    248
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    I like alot of the information that you dug up, but truthfully the only question I had after reading this was your knowledge of the Rams. Steven Jackson has been criticized for his pass blocking, but that was years ago. He has improved his blocking alot and was praised this year for his ability to help keep Sam on his feet in his rookie season and help out the O line with blitzing situations. I am excited to see what McHoodie does for this offense, and I plan on seeing SJ39 on the field alot, to run the ball, catch the ball, and also pass block.

  3. #3
    AvengerRam's Avatar
    AvengerRam is online now Moderator Emeritus
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Longwood, Florida, United States
    Age
    46
    Posts
    17,999
    Rep Power
    163

    Re: The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    The Patriots scored more points than any team in history in 2007 when McDaniels was in charge of the offense. Whatever criticism he's receiving now from Patriots fans can be filed under "sour grapes."

  4. #4
    Varg6's Avatar
    Varg6 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    3,593
    Rep Power
    42

    Re: The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    Say what you want about Randy Moss, but he obviously fit the bill as an intelligent WR. Is this something Gilyard can accomplish?


    Always and Forever a fan of the St. Louis Rams

  5. #5
    NJ Ramsfan1 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    new jersey
    Posts
    2,140
    Rep Power
    68

    Re: The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    My concern is not with McDaniels the coordinator, my concern is with McDaniels the person. He did not distinguish himself as a good communicator in Denver and then or course there was the taping incident. He had the benefit of working under the best head coach in football in Bill Belichick. In St. Louis, he will have to produce under a head coach who is still learning the ropes and with a less than stellar group of wideouts. Does he possess the personality and patience to acheive this?

    My perception of McDaniels- which could be totally wrong- is of a young guy who got too much too soon and got a bit too big for his britches (i.e. arrogant and aloof). Guys like this can undermine the guy in charge. I would hope McDaniels is given a clearly defined picture of his role and he understands it. There is a huge upside to having him as an OC, but disharmony is also a possibility if he oversteps his bounds.

  6. #6
    BoJangles's Avatar
    BoJangles is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    STL
    Posts
    12
    Rep Power
    0

    Re: The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    I think McD was a great hire. The guy's not a head coach but what he's done running offenses over the last few years is pretty remarkable. Can't wait to see what he can do with Sam

  7. #7
    shower beers's Avatar
    shower beers is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,998
    Rep Power
    58

    Re: The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    Quote Originally Posted by Varg6 View Post
    Say what you want about Randy Moss, but he obviously fit the bill as an intelligent WR. Is this something Gilyard can accomplish?
    Yikes. Right now, I would have to say no. He hasn't shown us anything that would suggest otherwise.

  8. #8
    OldSchoolRamFan's Avatar
    OldSchoolRamFan is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Castle Rock, Colorado, United States
    Age
    42
    Posts
    403
    Rep Power
    18

    Re: The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    Quote Originally Posted by Bosna-Ram View Post
    by: infemous

    McDaniels places emphasis on the 3rd WR as a safety net. So... If Clayton is #1 Amendola #2 in the slot and Gibson is #3, then Gibson should see a spike in production, mainly due to an increased role. Jabar Gaffney played this role for McDaniels. Generally this sort of player is a jack of all trades, solid mid level route runner. Whoever fits this role is open to debate.
    So, through this "research," Gibson is in and Avery is already "out"? I'm not quite ready to buy into that.
    Steve

    What you see is what you get, but what you see depends on where you stand.

  9. #9
    sosa39rams's Avatar
    sosa39rams is online now Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Hamilton, On
    Posts
    5,181
    Rep Power
    43

    Re: The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    Damn this gets me pumped for next year. I am ready to see this new Rams team. Playoffs here we come!!

  10. #10
    Flippin' Ram's Avatar
    Flippin' Ram is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Posts
    2,376
    Rep Power
    32

    Re: The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    The intelligence factor in proper route running concerns me when the name, "Gilyard" comes up. Hopefully he'll show significant improvement in the offseason and flourish to fulfill his draft expectations.

    EDIT: Anyways, great insight on getting to know McD a little more. Makes me wish September was here already!

  11. #11
    RealRam's Avatar
    RealRam is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Mexico
    Posts
    7,895
    Rep Power
    66

    Re: The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    From Fliptalian:

    The intelligence factor in proper route running concerns me when the name, "Gilyard" comes up. Hopefully he'll show significant improvement in the offseason and flourish to fulfill his draft expectations.

    Very interesting / promising research notes on our new OC! Nicely done, Bosna.

    V6 has come up with an equally important Q on the Moss @ NE / Gilyard @ STL comparison. As receivers they are two different specimens, of course, but as key components to contribute and produce results, these two players are perhaps in the same area of expectations. And only expectations. Not physical abilities, not dramatic or fantastic catches, and not attitude (thank goodness).

    The differences among these two WRs pose a real challenge. How in the world can one expect Gilyard to yield even close to that which Moss did in New Englad. Well, as both Billy Devaney and Coach Spags would say, "I give you Josh McDaniels". **JD stands up in meeting room -- applause by all present.**

    No, we won't see a Moss effect in the Rams offense (again, thank goodness), but Gilyard should be a true impact player this year and allow the passing game to improve a few notches.

    Last edited by RealRam; -02-22-2011 at 11:25 PM. Reason: Helmet

  12. #12
    cfh128's Avatar
    cfh128 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    Age
    31
    Posts
    769
    Rep Power
    29

    Re: The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    Quote Originally Posted by Bosna-Ram View Post
    by: infemous At Denver he could not be fairly judged due to his massive increase in responsibilities. It is difficult to see if he would work for us as well as he did for New England, mainly due to the hierarchal system in place there.
    I wonder if the author of this article actually talked to any Broncos fans or if he just assumed their opinion was irrelevant? We have had some visitors on this site who are Bronc fans that I feel have given us valuable insight into the kind of coach McDaniels will be for us

  13. #13
    HUbison's Avatar
    HUbison is offline Superbowl MVP
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Kentucky
    Age
    40
    Posts
    13,294
    Rep Power
    142

    Re: The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    We have a football offense liberal in charge: "We've got to protect the ball more; be more conservative instead of just airing it out all the time."

    We get a conservative play-caller: "We've got to air it out more; we're way too conservative."

    We get another liberal play-caller: "He's gonna air it out more; I love it!"

    Wonder what we will say in a season or two?
    "Before the gates of excellence the high gods have placed sweat; long is the road thereto and rough and steep at first; but when the heights are reached, then there is ease, though grievously hard in the winning." --- Hesiod

  14. #14
    AtlantaRamFan's Avatar
    AtlantaRamFan is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Georgia
    Age
    24
    Posts
    800
    Rep Power
    21

    Re: The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    Quote Originally Posted by HUbison View Post
    We have a football offense liberal in charge: "We've got to protect the ball more; be more conservative instead of just airing it out all the time."

    We get a conservative play-caller: "We've got to air it out more; we're way too conservative."

    We get another liberal play-caller: "He's gonna air it out more; I love it!"

    Wonder what we will say in a season or two?
    The grass is and will forever be greener on the other side. I'm at the point where I couldn't care less how they get it done. If they could find a way to run the Special Teams unit out there every play and up up 25-30 points a game you wouldn't hear a peep out of me.

    There are always going to be trade offs to either style of play. Ultimately what I'm happy about is we have an up and coming defense, and an offensive scheme (and players) that should score more points than before. Anything else is kinda nit picking IMO.
    Last edited by AtlantaRamFan; -02-23-2011 at 09:17 PM.

  15. #15
    Bosco is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    3
    Rep Power
    0

    Re: The Truth About Josh McDaniels

    Sorry to bump an old thread, but I came across this one and figured I could add my two cents to it since I've followed McDaniels career across my two favorite teams, the Broncos and Patriots.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bosna-Ram View Post
    by: infemous

    Intrigued by the hiring of Josh McDaniels, I decided to do a spot of research. I posted on the Pats page and received some absolutely fantastic information. The idea was to find out information about McD as a Co-Ordinator. At Denver he could not be fairly judged due to his massive increase in responsibilities. It is difficult to see if he would work for us as well as he did for New England, mainly due to the hierarchal system in place there. Bill Belicheck is a more experienced, wisened and respected Head Coach than Steve Spagnuolo's. He runs that organisation in such a manner that his 'underlings' do not have the authority to affect the team in a way that contradicts his approach. A big question regards whether Spags wields that same power.

    In this post I'd like to summarise and present to you some of the information I gleamed from the Patriots fans. Again, many many thanks to the Patriots fans that commented on my post and shared such excellent information.
    First off, thank you for being proactive and going looking for information on your new offensive coordinator. I'm sure your fellow Rams fans will appreciate you sharing your knowledge with them. The only thing I will add here is to be very, very careful about what you believe when getting the opinions of other fans, especially Broncos fans. 99% of the things you'll hear from them (he tried to trade Cutler, his personality sucks) is pure garbage propagated by the worthless Denver media.

    System Information.
    Josh McDaniels gives his Wide Receivers options in their routes. This alludes to the comments made by many Bronco and Pats fans regarding the requirement of players in McD's system to be intelligent players. It means that Wide Receivers and Tight Ends have to have the intelligence to read the defense and adjust to what they are giving them in their routes. Quarterbacks also need to be very smart and on the same page as the WRs so that they can connect on these routes.
    The Running Back that will receive the most snaps will be the Running Back who is most effective in pass protection. Kevin Faulk saw 50% of the snaps in New England, due to his blocking ability (and his receiving ability).
    This is all correct.

    Regarding McDaniel's system. A lot of people believe that he runs a spread offense, but that is only partly true. Josh really has no set offensive system and modifies it on the fly to fit his offensive personnel. This is evident in his work with New England as for every year he was the offensive coordinator the offenses looked very different.

    2005 - The Patriots are a balanced offense that was very much a hybrid of the Erhardt-Perkins and West Coast offenses. Many of the passes we run out of shotgun and/or 3 wide receiver sets, however deep passes were fairly limited. This offense is ranked 10th in points and 7th in yards.

    2006 - After losing most of their receiving talent, Josh engineers a more traditional Erhardt-Perkins, grind it out offense featuring tight end heavy formations. Ben Watson is the team's 2nd leading receiver with 49 catches. Offense improves to 7th in points scored.

    2007 - The Patriots reload their receiving corps with Randy Moss, Wes Welker, Donte Stallworth and the now healthy Jabar Gaffney but lose a security blanket in blocking tight end Daniel Graham. The result is a high flying shotgun based spread offense that sets several league records and leads the team to an undefeated regular season.

    2008 - Tom Brady is lost for the season in week one. College back up Matt Cassel takes over the reigns and Josh McDaniels designs a very West Coast esque offense to fit Cassel's strengths. The Patriots remain a top 10 offense.

    Obviously, McDaniels wants his offense to be built much like his 2007 offense, and that's exactly what he tried to build again in Denver. That offense was very much a flexible offense that could utilize many different philosophies. In 2007 it was not uncommon to see the Pats open up the game in a shotgun spread set and go no huddle, go to tight end heavy sets on their next possession and then move back to spread shotgun set on the following possession but without the no huddle.

    We'd have to see if SJax works hard at his blocking in the off season to fit the mould of a McDaniels Running back. Currently Kenneth Darby is our best blocking RB. For this reason alone I believe Darby will remain a Ram next season. This may also impact the likelihood of us drafting a complimentary back like Noel Devine or Quizz Rodgers in the upcoming draft. With Darby seeing an increase in snaps (hypothetically) this would lower the demand placed on SJax to run the ball and subsequently the need for a back up.

    McDaniels employs a man/power blocking Run Scheme. This means that our desire for more beef up front to aid the run game should hopefully be met. One of the first things he did in Denver was remove the zone blocking scheme and add some bigger linemen.
    If Jackson can in fact improve his blocking I think he will be a very good running back in this offense. Contrary to popular belief, Josh is not an ultra pass happy coach. His offenses HAVE been traditionally pass happy, but that is more the result of circumstance (namely injuries to his running backs) rather than his philosophy.

    McDaniels places emphasis on the 3rd WR as a safety net. So... If Clayton is #1 Amendola #2 in the slot and Gibson is #3, then Gibson should see a spike in production, mainly due to an increased role. Jabar Gaffney played this role for McDaniels. Generally this sort of player is a jack of all trades, solid mid level route runner. Whoever fits this role is open to debate.
    This is very true regarding the #3 receiver. This receiver is typically used as the #2 in most offenses but is relegated to the #3 in Josh's system. Speaking of receivers, Josh structures his hierarchy like this.

    #1 / X-receiver - This receiver is ideally going to be tall (6'3 or better) and fast (sub 4.5 40) and his main responsibility is going to be stretching the defense deep. Randy Moss played this role to perfection in 2007 and had a record setting season and Josh drafted a very similar type of player in 2010 when he took Demaryius Thomas, but he was injured for most of the year and Brandon Lloyd stepped up in this role. I believe Danario Alexander is tailor made for this position if he can stay healthy. Traditionally this is the "split end" but in speaking to McDaniel's versatility he plays this receiver on the LOS, off the LOS like a flanker and even in the slot.

    #2 / Z-receiver - In most offenses, this is where you play your more reliable receiver who can make catches in traffic. In McDaniel's offense, a prototypical slot receiver like Wes Welker or Eddie Royal takes this role. These guys are usually small and very quick. Most passes thrown to this receiver will be on slant, quick out and swing routes, with a good dose of bubble screens coming their way as well.

    #3 / Y-receiver - This is the guy who is going to be catching the short to intermediate routes, generally going over the middle. He should be average to above average size for a receiver, but speed is not really much of a concern. The most important attribute this receiver can have is solid route running and guts.

    As I'm sure we all probably know, McD loves using his wideouts. TE's were not used too much by the Pats when he was there, but they did not have anyone who was particularly dynamic. They had Ben Watson, but no Gronk or Hernandez. This leads people to wonder what he'd have done with those 2 studs at TE. Do we compare? No, but it'll be interesting to see how McD utilizes the skills of Oh Oh and maybe even Fendi. Bajema would likely be kept, as from history McD has mainly used TEs as blockers. Remember he drafted blocking Tight End Quinn in the 2nd Round in his first draft with Denver.
    Josh's reluctance to involve the tight ends in the passing game is very overstated. In 2006 Ben Watson was ranked about 5th or 7th (forget which exactly) in the league for passing targets per game at his position, but he has never stayed healthy his entire career and because of that he never really became the player he should have. In Denver, Josh made good use of Tony Scheffler until Tony decided to basically piss off the entire organization and get himself put in the doghouse. Daniel Graham and Richard Quinn were relegated to baby sitting for a weak and very young offensive line so they saw very few passes come their way.

    Is this an offense where you can expect your tight end to catch 50+ passes every year? No. To be sure, a receiving tight end is a luxury and not a requirement in this offense, but if the talent is there and healthy Josh WILL use it.

    Playcalling.
    Patriots fans generally said that McDaniels neglected certain aspects of the offense. Specifically the RBs and TEs. It was stated that they were intrigued to see quite how Steven Jackson would be used.

    McDaniels apparently seems to get carried away with the pass, and will keep on passing even if there is a sizeable lead. This aggression is good, and a welcome relief to the extreme conservatism of Shurmer, however it will be important to not put undue pressure on our D through potential turnovers throwing the ball, or 3 and outs from a lack of success. This seems like a topic that will be heralded if we win, and chastised should we lose.
    I touched on this above, but I really feel like this is unfair criticism coming from the Pats fans. I've already talked about the tight ends, but the running backs need to be addressed as well. McDaniels never really had any talent at running back during his tenure in New England. He had Corey Dillon in 2005 and 2006, but Dillon was well over the hill at that point. They drafted Laurence Maroney in the first round of 2006 but he was a disappointment and struggled with injuries including missing almost all of 2008. The rest of their guys were either situational guys like Kevin Faulk and Sammy Morris or back ups like LaMont Jordan and BenJarvus Green-Ellis. McDaniel's offenses have gone pass happy because they HAD to. Even the 2007 offense, known so well for their successful passing game only favored that slightly over the running game with a 55-45 split.

    A strong relationship between him and Spags should keep this aspect of his playcalling in check. Spags will need to be firm and strong as an HC, like Belicheck.
    With regards to playcalling and the game plan, it was stated that it would be key for Spags and McDaniels to create a strong relationship. McD would then devise a gameplan, propose it to Spags, and Spags will yay it or nay it. Spags would also use his defensive expertise to correct elements of the gameplan. The first half of the season should be centrally controlled (Spags as overseer) and if this works, McDaniels demonstrating to Spags that he is competent enough, will lead to more freedom to McD throughout the season.
    I don't think there is any reason to be concerned here. McDaniel's has had completely control of an offense under a defensive minded head coach before, so he will know what's expected of him.

    Personality.
    McDaniels' is often seen as too young to be respected. Hopefully he will be humbled by the Denver experience and come in as a more approachable and modest OC.
    A lot of McDaniels' success for us will revolve around how well he can gel with Spags. If they butt heads, McDaniels will be shown the door. This is something that I drew a lot of attention to in my previous post Josh McDaniels: Good or Bad? and is something entirely beyond our control or vision. We can theorise and have our own opinions, but that is all. We'll find out in the upcoming season, if we have one.
    I can assure you that McDaniels is not too young to be respected. Even as a 28 year play caller, Patriots players like Doug Flutie and Josh Miller raved about McDaniels command presence and ability to lead. Many of them were quite happy to follow Josh to Denver in 2009 and he was universally well liked in Denver, Jay Cutler not withstanding.

    Overall.Has anyone noticed the issue McD has had with injuries to RB corps throughout his career?
    I have, but I believe it's simply coincidence.

    Pats fans were uncertain whether McD's success was because of the players he had, or his coaching, but he has proven to be capable with the correct players, his success in STL being dependant on what our FO can do for him.
    Josh is an excellent coach and very capable teacher. Broncos RG Chris Kuper was quoted through his dad as saying that in the 18 months he played for McDaniels he learned more about the game of football than in his previous 20 some years. Tom Brady's rise from above average game manager to arguably the best quarterback in the game coincides directly with McDaniels becoming his positional coach in 2004. He took Matt Cassel and groomed him from a guy who hadn't started a game of football since high school and turned him into a highly coveted starting quarterback. He took an on again off again game manager in Kyle Orton and made him look like a legitimate All-Pro for the early part of 2010 even with the offensive line issues and non existent running game. All three of those men directly credit McDaniels with taking their career to new levels.

    Being an OC only, his role in the acquisition of players should be minimal. He will have a slight say on who or what he would like, but the final call rests with Spags and Devaney. This means McD's requirements will have to mould to the requirements of Spags and Billy, namely the 4 Pillars.
    You might be surprised. Bill Belichick gave McDaniels more power and say in personnel matters than he did with Weis, Crennel or Mangini. I see no reason to believe he will eventually have similar power in St. Louis.

    Well, that's about it for now. With McDaniels taking over your offense the Rams are now one of my teams to watch. Look forward to talking football with you more over the coming months.

Similar Threads

  1. Do we really want Josh Mcdaniels?
    By atank67 in forum Welcome to the ClanRam
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: -06-10-2011, 12:18 PM
  2. What will Josh McDaniels do for the Rams?
    By RamsFanSam in forum RAM TALK
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: -01-26-2011, 10:49 PM
  3. Josh McDaniels reportedly leaning towards Rams
    By Systemlangstaff in forum RAM TALK
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: -01-18-2011, 09:39 PM
  4. The obvious case for Josh McDaniels
    By 39thebeast in forum RAM TALK
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: -01-18-2011, 07:27 PM
  5. Rams sign Josh Mcdaniels!
    By FestusRam in forum RAM TALK
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: -01-18-2011, 07:26 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •