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Thread: Football 101

  1. #46
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    Re: Football 101

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBritishRam View Post
    I don't understand when commentators use the phrase "running the option", what does this mean???
    thoey is exactly right, that is the basic option. As well, a FB dive can be added to make it a triple option (1. FB dive, 2. QB offtackle, 3. RB sweep) You see it a lot in college. However, in the NFL, the defenses are just tooooo fast for the option to work consistently. But, with Vince Young now starting, the Titans may have to resort to running a little option until he gets comfortable with an NFL playbook.

    "Before the gates of excellence the high gods have placed sweat; long is the road thereto and rough and steep at first; but when the heights are reached, then there is ease, though grievously hard in the winning." --- Hesiod

  2. #47
    Milan Guest

    Re: Football 101

    How do kickers end up in the NFL? They never get drafted.

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    Re: Football 101

    Quote Originally Posted by Milan View Post
    How do kickers end up in the NFL? They never get drafted.
    Sure they do. Mike Nugent was drafted by the Jets two years ago. Kickers usually have long careers and so teams don't need to draft kickers as often as every other position.

    Remember we drafted Reggie Hodges (a punter) last year. :x
    Quote Originally Posted by ramsbruce
    Some of the excuses made for Jared Cook are laughable.

  4. #49
    Milan Guest

    Re: Football 101

    Quote Originally Posted by ramsbruce View Post
    Sure they do. Mike Nugent was drafted by the Jets two years ago. Kickers usually have long careers and so teams don't need to draft kickers as often as every other position.

    Remember we drafted Reggie Hodges (a punter) last year. :x

    All of them got drafted?

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    Re: Football 101

    Quote Originally Posted by Milan View Post
    All of them got drafted?
    All of who?

    Like I said kickers ususally have long careers, so you don't see too many (if any sometimes) drafted each year because teams aren't in need. Look how long we have had Jeff Wilkins, we don't need a kicker (yet) so like most teams why draft one when you don't need one. Two years ago the Jets needed a kicker and drafted Mike Nugent, he's from Ohio State I believe.

    Are you thinking of playing kicker?
    Quote Originally Posted by ramsbruce
    Some of the excuses made for Jared Cook are laughable.

  6. #51
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    Re: Football 101

    Quote Originally Posted by Milan View Post
    How do kickers end up in the NFL? They never get drafted.
    They get to the NFL just like every other player......they're either drafted or sign free agent contracts. There are several NFL kickers just this decade who find themselves on team rosters via the draft.....Mike Nugent, Dave Rayner, Josh Scobee, Nate Kaeding, Josh Brown, Paul Edinger, Neil Rackers, Sebastian Janikowski. But most others were simply picked up after the draft as free agents.
    "Before the gates of excellence the high gods have placed sweat; long is the road thereto and rough and steep at first; but when the heights are reached, then there is ease, though grievously hard in the winning." --- Hesiod

  7. #52
    Milan Guest

    Re: Football 101

    Quote Originally Posted by ramsbruce View Post
    All of who?


    Are you thinking of playing kicker?

    Nope.

    Alright now I understand, thanks for the help.

  8. #53
    Sweets Guest

    Re: Football 101

    Less expensive to wait and pick up a kicker after the draft.

  9. #54
    methodical_reaction Guest

    Re: Football 101

    In terms of Blitzing, what is the difference in a run blitz and just blitzing in general? Don't LB's that are blitzing look for the run anyway, why the distinction? And when is it better to run blitz?
    Last edited by methodical_reaction; -11-08-2006 at 12:04 PM.

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    Re: Football 101

    Questions about pass rushing for an expert.

    On defense, you can have 3 or 4 lineman and 3 or 4 linebackers. So the number of players is 7 that could pass rush. Any DB that pass rushes would only do so during a blitz.

    How many of the 7 players can pass rush without it being called a blitz? Is it just the guys on the line?

    Are the seven players given instructions on when to rush and when to stay on run defense, or are they given free rein to read the offense and react accordingly?

    Can you tell me if there is a relationship between teams that have a good pass rush and teams that are good at stopping the run? Is the success of the defense often based upon their ability to recognize a run or pass play and adjust accordingly?

    How can you pass rush and mind your gap?

    Be gentle with me, this is suppose to be football 101
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    Re: Football 101

    Interesting FTG. Your notes are from an offensive perspective regarding blocking of linebackers by perhaps a TE or RB. They seem to about protecting the QB during a blitz.

    <LI class=tip>Watching the first two steps that the linebacker takes should be enough. If he takes two steps forward at the snap, figure he's coming and stay in to block him. If he takes two steps backward at the snap, figure he's dropping into coverage and take off on your route.
    It does seem that the defense is set before the play to determine if they are dropping into coverage or rushing.

    Have you ever played defense FTG?

    Thanks for posting this. I have only played a little flag football and I think the only decisions we made on defense was who was going in for a blitz and the rest of us were just playing man on man. There are so many things about football that I don't understand and I probably sound like an idiot half the time and I don't even know it.

    Hopefully our expert is still around and he can give us some explanations from the defensive perspective regarding pass rushing.
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  12. #57
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    Re: Football 101

    Quote Originally Posted by Utter
    How many of the 7 players can pass rush without it being called a blitz? Is it just the guys on the line?
    Technically, any player rushing the passer without a hand on the ground (ie. on the line) is a blitzer, be they LB or DB.
    Quote Originally Posted by Utter
    Are the seven players given instructions on when to rush and when to stay on run defense, or are they given free rein to read the offense and react accordingly?
    Strategies vary, but for the most part, the defense has little room to ad lib. Yes, they can pre-snap and even post-snap read and react to some degree (actually, the Tampa-2 D is built on this notion), but typically, each defender has specific gap and/or man assignments on each snap.
    Can you tell me if there is a relationship between teams that have a good pass rush and teams that are good at stopping the run? Is the success of the defense often based upon their ability to recognize a run or pass play and adjust accordingly?
    Well, that depends on the talents of the defenders and the scheme involved. Even the basic formation makes a difference.....a 4-3 is typically for pass rushing while the 3-4, in theory, is superior in run stopping. However, talent on the field and the coaching booth trumps everything. For example, last season the top 2 pass rushing teams and 3 of the top 5 were 3-4 teams. In theory, it shouldn't be that way, but teams like San Diego and Baltimore just have so much talent in their front 7 they can maintain a 3-4 alignment to stop the run and set the world on fire with their pass rush. However, 5 of the top pass rush teams are not in the top 10 for run stopping.
    "Before the gates of excellence the high gods have placed sweat; long is the road thereto and rough and steep at first; but when the heights are reached, then there is ease, though grievously hard in the winning." --- Hesiod

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    Re: Football 101

    Thanks for the answers HUbison. Here are some follow up questions. Sorry for being so darn ignorant, but I can't change without asking question.

    Would it be fair to say then, that any pass rush, will involve a blitz? Or can you call it a pass rush if only the lineman rush the QB?

    What are the statistics used to rank pass rushing for a team? Is it based on the number of completed passes for a game, or season? Where do the Rams rank in pass rushing for last year?
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    Re: Football 101

    Quote Originally Posted by Utterblitz
    How can you pass rush and mind your gap?
    I'd just like to add that a player maintains his gap assignment on a blitz by running through that gap. This is what a one-gap tackle usually does. Anyone trying to go through that gap is going to run right into you if you do your job right.
    Quote Originally Posted by Utterblitz
    Would it be fair to say then, that any pass rush, will involve a blitz? Or can you call it a pass rush if only the lineman rush the QB?
    You can call it a pass rush with just the linemen because on a passing play that's exactly what they're going to be doing. Some teams do quite well with just a four man rush (just the defensive linemen).
    Quote Originally Posted by Utterblitz
    What are the statistics used to rank pass rushing for a team? Is it based on the number of completed passes for a game, or season? Where do the Rams rank in pass rushing for last year?
    The most obvious one would be number of sacks. Some people also keep track of "QB hurries", but that's not a statistic the NFL keeps record of.
    Quote Originally Posted by Utterblitz
    Is the success of the defense often based upon their ability to recognize a run or pass play and adjust accordingly?
    This is most important for the linebackers. Often a defensive lineman's job will be the same regardless of what else is happening on the field because he doesn't have a good enough view to read it. The corners are going to do the same thing until there is no chance of the quarterback throwing their way. However, the linebackers are the ones who are going to have to flow to the ball to make the tackle. If they make the wrong read, they're going to get caught out of position.

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    Re: Football 101

    Would it be fair to say then, that any pass rush, will involve a blitz? Or can you call it a pass rush if only the lineman rush the QB?
    A pass rush is simply that.......defenders rushing the pass. In its basic form, you judge a team's pass rush (be it either blitzing or in base package) by number of sacks. However, there's something to be said for a front 7's ability to disrupt the pass without sacking the QB....ie. # of interceptions, QB comp. %, etc.

    So, a blitz is always part of the pass rush, but the pass rush does not always involve a blitz.
    "Before the gates of excellence the high gods have placed sweat; long is the road thereto and rough and steep at first; but when the heights are reached, then there is ease, though grievously hard in the winning." --- Hesiod

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