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Thread: The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

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    The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

    Please keep all Senior Bowl related information contained in this thread, thanks!


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    Re: The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

    2014 Senior Bowl preview
    By Dan Kadar @MockingTheDraft
    Jan 20 2014, 9:30a +
    Marvin Gentry-USA TODAY Sports

    Despite several top seniors dropping out of college football's premier all-star game, there are plenty of players to follow this week.

    The Senior Bowl is college football's premiere all-star game for a reason. Held annually at Ladd Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Ala., it has produced 13 No. 1 picks including Eric Fisher 2013's top pick.

    Before a week's worth of practices, Fisher wasn't viewed as a possible No. 1 pick. But he left Mobile as the top choice for the Kansas City Chiefs. Although the Senior Bowl isn't expected to churn out the No. 1 pick in the 2014 NFL Draft, the North and South rosters are loaded with talent.

    Top players:

    Derek Carr, QB, Fresno State
    Does Derek Carr's NFL Draft position depend on how he plays in Mobile? Yes. Is that fair? No. After a good senior season, Carr faltered in Fresno State's bowl game against Southern California. His momentum ceased. The issue for Carr is his footwork, particularly in the face of pressure. In a practice setting, he should excel and that should be the expectation. If he doesn't look like a star this week, he could plummet.

    Ra'Shede Hageman, DT, Minnesota
    As a defensive tackle, Hageman is an uncanny athlete. He can explode off the snap and work his way between blockers to disrupt the quarterback. The issue for Hageman is that he doesn't always doe it on a consistent basis. When he's on, Hageman is unquestionably a first-round pick.

    Jordan Matthews, WR, Vanderbilt
    Despite the quarterback play at Vanderbilt, Matthews pulled in 112 receptions for 1,477 yards and seven touchdowns as a senior. He's a savvy route runner who knows how to extend his hands and pull the ball in away from his frame. He closed his final season at Vandy with four consecutive games of more than 125 yards receiving and has the look of a first-round pick.

    Jimmie Ward, S, Northern Illinois
    In the 2013 Orange Bowl, Ward was one of the few Northern Illinois players who could hang with Florida State. In that game he had 14 tackles, a career high. As a senior, Ward had 77 tackles, 50 of which were solo tackles. He also pulled in six interceptions. Other than some height concerns, he's a complete safety.

    Charles Sims, RB, West Virginia
    Even if Ohio State's Carlos Hyde's had stayed in the Senior Bowl, Sims could make a strong case for being the best running back in practices this week. He's a superb receiver out of the backfield and runs with good vision and determination.

    Deone Bucannon, S, Washington State
    An all-star setting may not show off Bucannon's best asset: bone-jarring hits. Bucannon is an enforcer in the middle of the field who can make big plays on the ball. Bucannon led WSU with 114 tackles this season and added six interceptions.

    Christian Jones, OLB, Florida State
    Jones was all over the place during his college career, lining up in the middle, outside and at defensive end. In 2013, he was at his best at end. To stay there in the pros, he'll need to bulk up. If not he has a future as an outside linebacker where he can take advantage of his play against the run.

    Trent Murphy, DE/OLB, Stanford
    Like Jones, Murphy is somewhat a man without a position. The Senior Bowl has him listed as a defensive end after he mostly played as an outside linebacker in Stanford's powerful 3-4 defense. Murphy needs to show he ha the athleticism to beat blockers when his power move doesn't work.

    Jeremiah Attaochu, OLB, Georgia Tech
    Teams looking for a good Leo prospect (looking at you, Jacksonville) will like what Attaochu offers. He can line up wide and has the speed to close on the quarterback in a hurry. That was evidenced in Attaochu's 12.5 sacks in 2013 to go along with 16 tackles for loss.

    Kyle Van Noy, OLB, BYU
    Van Noy often gets overlooked when people talk about Attaochu, Jones, Murphy and Buffalo's Khalil Mack. He's a do-everything linebacker who excelled in BYU's 3-4 defense. He's solid in coverage, does well on special teams and can play the run nicely.

    Telvin Smith, OLB, Florida State
    There are some size concerns with Smith, but teams looking for an athletic weak-side linebacker will one Smith. He can make plays all over the field and can get into the backfield in a hurry.


    Measurables that matter:

    The most disturbing part of the Senior Bowl is the weigh-in process on Mondays. Players step in front of a group of scouts and media and get measured in little more than their underwear. While creepy, the two most important things to keep in mind from measurements are arm length and hand size. Arm length is particularly important for cornerbacks and offensive and defensive linemen. Hand size is important for offensive skill position players. The bigger the hand size, the less likely a player is to fumble the ball.

    Here are a few players where their measurements are important:

    Zack Martin, OT, Notre Dame
    Some teams will view Martin as an offensive tackle. Others will look at him as a guard. His arm length could go a long way in determining his position in the NFL. Many consider Martin a good tackle but a great guard, but he plays well enough outside to stick at tackle.

    Aaron Donald, DT, Pittsburgh
    Donald is a sensational gap shooter who's interior rush moves often require multiple blockers. As fickle as it may sound, though, if Donald measures in at shorter than 6-foot or has short arms, he could slide down the draft.


    Something to prove:

    The following players have vast potential, but didn't always realize it during their college careers.

    Logan Thomas, QB, Virginia Tech
    At one point in his career, Thomas had the look of a top 10 player. It's impossible not to be optimistic about a freshman or sophomore quarterback with Ben Roethlisberger's size and athleticism who also possesses a stronger arm. The catch turned out to be that Thomas peaked early in his career. There wasn't the type of improvement many wanted and expected to see. It should be noted that it's not totally the fault of Thomas, a converted tight end. His receiving group at Tech hasn't produced much NFL talent, and they were prone to dropping passes. Some team is going to take a chance on Thomas and hope he can be molded into the player we all expected him to be.

    Seantrel Henderson, OT, Miami
    Coming out of high school, Henderson already had an NFL body and looked like a future top 10 pick. But injuries, off-field issues and generally average play kept him off the field. When Henderson did get on the field in 2013, it was often at right tackle. That's most likely his position in the NFL because of his footwork.

    Daniel McCullers, DT, Tennessee
    Noticing a trend with these players? Big players with big, untapped potential. At 6-foot-8 and 351 pounds, McCullers is the biggest player at the Senior Bowl this year. The problem is, he doesn't always play like it. If he can dominate opposing offensive linemen in practices this week, his draft stock should rise.

    Adrian Hubbard, OLB, Alabama
    The expectation for Hubbard was that he'd become a superstar pass rusher for Nick Saban. But Hubbard was nowhere to be found in several games, and had just three sacks on the season.

    Tajh Boyd, QB, Clemson
    OK, Boyd doesn't fit size portion of this segment. Even though Boyd threw for nearly 4,000 yards as a senior, he didn't progress season-to-season as expected. Virtually no one is talking about Boyd. He could change that this week.

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    Re: The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

    2014 Senior Bowl: Position-by-position preview
    By Dane Brugler | NFLDraftScout.com Senior Analyst
    January 19, 2014 1:35 am ET

    Before the football spotlight shines on New York/New Jersey for the Super Bowl in two weeks, Mobile, Alabama will turn into NFL headquarters this week as hundreds of coaches, scouts and personnel men congregate for the 2014 Reese's Senior Bowl.

    Evaluators have volumes of game tape on file of all the top prospects, but scouting players in an all-star setting brings a different perspective on an even playing field. For “small school” prospects, it allows scouts to see them on the same field as players from Alabama and Ohio State. For players who had a down senior season, the Senior Bowl gives prospects a chance to redeem themselves. Simply put, players have a lot to gain from a positive week of practice at Ladd-Peebles Stadium. Last year, Eric Fisher, Lane Johnson and Ziggy Ansah dominated the competition in Mobile, which helped turn them from possible first rounders into top-five overall picks.

    While the 2014 Senior Bowl lacks some star power with over 30 seniors pulling out due to injuries or personal reasons, the rosters are still loaded with future NFL talent. Below is position-by-position preview of the top players to watch:

    QUARTERBACK:

    Top player: Derek Carr, Fresno State
    A possible first round pick, Carr has elite velocity as a passer and can make every throw on the football field. He needs to improve his pocket tolerance and mechanics, but Carr has the mobility, arm strength and football instincts that makes him an appealing prospect. He should shine in Mobile.

    Arrow pointing up: Jimmy Garoppolo, Eastern Illinois
    After a record-breaking career at the FCS-level, Garoppolo impressed NFL teams last week at the East-West Shrine Game and will look to do the same this week in Mobile. He doesn't have a cannon for an arm, but his eye use, quick release and intellectual process is top shelf.

    Arrow pointing down: Stephen Morris, Miami
    Morris has effortless arm strength to deliver the ball anywhere on the field, but his decision making and accuracy are both questionable, causing him to struggle much of 2013. He has enough size and athleticism, but his consistency as a passer leaves a lot to be desired.

    RUNNING BACK:

    Top player: Charles Sims, West Virginia
    With Carlos Hyde dropping out, Sims steps up as the top running back prospect in Mobile this week. He is a tough, one-cut runner who stays upright through contact with his combination of natural balance and power. The Houston transfer is also very reliable catching the ball out of the backfield.

    Arrow pointing up: James White, Wisconsin
    After waiting his turn behind Montee Ball, White shouldered a heavier load in 2013, despite sharing carries with the more talented Melvin Gordon. He has a lean frame and will probably never get above 200 pounds, but he runs tough, physical and has exceeded expectations.

    Arrow pointing down: David Fluellen, Toledo
    Fluellen eclipsed the 1,000 yard rushing mark in 2013, but he also battled several injuries that kept him on the sidelines part of the season. An above average pass-catcher, the MAC runner is tough and reliable with the ball in his hands, but he also lacks the athletic traits to separate him from others.

    WIDE RECEIVER:

    Top player: Jordan Matthews, Vanderbilt
    A very productive target, Matthews is an impressive prospect because of his athleticism, catching radius and determination with the ball in his hands. With a combined 201 receptions the past two seasons, he is a detailed and reliable route runner who takes pride in his finishing ability.

    Arrow pointing up: Jared Abbrederis, Wisconsin
    A former walk-on, Abbrederis is a balanced athlete with gliding speed and short-area quickness to create separation in coverage. Although he's not the biggest or fastest, he is a savvy route runner and reliable hands-catcher who projects as a dependable NFL target.

    Arrow pointing down: Cody Hoffman, BYU
    After recording 100 catches last year, Hoffman's production dropped in 2013 (57/894/5) as he battled injuries and inconsistencies. He has a tall, lean frame and will be too easily out-muscled by defensive backs and knocked off his route. Hoffman needs a strong week in Mobile.

    TIGHT END/FULLBACK:

    Top player: C.J. Fiedorowicz, Iowa
    A well-built target, Fiedorowicz headlines an underwhelming group of senior tight ends. His production at Iowa is average at-best, but he was underutilized in the Hawkeyes offense. Fiedorowicz has the size and skill-set to start at the next level and be successful blocking and receiving.

    Arrow pointing up: Jay Prosch, Auburn
    Although he didn't receive a lot of touches in Auburn's productive offense, Prosch was still a vital part of what the Tigers did in the run game. Prosch, who didn't have a single carry in 2013 (and only five catches), is a smash-mouth blocker and plays with a finishing attitude.

    Arrow pointing down: Marcel Jensen, Fresno State
    Despite Fresno State's pass-happy offense led by Derek Carr, Jensen wasn't a substantial part of the Bulldogs' offense. He wasn't asked to be a consistent blocker and has an average skill-set as a receiver, similar to former South Carolina tight end Justice Cunningham.

    OFFENSIVE LINE:

    Top player: Zack Martin, Notre Dame
    Arguably the top overall prospect in Mobile this week, Martin started four seasons for the Irish at left tackle and showed steady improvement each season. There is some debate as to whether he should stay at tackle or move to guard, but regardless, he projects as a 10-year NFL starter.

    Arrow pointing up: Billy Turner, North Dakota State
    The cornerstone of an offensive line that helped NDSU win three straight FCS titles, Turner is a mobile and tough blocker with controlled movements to be effective at the line of scrimmage and at the second level. He is another candidate to possibly move inside to guard.

    Arrow pointing down: Seantrel Henderson, Miami
    Since his high school recruitment, Henderson has attracted controversy and struggled to stay on the field with several issues with the coaches and off the field. He has an ideal build with the balance and foot athleticism to shield the pocket, but his reliability as a pro is a strong question mark.

    DEFENSIVE LINE:

    Top player: Aaron Donald, Pittsburgh
    Despite lacking ideal size and frame for an interior rusher, Donald is an active, energetic player who uses first step quickness and natural leverage to power into the backfield. He won't be a fit for everyone, but Donald has a relentless motor to fight through the whistle and is a pesky guy to block.

    Arrow pointing up: Dee Ford, Auburn
    The Tigers top pass rusher this season, Ford tallied 10.5 sacks as an edge rusher with his natural athleticism and quick acceleration off the snap. He shows natural bend and flexibility and has some hybrid qualities so he will be evaluated differently by 4-3 and 3-4 teams.

    Arrow pointing down: Will Sutton, Arizona State
    After an outstanding junior campaign, Sutton had an up-and-down senior season, flashing the same penetrating quickness, but just not consistently. He will need a big week in Mobile to prove to scouts that they're drafting the 2012 version of Sutton, not the tight, streaky player from this past year.

    LINEBACKER:

    Top player: Telvin Smith, Florida State
    Despite being a tick undersized, Smith has the range and speed to cover both sidelines. He will get tied up and lost in a crowd, but when he has the chance to play in space or rush the pocket, few linebackers in this class display his sudden explosive qualities.

    Arrow pointing up: Kyle Van Noy, BYU
    A jack-of-all-trades linebacker, Van Noy is a smart, versatile linebacker who scratches and crawls his way to the pocket. He has tweener traits and needs to get stronger to better match-up with NFL blockers, but his twitchy athleticism and ability to drop in coverage will be appealing to 3-4 defenses.

    Arrow pointing down: Adrian Hubbard, Alabama
    A rare fourth-year junior participating in Mobile, Hubbard decided to skip his senior year despite an inconsistent 2013 season in Tuscaloosa. He finished his junior year with 33 tackles and three sacks as the Tide's SAM linebacker and has several questions to answer regarding his range and reaction quickness.

    DEFENSIVE BACK

    Top player: Jimmie Ward, Northern Illinois
    Coming off a 95-tackle, seven interception senior season, Ward has been quietly ascending up draft boards since the Fall. He is smart, heady and puts himself in position to succeed, using his speed and range to cover the deep half of the field. Look for the safety to have a big week in Mobile.

    Arrow pointing up: Jaylen Watkins, Florida
    Although he was often overshadowed the past few seasons by the Gators deep, talented secondary, Watkins is a quick-footed and fluid athlete himself. He lacks ideal muscle, but Watkins, who is the older brother of Clemson receiver Sammy Watkins, is a tough, scrappy tackler.

    Arrow pointing down: Stanley Jean-Baptiste, Nebraska
    Jean-Baptiste is attempting to follow the Richard Sherman path to the NFL as a big, long ex-receiver, transitioning to the secondary. However, the Nebraska corner still plays like a former receiver and hasn't shown the progression expected. Maybe NFL coaching will be the help Jean-Baptiste needs…

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    Re: The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

    Brandt: 5 under-the-radar prospects at the Senior Bowl
    By Gil Brandt
    NFL Media senior analyst
    Published: Jan. 20, 2014 at 01:23 p.m.

    I came out with my top 50 NFL prospects last week and a good number of them come from the 98 underclassmen who left school early to enter the 2014 draft.

    There are some very good senior prospects on the list as well, many who are participating at this week's Reese's Senior Bowl practices in Mobile, Ala., like Fresno State QB Derek Carr and Oklahoma CB Aaron Colvin.

    Here are five very good players that didn't make my top 50 but are worth keeping an eye on this week at the Senior Bowl, and who could help their draft stock with good showings:

    Stanley Jean-Baptiste, DB, Nebraska
    Jean-Baptiste has rare size (6-foot-2 3/8, 215); he looks like a clone of Richard Sherman. I'm sure the Seahawks, among most NFL teams, will be paying close attention to this player. He's a junior-college transfer who only played cornerback for a season and a half at Nebraska after switching from wide receiver in 2011. Has very long arms (78 3/8 wingspan) and is a willing tackler. Looks fast in coverage and has quickness. If he looks like he can cover in man drills this week, he might move up into my top 100. Smart player who entered 2013 with his degree already in hand.

    Ja'Wuan James, OT, Tennessee
    Most of the attention on the Vols' offensive line went to massive LT Antonio Richardson, but Tennessee has another good NFL prospect on the other side of the line. At 6-6 1/8 and 315 pounds, James will be hard to miss at the Senior Bowl. He holds the school record for most starts by an offensive lineman (49, all at right tackle), including 13 games as a true freshman. He reminds me of Titans RT David Stewart when Stewart came out of Mississippi State in 2005; has similar traits. He's strong but doesn't have great feet (would have difficult time at LT). He's mean and tough. Did good job on Jadeveon Clowney when the South Carolina defensive end lined up on James' side. Good run-blocker. Could find his way into the third round with a good showing this week.

    Charles Sims, RB, West Virginia
    Sims will be the best running back at the Senior Bowl. He's well-built at 5-11 7/8 and 214 pounds, and has run the 40 in 4.46 seconds. He can run and catch as well as any back in the draft. After four years at Houston, he transferred to West Virginia in 2013, but WVU's offensive line didn't allow him to showcase his skills much, so he enters the draft process as a bit of a sleeper. I still can't figure out why he came back for a fifth year. He reminds me some of the Bengals' Giovani Bernard. He's most likely a third-day choice at this point, but a good Senior Bowl will turn heads; problem is, it's difficult for running backs to show skills and have good statistics in all-star games.

    Kareem Martin, DE, North Carolina
    Some believe Martin (6-5 7/8, 272) should have entered the 2013 draft after receiving a grade from the draft advisory board that indicated he could be taken in the first two rounds. I think he made a good choice; a good week at the Senior Bowl could move him to the top of the second. He finished his senior season with big production (11.5 sacks and his 21.5 tackles for loss were the fifth-most in NCAA in 2013). Has very good pass-rush skills and possesses the traits (4.85 40 and very athletic) NFL teams look for in a 4-3 defensive end. As a four-year starter in a top program, Martin has more experience than most at his position in this draft. He needs to get stronger. Good character. Massive wingspan (84 1/4).

    Kyle Van Noy, LB, BYU
    BYU coaches I've talked to rave about this player. He's an outside linebacker with pass-rush and coverage skills. He's an outstanding blitzer off the edge. He finished his junior season with 13 sacks (Ziggy Ansah helped free him up) and 2013 with 17.5 tackles for loss. Moves well. Solid player who should go late in second round, but could move up with a good week at the Senior Bowl. Measured 6-foot-3 1/4 and 244 pounds at Senior Bowl.

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    Re: The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

    2014 NFL Draft: Senior Bowl weigh-in winners and losers
    By Rob Rang | The Sports Xchange/CBSSports.com
    January 20, 2014 12:47 pm ET

    The most critical component of the Senior Bowl (and all other postseason all-star games) from a scouting perspective is how a player performs in practice but the first impressions made during the weigh-ins is also important.

    A year ago, Alabama's D.J. Fluker created buzz by sporting an NFL-ready frame. Despite his not being able to perform during the practices, he was viewed as a Senior Bowl winner just because of his incredible weight distribution and long arms.

    On the other end of the spectrum were players who measured in shorter than expected, including quarterbacks Ryan Nassib and Tyler Wilson. Their less-than-ideal height contributed to each "slipping" to the fourth round.

    Along with hundreds of NFL personnel, NFLDraftScout.com was on hand for Monday morning's weigh-ins. Below are five prospects whose impressive physiques created an early positive buzz among scouts. Following that is a list of five players who had better hope their play through the week of practice helps scouts forget about less-than-ideal measurements.

    Players are listed alphabetically within each group.

    Winners

    Deone Bucannon, S, Washington State: At a shade under 6-feet-1 and 216 pounds, Bucannon certainly passed the eyeball test, sporting a muscled-up frame that stood out in comparison to the other safeties in this game. With a 78-inch wingspan, Bucannon also had the widest of any of the safeties measured.

    Kadeem Edwards, OL, Tennessee State: Scouts love linemen with long arms and Edwards has the longest of any of the athletes measured Monday at the Senior Bowl, measuring in at 34½ inches. The 6-4 1/8, Edwards also showed good weight distribution with a relatively trim middle at 308 pounds.

    Ra'Shede Hagemen, DT, Minnesota: Another highly regarded lineman who showed impressive weight distribution, measuring in at exactly 6-6 and 318 pounds. His arms (33¾ inches) were also among the longest of any of the defensive tackles measured Monday.

    Jordan Matthews, WR, Vanderbilt: Considering his success in the SEC, perhaps it isn't surprising that Matthews looked the part of a future high NFL pick. Some of the conference's biggest names weren't nearly as well-built as the Commodores' star receiver, who sported a chiseled 6-2 (and 5/8-inch), 209-pound frame, long arms (32 5/8 inches) and big hands (10½ inches).

    Caraun Reid, DT, Princeton: One could quickly tell that Reid spent more than his share of time in the weight room rather than just in the library as the Ivy Leaguer showed off a surprisingly well-built frame at 6-2 (and 1/8 inch) and 301 pounds. While perhaps a bit shorter than scouts would like, Reid's impressive frame and adequate arm length (32 5/8 inches) helped the small-schooler stand out amongst FBS stars.

    Losers

    Chris Borland, ILB, Wisconsin: Borland has been compared to former Miami Dolphins stud linebacker Zach Thomas for much of his career and his instincts and open-field tackling ability warrant the mention. He looked smaller on stage than his official height (5-11 3/8 inches) and weight (245), however, and tied with former teammate, running back James White, with the shortest arms of any player measured Monday (28 5/8 inches).

    Adrian Hubbard, OLB/DE, Alabama: Scouts will be intrigued with Hubbard's length at nearly 6-6 but there was surprisingly little muscular development on his 255-pound frame. For a player coming off a disappointing junior season and yet elected to enter the NFL Draft with a year of collegiate eligibility remaining, it wasn't the best impression to make.

    Jalen Saunders, WR, Oklahoma: It is a big man's game and to the surprise of no one, Saunders came in the smallest of any player at this year's Senior Bowl. Saunders came in just under 5-9 (officially 5-8¾) and 164 pounds. He also has small hands (8¾ inches) and short arms (28 7/8 inches).

    Telvin Smith, ILB, Florida State: Smith's speed is certain to get him drafted but teams may have to move him outside or perhaps drop him back to safety with a frame that looks packed out at 218 pounds.

    Will Sutton, DT, Arizona State: Though he was listed at 265 pounds for much of his career with the Sun Devils, scouts knew that Sutton was in fact much bigger. He gained more weight for his senior season and wasn't as effective in 2013, despite the fact that he was rewarded with the Pac-12 Defensive Player of the Year award. Some of that extra weight was clearly around his middle as Sutton weighed in at 315 pounds at just under 6-1. Worse, his 30 5/8-inch arms were the shortest of any of the defensive tackles measured Monday.

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    Re: The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

    2014 Senior Bowl: 10 observations from Monday's North practice
    By Dane Brugler | NFLDraftScout.com Senior Analyst
    January 20, 2014 7:36 pm ET

    More Draft: NFL Mock Drafts | Prospect Rankings | Latest news | Senior Bowl

    MOBILE, Ala. – The North squad suited up at Ladd-Peebles Stadium on Monday afternoon and practiced as the wind picked up and sun started to set, disappearing behind the stadium's elevated press box.

    The Falcons coaching staff, led by head coach Mike Smith, led a well-organized practice with hundreds of scouts, coaches and evaluators looking on from the stands. Atlanta's general manager Thomas Dimitroff had a front row seat, viewing the practice on the field next to his coaching staff. The important takeaway from Monday is to isolate where certain prospects struggled in order to see if they show improvement on Tuesday, Wednesday and the rest of the week. A prospect's ability to respond to NFL coaching is a substantial part of Senior Bowl week, especially in an unfamiliar setting.

    Like Rob Rang's report on the South team, I deciphered my practice notes into 10 coherent observations from the North team's practice on Monday.

    1. DT Aaron Donald was an unstoppable force on Monday. Like his play all season, the Pitt defensive tackle was extremely quick in drills and was relentless from snap to whistle. His burst and anticipation off the snap and active energy to fight through and around blocks make him tough for any blocker to handle. Donald repeatedly victimized Baylor OG Cyril Richardson at practice, winning with leverage, hustle and fluidity that Richardson has likely never seen before on the football field. Donald's skill-set is ideal for one-on-one drills so he should shine, but the NFL team that drafts him will get a really good football player.

    2. I feel for the wide receivers on the North team due to the inconsistency from all three quarterbacks on the roster. Miami QB Stephen Morris, Virginia Tech QB Logan Thomas and Clemson QB Tajh Boyd were all inconsistent on day one, which was almost expected after the up-and-down senior seasons of all three. Boyd in particular struggled with accuracy and his ball placement is a strong concern. Thomas threw a few pretty passes that hit receivers between the numbers, but other fastballs hit the ground or sailed over his intended target. The good news for this group? The only place to go from here is up.

    3. Speaking of the wide receivers, I really like the group on the North team. The South squad might have the only senior wideout who ends up being drafted in the top-50 picks (Jordan Matthews), but the mid-round talent at receiver on the North is above average. Wisconsin WR Jared Abbrederis, Wyoming WR Robert Herron and Oregon WR Josh Huff all looked good on Monday before, after and during the catch. All three have a legitimate chance to be drafted in the top-100 and Monday reminded everyone why.

    4. Ohio State OT Jack Mewhort lined up at right tackle and did an excellent job sinking his butt, digging his cleats in the ground and stonewalling rushers. He lined up across from North Carolina DE Kareem Martin (and his long 34 3/8” arms) several times and Mewhort did an excellent job combating hand moves and riding him past the pocket. The former Buckeye is built well for the right tackle position at 6-6 and 306 pounds and has shown consistent improvement from his underclassmen days.

    5. Miami OT Seantrel Henderson continues to be a mystery. He flashed on Monday with his strong, heavy hands to punch and control rushers. But his snap anticipation and balance were up-and-down throughout drills. It's been said time and time again, but if a NFL coaching staff can get Henderson to play focused and ambitious, they'll land themselves a very good player. He is a player to watch this week to see how he responds to the instructions of the Falcons' coaching staff.

    6. Linenwood CB Pierre Desir and Nebraska CB Stanley Jean-Baptiste are both tall, long defensive backs who have the athleticism to turn and run with receivers downfield. They both did a nice job in press-man to get physical at the line of scrimmage and then ride the receiver through the route, although both got away with a little too much holding. Neither are elite when controlling their start/stop momentum, but neither are allergic to contact either. And with several teams who utilize press-man techniques on defense looking for the next Richard Sherman, both Desir and Jean-Baptiste are players to watch this week.

    7. As I mentioned in my Senior Bowl preview, Northern Illinois S Jimmie Ward is the top safety prospect in Mobile this week in my opinion and he played like it on Monday. He overcame a few poor angles early and put together a good practice, showing off his foot quickness and aggressive instincts. A Mobile-native, Ward could make a case to be the top defensive back overall this week.

    8. Louisiana Tech DT Justin Ellis picked up right where he left off last week at the Shrine Game, using his quickness and snap anticipation to surge past blockers before they were in a stance. He is a quick thinker and reacts well to what the blocker wants to do, either attacking with pure momentum or using a spin or sidestep move to get past him. Ellis, who weighed nine pounds lighter from the Shrine Game weigh-ins, has helped himself as much as anyone the past two weeks and shouldn't last long on the draft's third day.

    9. Clemson OT Brandon Thomas played left tackle in college, but he projects better at guard where he can operate in a smaller space and that showed in practice on Monday. He measured in at 34 3/8” arms and will use that length to engage and bury defenders – just ask fellow ACC prospect DE James Gayle out of Virginia Tech who Thomas dominated a few times. But the former Clemson blocker also struggled in space during drills, bringing up questions on whether or not he should stay on the edges.

    10. Yes, he plays on the South squad and this is a North practice review, but I feel compelled to mention North Dakota State OL Billy Turner. He lined up at guard and tackle during practice and showed off his quick feet, upper body strength and mean punch to handle rushers. If Turner can learn to consistently sink his hips and not bend so much at the waist, I truly believe there are several Pro Bowls in his future.




    2014 Senior Bowl: 10 observations from Monday's South practice
    By Rob Rang | The Sports Xchange/CBSSports.com
    January 20, 2014 5:50 pm ET

    More Draft: NFL Mock Drafts | Prospect Rankings | Latest news | Senior Bowl

    The first practice of the 2014 Senior Bowl featured noteworthy performances by the recognizable stars from powerhouses FBS programs you might expect, but a handful of small school prospects also proved capable of handling the big stage.

    Jacksonville Jaguars head coach Gus Bradley and his staff led the South team through a spirited, scripted practice at Fairhope Stadium which featured plenty of one on one matchups, allowing the hundreds of scouts and fans in the stands to evaluate the athleticism of the prospects. Players sported helmets, shoulder pads and plenty of physicality but were not wearing thigh pads and tackling -- as is virtually always the case in all-star game practices -- was forbidden.

    Rather than focus on any one positional group on the first day, I kept my eyes open and head on a swivel. Here are 10 observations from Monday's South practice.

    1. Of the South's quarterbacks, Fresno State's Derek Carr unquestionably possesses the best arm. The ball explodes out of his hand and caught a few of his new teammates by surprise with how quickly it got to them. Carr showed good anticipation, often delivering passes before his receivers turned back to look for the ball.

    2. Eastern Illinois quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo continued the positive momentum he'd gained from the East-West Shrine Game with an impressive initial practice. While he does not possess Carr's howitzer, Garoppolo has a very quick set-up and release and frequently threw led his receivers away from defenders, showing better ball-placement than Carr on several of his throws.

    3. On the defensive side of the ball, Oklahoma cornerback Aaron Colvin demonsrated good speed and fluidity in coverage, as well as excellent leaping ability and timing to knock away passes.

    4. Tennessee right tackle Ju'Wuan James hasn't received a lot of fanfare but he is a smooth athlete at 6-foot-6, 315 pounds. He was beaten on occasion but plays with terrific knee bend and got to the second level during scrimmages.

    5. As impressive James was, arguably the most impressive offensive lineman of the day was North Dakota State's Billy Turner, who possesses a very similar build at 6-foot-5, 316 pounds. Unlike James, Turner struggles a bit with leverage, bending at the waist rather than the knees but he has strong hands and is a good athlete who projects as a quality NFL starter with a little refinement. His upside could push Turner into the top 100 picks, if he isn't there already.

    6. Given his 6-foot-2, 243-pound frame, perhaps it isn't surprising that Auburn's Dee Ford was the most explosive of the South's pass-rushers but he certainly showed the burst to catch the attention of every scout in the stands. Ford is stronger than his size indicates and carried over the strong senior campaign that helped his Tigers qualify for the national championship game into Monday's practice.

    7. While Ford played well, his former Auburn teammates, Chris Davis, struggled a bit fielding punts early in the practice. Davis has a tendency to allow the ball to hit his chest plate, which results in some double-clutching. Oklahoma's Jalen Saunders also struggled in this area. The former Sooners' star also dropped a couple of passes.

    8. San Jose State quarterback David Fales is more of a gamer than a practice-guy but his lack of ideal arm-strength, unfortunately, stood out in comparison to Carr and, to a lesser-extent, Garoppolo. Fales telegraphed some throws (including a short pass over the middle that was intercepted by LSU linebacker Lamin Barrow) and his passes to the perimeter had too much air under them.

    9. Arizona State defensive tackle Will Sutton didn't have the most impressive weigh-in but he showed off his athleticism with a terrific spin move to beat Arkansas center Travis Swanson (who was playing guard) during one-on-one drills late in practice.

    10. Of the linebackers, I was most impressed with BYU's Kyle Van Noy, who frequently is lauded for his ability at the line of scrimmage but showed off his fluidity and instincts in coverage by closing quickly to bat away multliple passes.

    Fellow Senior Analyst Dane Brugler posted his notes from the North's practice, which began two hours later at Ladd-Peebles Stadium in Mobile, where Saturday's game will take place.

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    Re: The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

    Senior Bowl Notes: Tuesday
    Tuesday, January 21, 2014
    Lance Zierlein

    Note from Josh Norris: Rotoworld is happy to partner with The Sideline View's Lance Zierlein, John Harris, and James MacPherson for Senior Bowl week. Each will focus on certain positional groups during practice and share their daily observations. If I have anything to add, a clear distinction will be made.

    Be sure to visit The Sideline View, as they have extended reports on many of these prospects on their site.

    G Cyril Richardson, Baylor - Continued to struggle with his balance. When Richardson was asked to use power, he wins. But, his lateral quickness has been exposed as a weakness. He’s definitely lost the leverage battle against 6’ Pitt DT Aaron Donald. He clearly matches up better against power players like Penn State DT DaQuan Jones.

    S Jimmie Ward, Northern Illinois - A group of Mobile, AL area elementary kids started a “JIM-MIE WARD” chant for homeboy and top safety from NIU Jimmie Ward. After a wonderful career as a Husky after leaving the south, Ward was definitely a player to watch. He’s not disappointed in the slightest. He’s comfortable in coverage, tracking slot receivers as any safety in Mobile. He plays with range in the middle of the field in coverage in cover one/three. He had another solid day on Tuesday.

    DE/OLB Marcus Smith, Louisville - Had a strong day, showing his ability to transition to a 3-4 OLB and playing standing up. He’s proven from a movement standpoint that he can fit at that position. He didn’t shine from a pass rush standpoint from a stand up position but that might take a little bit of time. He was comfortable dropping in coverage and and knocked down a pass after dropping on one quick throw during practice. He’s not as violent with his hands, especially on his pass rush, but the athleticism and scheme versatility should raise his profile in the eyes of the NFL scouts.

    WR Jared Abbrederis, Wisconsin - Continues to get open. All day, every day. His route running is just so good and he’s having little trouble getting off of press coverage. The only other receiver making more of an impact is…

    WR Robert Herron, Wyoming - Wow. He continues to make one catch after another at every spot on the field. Love this guy’s quicks, his route running and his LA-style toughness (played his HS ball at Dorsey High in Los Angeles)

    C Weston Richburg, Colorado State - Has been playing well, even if not a ton of people are taking notice. He played with a strong base, especially against some strong interior players Penn State DT DaQuan Jones and Minnesota DT/DE Ra’Shede Hageman. He won’t be flashy, but he’s been steady, playing with sound technique against guys 15+ lb heavier than him.

    DT DaQuan Jones, Penn State - Continues to play with great leverage and push the pocket from the interior. For weaker OL, he’s a tough draw inside. It’s been good to see him consistent as some scouts (and JH too) have questioned his week in and week out production when he was at Penn State.

    G Brandon Linder, Miami - Had an up and down day - some great reps, some sorry reps. He definitely looks the part at times, but questions have arisen as to whether his technique issues can be solved by an NFL staff. A perfect example of this was when he stoned DaQuan Jones on one rep and on the next set of reps he got rag dolled by Minnesota’s Ra’Shede Hageman.

    One of the best match ups all day long was the pass rush battle between West Virginia RB Charles Sims and UCLA LB Jordan Zumwalt. Sims more than held his own against the UCLA ILB, but the last couple of reps went to Zumwalt. Nothing pleases scouts more than to see guys compete at that level.

    OL Kadeem Edwards, Tennessee State - Had a much better practice on Tuesday as he adjusted to the increase in speed, size and ability. He fought his tail off against Louisville DE/OLB Marcus Smith and La. Tech DT Justin Ellis. Meanwhile, Virginia Tech DE James Gayle got chewed out by his position coach early in practice, but bounced back knocking Ohio State OT Jack Mewhort on his wallet in 1-on-1 pass rush drill.

    T/G Zack Martin, Notre Dame - Showed good change of direction to handle inside pass rush moves and a strong move that jarred Virginia Tech DE James Gayle. Martin did overset on one rep and knocked off balance by West Virginia DE Will Clarke.

    S Deone Bucannon, Washington State - Finally was heard from on Tuesday. And, by “heard from”, I mean literally. He popped Wisconsin RB James White in the open field that got a reaction from the NFL people on hand.

    LT Jack Mewhort, Ohio State - Had his fair share of battles with Stanford DE Trent Murphy, splitting 50/50 with the great Stanford DE. Murphy got the corner on Mewhort and as we saw in the Orange Bowl, Mewhort struggled with that hard, quick and powerful edge rush. If he’s got a coaching point to address, it’s just that. On Murphy, he had a good, solid practice, showing good edge setting ability and the ability to defeat the shoulder of the tackles that he faced and win without being run around the arc very often.

    T Michael Schofield, Michigan - Truly struggled in 1-on-1 drills with his core strength but in scrimmage/11 on 11 he played much better in the run game in tandem with the rest of his line. Schofield will show better in team situations than he will when exposed and naked in 1-on-1 drills.

    One of the tragedies of the day was what looked like a gruesome injury to Oklahoma CB Aaron Colvin’s leg. He was assisted off the field and it didn’t look good. That said, he was having a strong two days to start the Senior Bowl. Colvin suffered a torn ACL.

    CB Jaylen Watkins, Florida - Was excellent in coverage on Tuesday. Perhaps the best play that we saw all day long was Watkins’ interception during 1-on-1s when he was covering Tulane WR Ryan Grant. Watkins trailed the route and then darted in front on the deep dig for a tremendous interception. He was excellent in coverage in every phase of the practice.

    WR Kevin Norwood, Alabama - Again, looked good in competitive aspects of the practice. Go 1-on-1 with a corner and he lights it up. He went deep on Auburn CB Chris Davis, high pointed the throw from the QB and came down with a tremendous catch. He continues to shine in those situations and solid in team drills.

    Many of the South DB have said that Vanderbilt WR Jordan Matthews is the best receiver they’ve faced. Not just here in Mobile but all year. He continues to show that throughout the past two days. He had some decent battles with Utah’s 6’3” CB Keith McGill but Matthews came out ahead in most of those 1-on-1 situations.

    The South offensive line truly struggled all day long. That unit had a couple of decent run moments during team 11-on-11 drill, but really got exposed during run/pass 1-on-1.

    Speaking of OL problems, NDSU T Billy Turner had his worst day and perhaps the worst day that any player had at the Senior Bowl. He struggled with Auburn DE Dee Ford’s speed. He struggled with Arkansas DE Chris Smith’s whirling dervish, maniacal edge rush. He struggled with power. He lost his confidence and it was evident late in practice. I hope he can get it back on Wednesday.

    DT/DE Caraun Reid, Princeton - Was up and down throughout practice. He’s definitely not out of place here in Mobile, but he’ll show some flashes and he competes like no other. But, there are times when he’s gotten beat. It happens, but Reid has shown that he’ll bounce back quickly.

    T Wesley Johnson, Vanderbilt - Struggled badly in run blocking 1-on-1 or half line situations, but in pass protection he was the best of the South squad on Tuesday. During team drills, he also performed better than his South cohorts.

    DE Dee Ford, Auburn - Hasn’t been blocked once off the edge. He’s been unreal. Florida State OLB Christian Jones came down to pass rush 1-on-1s and lit up the South tackles as well. Arkansas DE Chris Smith is one of the most interesting guys on the South team. He’s just under 6’1”, but he’s 262 and plays as low to the ground without losing his feet as any player I’ve seen. He’s got shoulders stretching across the room. Ford, Jones and Smith administered a proper whipping on the South OL on Tuesday.

    G Gabe Jackson, Mississippi State - did what he does best in the running game which is play with power when guys are in front of him while struggling to make cutoff blocks when asked to from the backside. Overall, however, it was a strong day for Robinson as he consistently had defenders locked out at the end of his arms in pass pro drills.

    G Jon Halapio, Florida - Continues to show punishing strength in his hands despite some ups and downs in pass protection. Halapio had one of the strongest punches of the day putting a big shot on Will Sutton and consistently made his play side blocks in the scrimmage session.

    While I’m not sure the motor revs as highly as you would want, and as consistently as you would want with massive Tennessee DT Daniel McCullers, he really put together a nice body of work against this variety of offensive linemen he faced on Tuesday.

    On tape, Virginia LT Morgan Moses looks stiff and too upright, but the fact of the matter is that he got guys blocked today while the athletic Billy Turner struggled. Moses used his long frame and experience to get out and get defenders cut off around the edge and he showed the instincts you want to see from a guy who is up and down athletically.

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    Re: The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

    Senior Bowl Notes: Tuesday
    Tuesday, January 21, 2014
    Lance Zierlein

    Note from Josh Norris: Rotoworld is happy to partner with The Sideline View's Lance Zierlein, John Harris, and James MacPherson for Senior Bowl week. Each will focus on certain positional groups during practice and share their daily observations. If I have anything to add, a clear distinction will be made.

    Be sure to visit The Sideline View, as they have extended reports on many of these prospects on their site.

    G Cyril Richardson, Baylor - Continued to struggle with his balance. When Richardson was asked to use power, he wins. But, his lateral quickness has been exposed as a weakness. He’s definitely lost the leverage battle against 6’ Pitt DT Aaron Donald. He clearly matches up better against power players like Penn State DT DaQuan Jones.

    S Jimmie Ward, Northern Illinois - A group of Mobile, AL area elementary kids started a “JIM-MIE WARD” chant for homeboy and top safety from NIU Jimmie Ward. After a wonderful career as a Husky after leaving the south, Ward was definitely a player to watch. He’s not disappointed in the slightest. He’s comfortable in coverage, tracking slot receivers as any safety in Mobile. He plays with range in the middle of the field in coverage in cover one/three. He had another solid day on Tuesday.

    DE/OLB Marcus Smith, Louisville - Had a strong day, showing his ability to transition to a 3-4 OLB and playing standing up. He’s proven from a movement standpoint that he can fit at that position. He didn’t shine from a pass rush standpoint from a stand up position but that might take a little bit of time. He was comfortable dropping in coverage and and knocked down a pass after dropping on one quick throw during practice. He’s not as violent with his hands, especially on his pass rush, but the athleticism and scheme versatility should raise his profile in the eyes of the NFL scouts.

    WR Jared Abbrederis, Wisconsin - Continues to get open. All day, every day. His route running is just so good and he’s having little trouble getting off of press coverage. The only other receiver making more of an impact is…

    WR Robert Herron, Wyoming - Wow. He continues to make one catch after another at every spot on the field. Love this guy’s quicks, his route running and his LA-style toughness (played his HS ball at Dorsey High in Los Angeles)

    C Weston Richburg, Colorado State - Has been playing well, even if not a ton of people are taking notice. He played with a strong base, especially against some strong interior players Penn State DT DaQuan Jones and Minnesota DT/DE Ra’Shede Hageman. He won’t be flashy, but he’s been steady, playing with sound technique against guys 15+ lb heavier than him.

    DT DaQuan Jones, Penn State - Continues to play with great leverage and push the pocket from the interior. For weaker OL, he’s a tough draw inside. It’s been good to see him consistent as some scouts (and JH too) have questioned his week in and week out production when he was at Penn State.

    G Brandon Linder, Miami - Had an up and down day - some great reps, some sorry reps. He definitely looks the part at times, but questions have arisen as to whether his technique issues can be solved by an NFL staff. A perfect example of this was when he stoned DaQuan Jones on one rep and on the next set of reps he got rag dolled by Minnesota’s Ra’Shede Hageman.

    One of the best match ups all day long was the pass rush battle between West Virginia RB Charles Sims and UCLA LB Jordan Zumwalt. Sims more than held his own against the UCLA ILB, but the last couple of reps went to Zumwalt. Nothing pleases scouts more than to see guys compete at that level.

    OL Kadeem Edwards, Tennessee State - Had a much better practice on Tuesday as he adjusted to the increase in speed, size and ability. He fought his tail off against Louisville DE/OLB Marcus Smith and La. Tech DT Justin Ellis. Meanwhile, Virginia Tech DE James Gayle got chewed out by his position coach early in practice, but bounced back knocking Ohio State OT Jack Mewhort on his wallet in 1-on-1 pass rush drill.

    T/G Zack Martin, Notre Dame - Showed good change of direction to handle inside pass rush moves and a strong move that jarred Virginia Tech DE James Gayle. Martin did overset on one rep and knocked off balance by West Virginia DE Will Clarke.

    S Deone Bucannon, Washington State - Finally was heard from on Tuesday. And, by “heard from”, I mean literally. He popped Wisconsin RB James White in the open field that got a reaction from the NFL people on hand.

    LT Jack Mewhort, Ohio State - Had his fair share of battles with Stanford DE Trent Murphy, splitting 50/50 with the great Stanford DE. Murphy got the corner on Mewhort and as we saw in the Orange Bowl, Mewhort struggled with that hard, quick and powerful edge rush. If he’s got a coaching point to address, it’s just that. On Murphy, he had a good, solid practice, showing good edge setting ability and the ability to defeat the shoulder of the tackles that he faced and win without being run around the arc very often.

    T Michael Schofield, Michigan - Truly struggled in 1-on-1 drills with his core strength but in scrimmage/11 on 11 he played much better in the run game in tandem with the rest of his line. Schofield will show better in team situations than he will when exposed and naked in 1-on-1 drills.

    One of the tragedies of the day was what looked like a gruesome injury to Oklahoma CB Aaron Colvin’s leg. He was assisted off the field and it didn’t look good. That said, he was having a strong two days to start the Senior Bowl. Colvin suffered a torn ACL.

    CB Jaylen Watkins, Florida - Was excellent in coverage on Tuesday. Perhaps the best play that we saw all day long was Watkins’ interception during 1-on-1s when he was covering Tulane WR Ryan Grant. Watkins trailed the route and then darted in front on the deep dig for a tremendous interception. He was excellent in coverage in every phase of the practice.

    WR Kevin Norwood, Alabama - Again, looked good in competitive aspects of the practice. Go 1-on-1 with a corner and he lights it up. He went deep on Auburn CB Chris Davis, high pointed the throw from the QB and came down with a tremendous catch. He continues to shine in those situations and solid in team drills.

    Many of the South DB have said that Vanderbilt WR Jordan Matthews is the best receiver they’ve faced. Not just here in Mobile but all year. He continues to show that throughout the past two days. He had some decent battles with Utah’s 6’3” CB Keith McGill but Matthews came out ahead in most of those 1-on-1 situations.

    The South offensive line truly struggled all day long. That unit had a couple of decent run moments during team 11-on-11 drill, but really got exposed during run/pass 1-on-1.

    Speaking of OL problems, NDSU T Billy Turner had his worst day and perhaps the worst day that any player had at the Senior Bowl. He struggled with Auburn DE Dee Ford’s speed. He struggled with Arkansas DE Chris Smith’s whirling dervish, maniacal edge rush. He struggled with power. He lost his confidence and it was evident late in practice. I hope he can get it back on Wednesday.

    DT/DE Caraun Reid, Princeton - Was up and down throughout practice. He’s definitely not out of place here in Mobile, but he’ll show some flashes and he competes like no other. But, there are times when he’s gotten beat. It happens, but Reid has shown that he’ll bounce back quickly.

    T Wesley Johnson, Vanderbilt - Struggled badly in run blocking 1-on-1 or half line situations, but in pass protection he was the best of the South squad on Tuesday. During team drills, he also performed better than his South cohorts.

    DE Dee Ford, Auburn - Hasn’t been blocked once off the edge. He’s been unreal. Florida State OLB Christian Jones came down to pass rush 1-on-1s and lit up the South tackles as well. Arkansas DE Chris Smith is one of the most interesting guys on the South team. He’s just under 6’1”, but he’s 262 and plays as low to the ground without losing his feet as any player I’ve seen. He’s got shoulders stretching across the room. Ford, Jones and Smith administered a proper whipping on the South OL on Tuesday.

    G Gabe Jackson, Mississippi State - did what he does best in the running game which is play with power when guys are in front of him while struggling to make cutoff blocks when asked to from the backside. Overall, however, it was a strong day for Robinson as he consistently had defenders locked out at the end of his arms in pass pro drills.

    G Jon Halapio, Florida - Continues to show punishing strength in his hands despite some ups and downs in pass protection. Halapio had one of the strongest punches of the day putting a big shot on Will Sutton and consistently made his play side blocks in the scrimmage session.

    While I’m not sure the motor revs as highly as you would want, and as consistently as you would want with massive Tennessee DT Daniel McCullers, he really put together a nice body of work against this variety of offensive linemen he faced on Tuesday.

    On tape, Virginia LT Morgan Moses looks stiff and too upright, but the fact of the matter is that he got guys blocked today while the athletic Billy Turner struggled. Moses used his long frame and experience to get out and get defenders cut off around the edge and he showed the instincts you want to see from a guy who is up and down athletically.

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    Re: The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

    Russ Lande’s Senior Bowl Notebook: Day 2
    Posted on January 21, 2014
    by Russ Lande

    Former NFL scout and national draft expert Russ Lande will be providing NFL draft insights at Sports on Earth throughout the offseason. Here are his notes after two days of Senior Bowl practices.

    Players who have shined through two days of practice at the Senior Bowl

    Ra’Shede Hageman, DT, Minnesota (6’6, 318 lbs)
    Hageman is built with long arms and a naturally long frame, and through two days of practice has used both to his advantage. Through the use of truly explosive first-step quickness, he converts quickness to power and runs through contact, both on the interior and on the edge. He has also shown a variety of pass rush moves and good hand technique. Displaying great functional strength and playing with outstanding leverage, he has been one of the most dominant defensive linemen at the Senior Bowl thus far.

    Jaylen Watkins, CB, Florida (5’11 3/8”, 194 lbs)
    Watkins flashed NFL ability during team drills by getting involved in a variety of ways. He stood his ground with Vanderbilt WR Jordan Matthews and broke up a pass attempt from San Jose State QB David Fales. Later, he batted away a throw by Virginia Tech QB Logan Thomas. He also forced a fumble coming up in run support, but his most impressive play came in man coverage against a deep route. He was able to pin his man to the boundary with his speed and physicality, leaving the quarterback almost no room to complete the throw.

    Jared Abbrederis, WR, Wisconsin (6’0 7/8”, 187 lbs)
    Abbrederis has shown excellent body control and superior hands throughout two days here in Mobile. Quicker than fast, he runs outstanding routes and gets his head around quickly to find the ball in the air. He has also shown the ability to consistently get open in the short and intermediate areas of the field.

    Aaron Donald, DT Pittsburgh (6’0 7/8”, 288 lbs.)
    In December, Donald cleaned up on the awards circuit by winning the Bednarik Award, Outland Trophy, Lombardi Award and Nagurski Award, and through two days of Senior Bowl practices he has been one of most impressive prospects. Despite his lack of ideal size, he has proven himself more than capable of holding his own at the line of scrimmage because of his heavy hands, ability to maintain base/leverage and quick feet. In pass-rush drills, he has been nothing short of dominant, as interior blockers have struggled to deal with his hand usage and wide variety of moves.

    Chris Borland, LB Wisconsin (5’11 3/8”, 245 lbs.)
    Chris Borland has shined at both practices, displaying the most athleticism and versatility of all the linebackers. While shorter than ideal for a linebacker, he was consistently fast when reading and reacting to the run. Vitally important in today’s pass-first NFL, Borland has proven that he can excel in zone and man coverage. The most impressive area of his game this week has been his pass-rush skills. He has consistently demonstrated the explosiveness, change of direction, flexibility and a wide variety of pass-rush moves to defeat pass block.

    Zack Martin, OT Notre Dame (6’4 1/8”, 305 lbs.)
    Zack Martin is not an impressive specimen “on the hoof,” as he looks more like a center than a tackle. However, has had made it clear with his play through two practices in Mobile that he is very capable of playing on the edge at the NFL level. He has been very aggressive initiating contact with strong punches. He has also shown the footwork needed to slide and redirect to adjust to quick change-of-direction pass rush moves. While he’ll never be considered a road grader in the run game, his ability to win with initial strikes and get his feet around on seal blocks makes him just as effective when run blocking as he is in pass protection.

    Antonio Andrews, RB, Western Kentucky (5’10 1/8”, 225 lbs.)
    All-Star game practices are traditionally a difficult format for RBs to shine in because of the limited hitting and tackling, but Andrews has really done his part to stand out from the pack. He looked like a rock star at the weigh-in, as he possesses the ideal bulk in his frame NFL teams want at the position. His size and natural leverage has translated well onto the practice field, as he was shockingly dominant in one-on-one pass blocking drills because of his punch, base and shuffle. On interior runs he showed the quickness and decisiveness to get through small holes before they closed, and he also flashed the quiet hands and open field elusiveness in the passing game that scouts and execs are sure to love.

    Players who have struggled through two days of practice at the Senior Bowl

    Cody Hoffman, WR, BYU (6’3 7/8”, 218 lbs)
    Hoffman has been a disappointment. He initially impresses with his size and physique. However, as soon as he starts moving, issues arise. He is stiff and really labored in his routes and slows down when he has to turn his head to find the ball, which can be a killer for an NFL receiver. In addition, Hoffman does not get his head and hands around quickly when he comes out of his cuts, which makes it hard for him to catch passes that get on top of him fast.

    Kevin Norwood, WR, Alabama (6’2, 197 lbs)
    Norwood has struggled through two days of practice. Despite flashing the hands to make some tough catches, he was lazy in drill work to the point where a coach told him to step it up. In one drill he stumbled and then just basically quit instead of finishing the rep. When he was matched up against Auburn cornerback Chris Davis, he struggled initially to get off the jam and just gave up on route instead of finishing the drill.

    David Fales, QB, San Jose State (6’1, 220 lbs)
    A highly productive passer in college, Fales’ lack of arm strength showed up on Monday and was even more of an issue Tuesday as the winds were gusting throughout practice and affected his throws. His footwork has not been strong and he has been the worst of the quarterbacks in Mobile at this point.

    Jack Mewhort, OT, Ohio State (6’5 5/8”, 306 lbs)
    Mewhort has simply lacked the quickness to defend the edge against this level of competition. He flashed the competitiveness NFL teams want, but was simply too stiff and unathletic in all drills. He may need to slide inside to guard in order to play at the next level.

    Michael Sam, DE/OLB, Missouri (6’1 5/8”, 260 lbs)
    There has been a significant buzz in the draft community about the pass rush skills of Sam, but in one-on-one drills he has consistently been a beat late off the snap, and has not shown the explosiveness or hand usage needed to beat his blocker. While he has looked athletic during linebacker and seven-on-seven passing drills, he has appeared at times to be confused on coverage drops, and consequently has allowed multiple receptions to receivers in his zone.

    Gabe Ikard, C, Oklahoma (6’3 ¼”, 302 lbs)
    Ikard failed to impress during Shrine Game practices in St. Petersburg last week, thus it was a surprise to see him called up to face top level competition in Mobile this week. Unfortunately he has continued to show poor strength at the line of scrimmage, as he has often appeared to be physically outmatched. In one-on-one drills he has struggled moving laterally, and simply has not shown the athleticism needed to start at the next level.

    Injury Note: Oklahoma CB Aaron Colvin was injured on Tuesday during practice, and it has been reported as a torn ACL, so he is done for the week and will not be able to workout at the combine.

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    Re: The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

    Senior Bowl: This week's standouts
    January, 23, 2014
    By Todd McShay, Steve Muench and Kevin Weidl | ESPN.com

    MOBILE, Ala. -- The Senior Bowl game isn’t until Saturday, but the individual drills, group drills and team sessions in practices Monday through Thursday have already given us a very good idea of what the prospects here this week bring to the table.

    Here is our take on the prospects whose skills separated them from the others in areas specific to their respective positions. Which QB has the strongest arm? Who is the fastest receiver? Consider these the prospect superlatives for the 2014 Senior Bowl.

    QUARTERBACKS
    Best footwork: Jimmy Garoppolo, Eastern Illinois
    Garoppolo has shown the most precise footwork of any QB here this week. We've been impressed with his ability to marry his eyes to his feet while going through his progressions.

    Strongest arm: Logan Thomas, Virginia Tech
    This one's not even close. Thomas has elite arm strength to push the ball vertically. The windy conditions on Tuesday gave him an opportunity to show off that arm.

    Quickest release: Derek Carr, Fresno State
    Carr's above-average arm strength isn't the only reason he can get the ball from Point A to Point B. Once Carr makes up his mind where he's going with the football, he gets it out of his hands more quickly than any QB here. Garoppolo was a close second.

    RUNNING BACKS
    Most versatile: Charles Sims, West Virginia
    Even though he has smaller hands, Sims catches the ball well and he's an above-average route-runner in addition to his lateral quickness as a ball-carrier.

    Vision/Instincts: Antonio Andrews, Western Kentucky
    Andrews is a strong between-the-tackles runner who has shown good patience and vision while making the most of his blocks.

    WIDE RECEIVERS
    Best vertical speed: Josh Huff, Oregon
    We were surprised by Huff's quick start and extra gear when tracking the ball down vertically.

    Best separation skills: Robert Herron, Wyoming
    While Herron has had a hard time fielding the ball this week, he's been the most explosive transitioning in and out of breaks.

    Best ball skills: Ryan Grant, Tulane and Kevin Norwood, Alabama
    Grant and Norwood were the most consistent pass-catchers here this week as they both showed natural hands and good body control when adjusting to throws.

    OFFENSIVE LINEMEN
    Best run-blocker: OT/OG Zack Martin, Notre Dame
    Martin makes up for his lack of overwhelming power with quick feet, sound hand placement and tenacity.

    Best pass protector: OT Morgan Moses, Virginia
    Moses can work on his consistency, but he uses his length to cut off the edge, shows the ability to redirect and is strong enough to anchor.

    Best technique: OT Jack Mewhort, Ohio State
    Mewhort's initial footwork, hand placement and pad level were consistently sound this week.

    Toughest: OC Bryan Stork, Florida State
    Stork lacks prototypical measurables, but his effort and fight throughout the week were among the best we've seen of any lineman in this class.

    DEFENSIVE LINEMEN
    Best interior rusher: Aaron Donald, Pittsburgh
    Donald showed the ability to beat offensive linemen with quickness, power and active hands, and his ability to do it so many different ways make it that much harder to keep him off the quarterback.

    Best edge-rusher: Dee Ford, Auburn
    Ford was by far the most explosive edge-rusher here. On top of that, we were highly impressed with his flexibility to bend the edge.

    Strongest interior run-stuffer: DaQuan Jones, Penn State
    At 6-3½ and 323 pounds, Jones is as tough to move off the ball as you would expect with a player his size. He's flashed heavy hands all week.

    Best edge-setter: Brent Urban, Virginia
    He's got a great-looking frame. He did a great job playing with quality pad level and using his length to stack and shed blockers to consistently maintain edge responsibility.

    LINEBACKERS
    Best Instincts: ILB Chris Borland, Wisconsin
    Borland read his keys and located the ball quicker than any other linebackers here. His instincts increase his already above-average range.

    Best range: OLB Jonathan Brown, Illinois
    Brown covered a lot of ground chasing the run and in coverage, which is important for a linebacker who doesn't have great size.

    Best pass-rusher: OLB Jeremiah Attaouchu, Georgia Tech
    One of Attaouchu's greatest strengths on film is his ability to get to the quarterback, and it showed up here as well. He has good initial quickness, active hands and good balance.

    Best in coverage: OLB Telvin Smith, Florida State
    Smith is almost built like a safety, so it’s no surprise as that he's so fluid in coverage. He's light on his feet, changes direction well and shows above-average closing burst. It should be noted he didn't catch the ball well this week, but he showed his ability to get his hands on throws.

    DEFENSIVE BACKS
    Best press technique: CB Stanley Jean-Baptiste, Nebraska
    Jean-Baptiste has above-average size and uses his length well to disrupt receivers' releases. He also has above-average balance and fluidity for a taller corner and, being a former receiver, appears natural locating and playing the football.

    Best man-to-man cover skills: CB Jaylen Watkins, Florida
    Watkins showed quick feet, above-average fluidity and transitioned well out of his breaks, not to mention he also flashed good anticipation and route-recognition skills to get early breaks on throws. Utah State's Nevin Lawson also flashed well here this week.

    Most versatile: S Dez Southward, Wisconsin
    At 6-0⅛ and 206 pounds, Southward is big enough to lineup at safety, at which he shows good recognition skills, range, plus the ability to play the run. He didn't show great fluidity at corner, but he's smart and he has enough foot speed to line up there depending on the matchup.

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    Re: The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

    2014 Senior Bowl: Auburn's Dee Ford headlines list of Risers-Fallers
    By Rob Rang | The Sports Xchange/CBSSports.com
    January 25, 2014 7:22 pm ET

    A year ago a relative unknown offensive tackle from Central Michigan began his climb towards the No. 1 overall selection in the 2013 NFL draft with a dominant performance at the Senior Bowl.

    With underclassmen expected to dominate this year's first round, no one from the 2014 Senior Bowl is going to match Eric Fisher's perch atop the draft. However, revealing performances during the all-important week of practice and the game, itself, is certain to impact NFL draft boards.

    Here are the 10 players who helped their NFL stock the most at the Senior Bowl, followed by five players who were unable to answer scouts' concerns during the Mobile, Ala. all-star game.

    Helped Themselves:

    Dee Ford, DE, Auburn: Ford impressed with a chiseled build at 6-foot-2, 243 pounds during the weigh-in and was virtually unstoppable off the edge during the practices, showing burst, bend and closing speed. He was the most dynamic player on the field during the game, recording two sacks and timing a leap to knock down a pass to earn MVP honors. Ford's dominant week boosted his stock at least a full round and could result in a top 32 selection.

    Aaron Donald, DT, Pittsburgh: It was Donald, not Ford, who earned most of the buzz early in the week, whipping interior offensive linemen with his quickness, tenacity and underrated strength. Like Ford, Donald's size (6-foot-1, 288 pounds) limits his fits in the NFL but his ability to pressure quarterbacks could earn him a first-round selection.

    Jimmie Ward, S, Northern Illinois: Scouts knew heading into the Senior Bowl that Ward possessed the fluidity and instincts to cover but competition in the MAC is much different than in Mobile. Athletic enough to handle deep coverage, as well as slide down to cover slot receivers, Ward was the Senior Bowl's most impressive pass defender this year.

    Crockett Gillmore, TE, Colorado State - Gilmore came in late to the Senior Bowl as an injury replacement, but the former defensive end impressed scouts immediately with his size and overall athleticism. He really caught fire during Thursday's practice, extending to haul in an impressive touchdown and continued his stellar play in the game itself.

    Weston Richburg, OC, Colorado State: Arkansas' Travis Swanson entered the week as the nation's top center prospect, but an impressive showing by another CSU Ram has his stock rising quickly. Richburg showed the anchor to handle powerful bull-rushers, as well as impressive agility in getting to the second level.

    Brandon Thomas, OL, Clemson: The unquestioned top offensive lineman in Mobile this week was Notre Dame's Zach Martin, who starred at left tackle for the Irish but projects better at guard due to his short arms. Thomas didn't earn nearly the media attention but also performed well at tackle despite a frame (6-foot-3 and a 1/2, 314 pounds) that suggests he too will be making the move inside in the NFL. Late in the game, Thomas was playing outside at tackle with Martin asked to move inside to guard.

    Caraun Reid, DT, Princeton: The well-built Ivy Leaguer proved with a competitive week of practice that he was every bit the talent as the more well-known prospects he was facing each snap. He capped off the week with sacks on back-to-back plays during the game, showing the lateral burst and closing speed to project nicely as a three-technique defensive tackle.

    Morgan Moses, OT, Virginia: At 6-foot-6, 325 pounds, Moses possesses the frame you'd expect of a dominating run blocker and he showed the ability to clear wide rushing lanes throughout the week. Moses boosted his stock this week, however, by providing reliable pass protection, demonstrating the arm length (34 3/4"), balance and surprising athleticism teams are looking for in a top-64 selection.

    Ryan Grant, WR, Tulane: At a rock-solid 6-foot-0, 197 pounds, Grant showed surprising burst, as well as the agility as a route-runner and reliable hands to out-play several more highly-touted pass catchers. A long touchdown during Wednesday's practice drew plenty of praise from scouts.

    Christian Kirksey, OLB, Iowa: The Big Ten remains one of college football's most consistent producers of pro-ready linebackers and Kirksey turned heads this week with his athleticism and instincts. A particularly impressive tackle early in the Senior Bowl game showed off his closing speed.

    Missed Opportunity:

    Tajh Boyd, QB, Clemson: Despite media reports to the contrary, Boyd's inaccuracy throughout the week of practice and game itself has his stock slipping. He possesses plenty of arm strength but was erratic, spraying the ball over the field. An ugly interception early in the Senior Bowl set the tone for a disappointing performance from the North Team's offense, as a whole.

    Cyril Richardson, OG, Baylor: At 6-foot-4, 344 pounds, Richardson is a massive interior presence, but he struggled with quicker defensive tackles throughout the week of practice (especially Donald) and wasn't nearly as powerful as a drive blocker as one might expect given his size.

    Jordan Matthews, WR, Vanderbilt: Matthews' production in the SEC speaks for itself, but he dropped a handful of passes throughout the week of practice. Even more alarming, he showed little in terms of burst or straight-line speed, struggling to gain separation from opposing cornerbacks.

    Will Sutton, DT, Arizona State: Sutton's quickness and power helped him record a tackle-for-loss early in the game, but in weighing in at a soft 315 pounds at under 6-foot-1 did him no favors with scouts. There is no question that the reigning Defensive Player of the Year possesses talent, but questions about his commitment towards reaching his full potential could push him deep into the draft's second day.

    Stephen Morris, QB, Miami: Morris earned the nickname "Tin Cup" from some scouts at the Senior Bowl due to his ability to make the amazing throw but struggles with the routine passes commonplace in every NFL offense. Morris boasts a strong arm and throws the deep ball with touch, but like the other two quarterbacks on the North squad (Boyd and Virginia Tech's Logan Thomas), he struggled with accuracy throughout the week.






    Norris: Senior Bowl Review
    Josh Norris
    All Star Circuit
    Saturday, January 25, 2014

    The purpose of Senior Bowl week is to supplement completed area-scout evaluations in practice and interviews. No evaluations are based on a single week’s performance, but certain prospects did help (or potentially hurt) their status and will force evaluators to take a second look at their live game action. I will breakdown each position below and rank participating performers accordingly. Please note, this is not strictly based on how these prospects did this week, instead it is based on their complete evaluation up to this point.

    For comparison, here is how I ranked the attendees prior to this week. Also, I was able to watch coaching practice tape for every 1 on 1 OL/DL drill and CB/WR drill this week, which allowed me to focus on specific prospects in these important matchups.

    The crew over at The Sideline View did a great job posting daily practice notes. Here are the entries from Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.

    Be sure to check out my top-25 Senior Bowlers exiting the event.

    Quarterbacks
    1. Derek Carr, Fresno State - Nothing changed this week regarding Carr’s evaluation, as his exposure to interior pressure is still limited. We know he has an arm to hit every level of the field despite throwing plenty of screens in college. Carr doesn’t always throw from a balanced base, but he has improved willingness to take a hit on release. His footwork can be a mess, though, and that will frustrate the fanbase where he lands, similarly to Jay Cutler or Matthew Stafford. Carr has a great arm and he knows it. Take a look at Greg Peshek’s QB Metrics.

    2. Jimmy Garoppolo, Eastern Illinois - Garoppolo entered this event as the No. 2 QB and he leaves as such. Many offenses rely on quick decision makers with a quick release, and Garoppolo can absolutely check these boxes. Things change a bit when pressured, as the quarterback has a tendency to drift laterally rather than step up or work from a phone booth. Garoppolo will end up in the crowded tier of passers after the top four, but do not be surprised if he tops that group. He displays mobility, touch, velocity, placement and a willingness to hit receivers at every level of the field.

    3. David Fales, San Jose State - Fales is a cerebral pocket mover, showing very little attention to bodies moving around him. He can be effective in tight spaces before taking a hit and has the footwork to bounce off of his back foot and create operational space if needed. Placement, touch, timing, and anticipation are all above average qualities. Those four skills can compensate for other deficiencies, specifically velocity.

    4. Logan Thomas, Virginia Tech - Thomas is not good, but his perceived upside likely places him over the other two passers on this list. Many times, Thomas looks great in terms of stature and pocket movement, and then he throws the football. Progression once reaching the NFL is discussed more than it actually happens, but Thomas will get a shot to be a team’s QB in waiting.

    5. Tajh Boyd, Clemson - I really like Boyd’s pocket movement and ability to throw from multiple arm angles. However, his placement is terrible and it has not improved. So many of his passes were touch throws that allowed WRs to win at the catch point. He tended to work to the check down without actually checking to see if it was available.

    6. Stephen Morris, Miami - I am not upset, I am just disappointed. Morris regressed this season rather than taking the jump many of us expected. He is undraftable. That might be a surprise coming from someone who was hyping up Morris before the season, but he is solely a vertical passer.

    Running Backs
    1. Charles Sims, West Virginia - Sims displayed a great combination of receiving ability and pass protection this week. Runners can show very little during the week due to the lack of opportunities to break first contact. Sims could be selected in the third-round.

    2. James White, Wisconsin - White is a compact back with a very thick lower half. He was given many of Wisconsin’s third down responsibilities, and that carried over into the week.

    3. Lorenzo Taliaferro, Coastal Carolina - This is all about pass protection. The Coastal Carolina product displayed toughness to absorb first contact and mirror on counter moves.


    Wide Receivers
    1. Jordan Matthews, Vanderbilt - I was surprised to see Matthews struggle against press coverage some this week. With that said, he did not hurt himself this week. I doubt Matthews is selected in the first-round. He is very technical in terms of balance, footwork, and wasted movement. His after catch ability seems to be underrated as well.

    2. Ryan Grant, Tulane - I know the Tulane product spent a great deal of time in the slot, but I project him to the outside. Grant does not shine in any one area. He finds soft areas in coverage and his first step off the line is difficult to slow down. Grant also understands stemming his opposition, forcing them to flip their hips which allows for the receiver to break off his route.

    3. Jared Abbrederis, Wisconsin - Despite exiting the week early due to a hamstring injury, Abbrederis did nothing to hurt his evaluation. Put on his game against Ohio State, specifically Bradley Roby, and you will see impressive adjustments once the ball is in the air along with great body control.

    4. Shaq Evans, UCLA - If only Evans could consistently catch the football. Check out this piece by Matt Waldman where he asked Evans and other receivers about the slight nuances of the position. Evans stood out.


    Slot Receiver
    1. Robert Herron, Wyoming - Herron is extremely slippery from the slot, and if the defensive back fails to get a hand on the receiver, he will only generate more separation. Herron did have a few drops earlier in the week, but this was not an issue at Wyoming.

    2. Jalen Saunders, Oklahoma - Saunders will get knocked by many due to his size (5’9/166). He wins in some very specific areas, however, specifically in space and as a returner. Saunders will struggle with physical coverage, as he might not be able to absorb it and continue on his route, but Saunders is quick enough to keep DBs moving.

    3. Michael Campanaro, Wake Forest - I do not judge injuries, so the fact that Campanaro missed multiple games while hurt does not impact my evaluation. He is a very quick player in the short to intermediate areas of the field but also shows off some downfield speed on deep crossers.

    4. Kain Colter, Northwestern - Once again, I do not judge injuries, so Colter’s ankle surgery does not impact his week. The former quarterback’s transition to full-time receiver appeared to be smooth. Colter was making hands catches and keeping defenders off balance with stems in his routes.


    Tight Ends
    1. C.J. Fiedorowicz, Iowa - I have always been a big fan of Fiedorowicz, but I understand he will be limited. He was underused at Iowa and could shine on curl and out routes in the NFL. He has limited yards after catch ability and will make his name early on for his blocking consistency.

    2. Gator Hoskins, Marshall - Hoskins is an H-back in the NFL level and has a ceiling of Charles Clay. That is not a negative at all, but Hoskins will have to land with a team willing to use him. He will likely be asked to be a consistent lead blocker to offer versatility in order to stay on a roster, even if his foundation is as a pass catcher.

    3. Arthur Lynch, Georgia - Lynch appeared much more agile and mobile than I expected, but that might be due to practicing next to Marcel Jensen on the first day.


    Offensive Tackles
    1. Billy Turner, North Dakota State - Turner will get yelled out until he retires for poor technique, but his functional strength is excellent. That means Turner can win despite his poor technique in the same way Cordy Glenn has, except the latter is likely a better athlete. That does not mean Turner is a bad athlete, but he would be wise to drop his hips and bend at the knee to mirror and absorb more often. I would not be surprised if Turner ends up at guard because of that frustration.

    2. Jack Mewhort, Ohio State - Mewhort makes it obvious when he wins, which I love. He consistently attempts to obtain an inside latch to extend and control. That said, he does have a tendency to lose against speed rushers who gain a step off the snap.

    3. Seantrel Henderson, Miami - I had Henderson ranked higher prior to the week with the caveat that the event meant more to the tackle than anyone else. There were definitely some positive flashes, but Henderson seemed to plateau and failed to use his combination of athleticism and strength effectively. I still think Henderson can be successful if he lands with the right team, which is an underdiscussed part of the process.


    Interior Offensive Linemen
    1. Zack Martin, Notre Dame - Martin will likely be drafted as a tackle, and he will be a good one, but the Notre Dame product can be an outstanding interior lineman. This has nothing to do with arm length and more to do with a wide base. That width makes it difficult to mirror agile rushers who can weave between lanes.

    2. Brandon Thomas, Clemson - Thomas is another prospect who could play tackle, but I prefer him at guard. He has a very athletic lower half and good length. Don’t be surprised if Thomas is a second-round pick.

    3. Gabe Jackson, Miss State - The Bulldog is not a mauler like he was portrayed to be, but Jackson is consistent and sticks with his blocks in tight spaces. Expect a second- or third-round selection. Jackson could make an impact early in his career.

    4. Weston Richburg, Colorado State - One of the more notable surprises this week, Richburg has a chance to be the first true center selected in this class (not counting a prospect who play a different position in college). He is not overly quick or strong, but Richburg sustains his blocks in both the running game and pass protection.

    5. Jon Halapio, Florida - Another huge surprise this week. I have always noted Halapio’s natural strength, but he tended to overextend or lunge and get beat too often because of poor technique. This week he frequently displayed a stout base and balance. Halapio will likely be selected on the third day in May.


    Interior Defensive Linemen
    1a. Will Sutton, Arizona State - Weight is still a major part of the discussion when bringing up Sutton’s game. I still think it has been used as a bit of a crutch for critics, but his balance has been worse this season. After speaking with someone close to Sutton, the goal is for the defensive tackle to weigh in around 305 lbs at the Combine, which would be a drop of 10 lbs from this event. Add on the fact that Sutton is very aware of this criticism, and I am not worried in the least.

    On the field Sutton is a technician, with each of his movements having purpose. Wrist control to lift, steps to gain the balance or angle advantage. I doubt Sutton is selected in the first-round, but interior disruption is king. Sutton can over this.

    1b. Aaron Donald, Pittsburgh - Did I mention interior disruption is king? I do not care about Donald’s size (6’1/288), whoever, some NFL teams will. Maybe it is wrong for me to question the teams that do, since many of them have success, but if you are not selecting Donald because of measurement minimums it is a mistake. Donald utilizes a lateral hesitation step off the snap to get his opposition guessing. He then has an exceptional blend of hand and length use to drive through a blocker or quickness to work around them. His backfield vision is very good as well.

    3. Ra’Shede Hageman, Minnesota - Hageman’s career can be taken in two directions. I believe Hageman’s best position is as a 0 or 1 technique next to the center. Now, he does not fit the typical size of that position, so many might disagree. I expect Hageman to workout well at the Combine, so some teams will look at him as a 5 technique in an odd front. Hageman’s best trait right now his is natural strength, and couple with hand use and length he could make an impact in short distances to the QB.

    4. Caraun Reid, Princeton - It was nice to see Reid practice and play without multiple eyes and bodies assigned to him on each snap. He flashes hand use to create separation and can take advantage of the positional advantage. I would play him as a 3 technique, but he played from every alignment in school.

    4. Justin Ellis, Louisiana Tech - I was a big fan of Ellis prior to the Shrine Game, a big fan after, and once again remain intrigued by his skills. As previously stated, I think Ellis might do his best work as a 3 technique despite his NT size. He is an upfield disruptor, especially when extending his arms and keeping offensive linemen on skates. He did not do enough of that this week, however, preferring to rip under at the Senior Bowl. Do not typecast Ellis as a run defender stuck at the line of scrimmage.


    Edge Rushers
    1. Jeremiah Attaochu, Georgia Tech - Attaochu did not have a good week from a pass rushing standpoint, even in the limited number of reps he received. I would line up Attaochu in a wide 7 or 9 alignment early in his career and ask him to purely get in the backfield. I have read many opinions stating he should play stand up outside linebacker, and that could work, but I worry if too much responsibility means too much thinking and not enough action.

    2. Dee Ford, Auburn - Ford is a total stud. He has great bend and burst off the line, but Ford also displays hand use and length once his initial line is stopped. He was not forced to show that very often this week, but turn on his tape against Texas A&M to see it. Again, I don’t care about these distinctions between 4-3 and 3-4. There is not really a difference in many schemes. Line Ford up wide and let him run, bend and attack.

    3. Marcus Smith, Louisville - Smith is in the same boat as Attacohu. He was not asked to do very much this week, but at school Smith converted speed to power on a regular basis. Add on length and hand use, and Smith should wind up in the top 50.

    4. Kyle Van Noy, BYU - Van Noy can fit on the edge of four or three man lines and will surely stay in a two point stance. I trust him to drop into coverage a lot more than the rest of this list. He is a technically sound player who understands his responsibilities.

    5. Chris Smith, Arkansas - Smith had a great week, but I did not see it at Arkansas. He has good burst, whoever, he lacked hand use in school. I am not sold yet.


    Linebackers Off of the Line of Scrimmage
    1. Telvin Smith, Florida State - I want Telvin on my football team. I think there will be a pointless argument stating Smith could be converted to safety. He is a linebacker despite a 218 lbs frame. Smith understands how to use his length to take on blockers and has ridiculous speed to chase down plays. Besides, many teams are featuring light linebackers/heavy safeties in certain situations.

    2. Christian Kirksey, Iowa - Kirksey was my No. 20 Senior Bowler prior to the week. He played over top of corners and tight ends in the slot very frequently and also flashed some strong side linebacker ability at the line of scrimmage. I doubt Kirksey tests well, but he accomplishes his assignment and could be a third day pick to watch.

    3. Chris Borland, Wisconsin - I knew the Zach Thomas comparisons were coming. I love how Borland makes the most of his length when attacking blockers, but asking if he can obtain and sustain backfield vision from snap to snap is a worthwhile question.

    4. Jordan Zumwalt, UCLA - Zumwalt is a fiery player who can play multiple linebacker spots.


    Defensive Backs
    1. Jimmie Ward, Northern Illinois - Not only was Ward the best S at the event, he might be the best corner as well. I like his versatility to win over the slot, against tight ends, or in a traditional safety role. Ward has a good chance of being the third safety selected in May.

    2. Jaylen Watkins, Florida - Watkins was widely considered the fourth corner for the Gators this season, but he displayed good movement skills to mirror receivers and solid timing to disrupt at the catch point on multiple routes.

    3. Keith McGill, Utah - McGill is only a press man corner, but at Utah he was used in bail and off coverage looks. The NFL is obsessed with size at the position now.

    4. Pierre Desir, Lindenwood - Desir was my No. 2 Shrine Game participant before and after the week. He carried that performance over to this event, settling in to stick with receivers after slowing them down to his speed. Desir lacks catch up speed, but his length compensates for it.


    Top 25 Senior Bowlers Moving Forward:
    1a. DT Will Sutton, Arizona State


    1b. DT Aaron Donald, Pittsburgh


    3. DT Ra’Shede Hageman, Minnesota


    4. Edge rusher Jeremiah Attaochu, Georgia Tech


    5. Edge rusher Dee Ford, Auburn


    6. G Zack Martin, Notre Dame


    7. Edge rusher Marcus Smith, Louisville


    8. QB Derek Carr, Fresno State


    9. WR Jordan Matthews, Vanderbilt


    10. S Jimmie Ward, NIU


    11. OL Brandon Thomas, Clemson


    12. T Billy Turner, North Dakota State


    13. QB Jimmy Garoppolo, Eastern Illinois


    14. T Jack Mewhort, Ohio State


    15. LB Telvin Smith, FSU


    16. DT Caraun Reid, Princeton


    17. LB Christian Kirksey, Iowa


    18. G Gabe Jackson, Mississippi State


    19. Edge player Kyle Van Noy, BYU


    20. C Weston Richburg, Colorado State


    21. T Seantrel Henderson, Miami


    22. G Jon Halapio, Florida


    23. WR Robert Herron, Wyoming


    24. LB Chris Borland, Wisconsin


    25. DT Justin Ellis, Louisiana Tech

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    Re: The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

    2014 Senior Bowl: Auburn's Dee Ford headlines list of Risers-Fallers
    By Rob Rang | The Sports Xchange/CBSSports.com
    January 25, 2014 7:22 pm ET

    A year ago a relative unknown offensive tackle from Central Michigan began his climb towards the No. 1 overall selection in the 2013 NFL draft with a dominant performance at the Senior Bowl.

    With underclassmen expected to dominate this year's first round, no one from the 2014 Senior Bowl is going to match Eric Fisher's perch atop the draft. However, revealing performances during the all-important week of practice and the game, itself, is certain to impact NFL draft boards.

    Here are the 10 players who helped their NFL stock the most at the Senior Bowl, followed by five players who were unable to answer scouts' concerns during the Mobile, Ala. all-star game.

    Helped Themselves:

    Dee Ford, DE, Auburn: Ford impressed with a chiseled build at 6-foot-2, 243 pounds during the weigh-in and was virtually unstoppable off the edge during the practices, showing burst, bend and closing speed. He was the most dynamic player on the field during the game, recording two sacks and timing a leap to knock down a pass to earn MVP honors. Ford's dominant week boosted his stock at least a full round and could result in a top 32 selection.

    Aaron Donald, DT, Pittsburgh: It was Donald, not Ford, who earned most of the buzz early in the week, whipping interior offensive linemen with his quickness, tenacity and underrated strength. Like Ford, Donald's size (6-foot-1, 288 pounds) limits his fits in the NFL but his ability to pressure quarterbacks could earn him a first-round selection.

    Jimmie Ward, S, Northern Illinois: Scouts knew heading into the Senior Bowl that Ward possessed the fluidity and instincts to cover but competition in the MAC is much different than in Mobile. Athletic enough to handle deep coverage, as well as slide down to cover slot receivers, Ward was the Senior Bowl's most impressive pass defender this year.

    Crockett Gillmore, TE, Colorado State - Gilmore came in late to the Senior Bowl as an injury replacement, but the former defensive end impressed scouts immediately with his size and overall athleticism. He really caught fire during Thursday's practice, extending to haul in an impressive touchdown and continued his stellar play in the game itself.

    Weston Richburg, OC, Colorado State: Arkansas' Travis Swanson entered the week as the nation's top center prospect, but an impressive showing by another CSU Ram has his stock rising quickly. Richburg showed the anchor to handle powerful bull-rushers, as well as impressive agility in getting to the second level.

    Brandon Thomas, OL, Clemson: The unquestioned top offensive lineman in Mobile this week was Notre Dame's Zach Martin, who starred at left tackle for the Irish but projects better at guard due to his short arms. Thomas didn't earn nearly the media attention but also performed well at tackle despite a frame (6-foot-3 and a 1/2, 314 pounds) that suggests he too will be making the move inside in the NFL. Late in the game, Thomas was playing outside at tackle with Martin asked to move inside to guard.

    Caraun Reid, DT, Princeton: The well-built Ivy Leaguer proved with a competitive week of practice that he was every bit the talent as the more well-known prospects he was facing each snap. He capped off the week with sacks on back-to-back plays during the game, showing the lateral burst and closing speed to project nicely as a three-technique defensive tackle.

    Morgan Moses, OT, Virginia: At 6-foot-6, 325 pounds, Moses possesses the frame you'd expect of a dominating run blocker and he showed the ability to clear wide rushing lanes throughout the week. Moses boosted his stock this week, however, by providing reliable pass protection, demonstrating the arm length (34 3/4"), balance and surprising athleticism teams are looking for in a top-64 selection.

    Ryan Grant, WR, Tulane: At a rock-solid 6-foot-0, 197 pounds, Grant showed surprising burst, as well as the agility as a route-runner and reliable hands to out-play several more highly-touted pass catchers. A long touchdown during Wednesday's practice drew plenty of praise from scouts.

    Christian Kirksey, OLB, Iowa: The Big Ten remains one of college football's most consistent producers of pro-ready linebackers and Kirksey turned heads this week with his athleticism and instincts. A particularly impressive tackle early in the Senior Bowl game showed off his closing speed.

    Missed Opportunity:

    Tajh Boyd, QB, Clemson: Despite media reports to the contrary, Boyd's inaccuracy throughout the week of practice and game itself has his stock slipping. He possesses plenty of arm strength but was erratic, spraying the ball over the field. An ugly interception early in the Senior Bowl set the tone for a disappointing performance from the North Team's offense, as a whole.

    Cyril Richardson, OG, Baylor: At 6-foot-4, 344 pounds, Richardson is a massive interior presence, but he struggled with quicker defensive tackles throughout the week of practice (especially Donald) and wasn't nearly as powerful as a drive blocker as one might expect given his size.

    Jordan Matthews, WR, Vanderbilt: Matthews' production in the SEC speaks for itself, but he dropped a handful of passes throughout the week of practice. Even more alarming, he showed little in terms of burst or straight-line speed, struggling to gain separation from opposing cornerbacks.

    Will Sutton, DT, Arizona State: Sutton's quickness and power helped him record a tackle-for-loss early in the game, but in weighing in at a soft 315 pounds at under 6-foot-1 did him no favors with scouts. There is no question that the reigning Defensive Player of the Year possesses talent, but questions about his commitment towards reaching his full potential could push him deep into the draft's second day.

    Stephen Morris, QB, Miami: Morris earned the nickname "Tin Cup" from some scouts at the Senior Bowl due to his ability to make the amazing throw but struggles with the routine passes commonplace in every NFL offense. Morris boasts a strong arm and throws the deep ball with touch, but like the other two quarterbacks on the North squad (Boyd and Virginia Tech's Logan Thomas), he struggled with accuracy throughout the week.






    Norris: Senior Bowl Review
    Josh Norris
    All Star Circuit
    Saturday, January 25, 2014

    The purpose of Senior Bowl week is to supplement completed area-scout evaluations in practice and interviews. No evaluations are based on a single week’s performance, but certain prospects did help (or potentially hurt) their status and will force evaluators to take a second look at their live game action. I will breakdown each position below and rank participating performers accordingly. Please note, this is not strictly based on how these prospects did this week, instead it is based on their complete evaluation up to this point.

    For comparison, here is how I ranked the attendees prior to this week. Also, I was able to watch coaching practice tape for every 1 on 1 OL/DL drill and CB/WR drill this week, which allowed me to focus on specific prospects in these important matchups.

    The crew over at The Sideline View did a great job posting daily practice notes. Here are the entries from Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.

    Be sure to check out my top-25 Senior Bowlers exiting the event.

    Quarterbacks
    1. Derek Carr, Fresno State - Nothing changed this week regarding Carr’s evaluation, as his exposure to interior pressure is still limited. We know he has an arm to hit every level of the field despite throwing plenty of screens in college. Carr doesn’t always throw from a balanced base, but he has improved willingness to take a hit on release. His footwork can be a mess, though, and that will frustrate the fanbase where he lands, similarly to Jay Cutler or Matthew Stafford. Carr has a great arm and he knows it. Take a look at Greg Peshek’s QB Metrics.

    2. Jimmy Garoppolo, Eastern Illinois - Garoppolo entered this event as the No. 2 QB and he leaves as such. Many offenses rely on quick decision makers with a quick release, and Garoppolo can absolutely check these boxes. Things change a bit when pressured, as the quarterback has a tendency to drift laterally rather than step up or work from a phone booth. Garoppolo will end up in the crowded tier of passers after the top four, but do not be surprised if he tops that group. He displays mobility, touch, velocity, placement and a willingness to hit receivers at every level of the field.

    3. David Fales, San Jose State - Fales is a cerebral pocket mover, showing very little attention to bodies moving around him. He can be effective in tight spaces before taking a hit and has the footwork to bounce off of his back foot and create operational space if needed. Placement, touch, timing, and anticipation are all above average qualities. Those four skills can compensate for other deficiencies, specifically velocity.

    4. Logan Thomas, Virginia Tech - Thomas is not good, but his perceived upside likely places him over the other two passers on this list. Many times, Thomas looks great in terms of stature and pocket movement, and then he throws the football. Progression once reaching the NFL is discussed more than it actually happens, but Thomas will get a shot to be a team’s QB in waiting.

    5. Tajh Boyd, Clemson - I really like Boyd’s pocket movement and ability to throw from multiple arm angles. However, his placement is terrible and it has not improved. So many of his passes were touch throws that allowed WRs to win at the catch point. He tended to work to the check down without actually checking to see if it was available.

    6. Stephen Morris, Miami - I am not upset, I am just disappointed. Morris regressed this season rather than taking the jump many of us expected. He is undraftable. That might be a surprise coming from someone who was hyping up Morris before the season, but he is solely a vertical passer.

    Running Backs
    1. Charles Sims, West Virginia - Sims displayed a great combination of receiving ability and pass protection this week. Runners can show very little during the week due to the lack of opportunities to break first contact. Sims could be selected in the third-round.

    2. James White, Wisconsin - White is a compact back with a very thick lower half. He was given many of Wisconsin’s third down responsibilities, and that carried over into the week.

    3. Lorenzo Taliaferro, Coastal Carolina - This is all about pass protection. The Coastal Carolina product displayed toughness to absorb first contact and mirror on counter moves.


    Wide Receivers
    1. Jordan Matthews, Vanderbilt - I was surprised to see Matthews struggle against press coverage some this week. With that said, he did not hurt himself this week. I doubt Matthews is selected in the first-round. He is very technical in terms of balance, footwork, and wasted movement. His after catch ability seems to be underrated as well.

    2. Ryan Grant, Tulane - I know the Tulane product spent a great deal of time in the slot, but I project him to the outside. Grant does not shine in any one area. He finds soft areas in coverage and his first step off the line is difficult to slow down. Grant also understands stemming his opposition, forcing them to flip their hips which allows for the receiver to break off his route.

    3. Jared Abbrederis, Wisconsin - Despite exiting the week early due to a hamstring injury, Abbrederis did nothing to hurt his evaluation. Put on his game against Ohio State, specifically Bradley Roby, and you will see impressive adjustments once the ball is in the air along with great body control.

    4. Shaq Evans, UCLA - If only Evans could consistently catch the football. Check out this piece by Matt Waldman where he asked Evans and other receivers about the slight nuances of the position. Evans stood out.


    Slot Receiver
    1. Robert Herron, Wyoming - Herron is extremely slippery from the slot, and if the defensive back fails to get a hand on the receiver, he will only generate more separation. Herron did have a few drops earlier in the week, but this was not an issue at Wyoming.

    2. Jalen Saunders, Oklahoma - Saunders will get knocked by many due to his size (5’9/166). He wins in some very specific areas, however, specifically in space and as a returner. Saunders will struggle with physical coverage, as he might not be able to absorb it and continue on his route, but Saunders is quick enough to keep DBs moving.

    3. Michael Campanaro, Wake Forest - I do not judge injuries, so the fact that Campanaro missed multiple games while hurt does not impact my evaluation. He is a very quick player in the short to intermediate areas of the field but also shows off some downfield speed on deep crossers.

    4. Kain Colter, Northwestern - Once again, I do not judge injuries, so Colter’s ankle surgery does not impact his week. The former quarterback’s transition to full-time receiver appeared to be smooth. Colter was making hands catches and keeping defenders off balance with stems in his routes.


    Tight Ends
    1. C.J. Fiedorowicz, Iowa - I have always been a big fan of Fiedorowicz, but I understand he will be limited. He was underused at Iowa and could shine on curl and out routes in the NFL. He has limited yards after catch ability and will make his name early on for his blocking consistency.

    2. Gator Hoskins, Marshall - Hoskins is an H-back in the NFL level and has a ceiling of Charles Clay. That is not a negative at all, but Hoskins will have to land with a team willing to use him. He will likely be asked to be a consistent lead blocker to offer versatility in order to stay on a roster, even if his foundation is as a pass catcher.

    3. Arthur Lynch, Georgia - Lynch appeared much more agile and mobile than I expected, but that might be due to practicing next to Marcel Jensen on the first day.


    Offensive Tackles
    1. Billy Turner, North Dakota State - Turner will get yelled out until he retires for poor technique, but his functional strength is excellent. That means Turner can win despite his poor technique in the same way Cordy Glenn has, except the latter is likely a better athlete. That does not mean Turner is a bad athlete, but he would be wise to drop his hips and bend at the knee to mirror and absorb more often. I would not be surprised if Turner ends up at guard because of that frustration.

    2. Jack Mewhort, Ohio State - Mewhort makes it obvious when he wins, which I love. He consistently attempts to obtain an inside latch to extend and control. That said, he does have a tendency to lose against speed rushers who gain a step off the snap.

    3. Seantrel Henderson, Miami - I had Henderson ranked higher prior to the week with the caveat that the event meant more to the tackle than anyone else. There were definitely some positive flashes, but Henderson seemed to plateau and failed to use his combination of athleticism and strength effectively. I still think Henderson can be successful if he lands with the right team, which is an underdiscussed part of the process.


    Interior Offensive Linemen
    1. Zack Martin, Notre Dame - Martin will likely be drafted as a tackle, and he will be a good one, but the Notre Dame product can be an outstanding interior lineman. This has nothing to do with arm length and more to do with a wide base. That width makes it difficult to mirror agile rushers who can weave between lanes.

    2. Brandon Thomas, Clemson - Thomas is another prospect who could play tackle, but I prefer him at guard. He has a very athletic lower half and good length. Don’t be surprised if Thomas is a second-round pick.

    3. Gabe Jackson, Miss State - The Bulldog is not a mauler like he was portrayed to be, but Jackson is consistent and sticks with his blocks in tight spaces. Expect a second- or third-round selection. Jackson could make an impact early in his career.

    4. Weston Richburg, Colorado State - One of the more notable surprises this week, Richburg has a chance to be the first true center selected in this class (not counting a prospect who play a different position in college). He is not overly quick or strong, but Richburg sustains his blocks in both the running game and pass protection.

    5. Jon Halapio, Florida - Another huge surprise this week. I have always noted Halapio’s natural strength, but he tended to overextend or lunge and get beat too often because of poor technique. This week he frequently displayed a stout base and balance. Halapio will likely be selected on the third day in May.


    Interior Defensive Linemen
    1a. Will Sutton, Arizona State - Weight is still a major part of the discussion when bringing up Sutton’s game. I still think it has been used as a bit of a crutch for critics, but his balance has been worse this season. After speaking with someone close to Sutton, the goal is for the defensive tackle to weigh in around 305 lbs at the Combine, which would be a drop of 10 lbs from this event. Add on the fact that Sutton is very aware of this criticism, and I am not worried in the least.

    On the field Sutton is a technician, with each of his movements having purpose. Wrist control to lift, steps to gain the balance or angle advantage. I doubt Sutton is selected in the first-round, but interior disruption is king. Sutton can over this.

    1b. Aaron Donald, Pittsburgh - Did I mention interior disruption is king? I do not care about Donald’s size (6’1/288), whoever, some NFL teams will. Maybe it is wrong for me to question the teams that do, since many of them have success, but if you are not selecting Donald because of measurement minimums it is a mistake. Donald utilizes a lateral hesitation step off the snap to get his opposition guessing. He then has an exceptional blend of hand and length use to drive through a blocker or quickness to work around them. His backfield vision is very good as well.

    3. Ra’Shede Hageman, Minnesota - Hageman’s career can be taken in two directions. I believe Hageman’s best position is as a 0 or 1 technique next to the center. Now, he does not fit the typical size of that position, so many might disagree. I expect Hageman to workout well at the Combine, so some teams will look at him as a 5 technique in an odd front. Hageman’s best trait right now his is natural strength, and couple with hand use and length he could make an impact in short distances to the QB.

    4. Caraun Reid, Princeton - It was nice to see Reid practice and play without multiple eyes and bodies assigned to him on each snap. He flashes hand use to create separation and can take advantage of the positional advantage. I would play him as a 3 technique, but he played from every alignment in school.

    4. Justin Ellis, Louisiana Tech - I was a big fan of Ellis prior to the Shrine Game, a big fan after, and once again remain intrigued by his skills. As previously stated, I think Ellis might do his best work as a 3 technique despite his NT size. He is an upfield disruptor, especially when extending his arms and keeping offensive linemen on skates. He did not do enough of that this week, however, preferring to rip under at the Senior Bowl. Do not typecast Ellis as a run defender stuck at the line of scrimmage.


    Edge Rushers
    1. Jeremiah Attaochu, Georgia Tech - Attaochu did not have a good week from a pass rushing standpoint, even in the limited number of reps he received. I would line up Attaochu in a wide 7 or 9 alignment early in his career and ask him to purely get in the backfield. I have read many opinions stating he should play stand up outside linebacker, and that could work, but I worry if too much responsibility means too much thinking and not enough action.

    2. Dee Ford, Auburn - Ford is a total stud. He has great bend and burst off the line, but Ford also displays hand use and length once his initial line is stopped. He was not forced to show that very often this week, but turn on his tape against Texas A&M to see it. Again, I don’t care about these distinctions between 4-3 and 3-4. There is not really a difference in many schemes. Line Ford up wide and let him run, bend and attack.

    3. Marcus Smith, Louisville - Smith is in the same boat as Attacohu. He was not asked to do very much this week, but at school Smith converted speed to power on a regular basis. Add on length and hand use, and Smith should wind up in the top 50.

    4. Kyle Van Noy, BYU - Van Noy can fit on the edge of four or three man lines and will surely stay in a two point stance. I trust him to drop into coverage a lot more than the rest of this list. He is a technically sound player who understands his responsibilities.

    5. Chris Smith, Arkansas - Smith had a great week, but I did not see it at Arkansas. He has good burst, whoever, he lacked hand use in school. I am not sold yet.


    Linebackers Off of the Line of Scrimmage
    1. Telvin Smith, Florida State - I want Telvin on my football team. I think there will be a pointless argument stating Smith could be converted to safety. He is a linebacker despite a 218 lbs frame. Smith understands how to use his length to take on blockers and has ridiculous speed to chase down plays. Besides, many teams are featuring light linebackers/heavy safeties in certain situations.

    2. Christian Kirksey, Iowa - Kirksey was my No. 20 Senior Bowler prior to the week. He played over top of corners and tight ends in the slot very frequently and also flashed some strong side linebacker ability at the line of scrimmage. I doubt Kirksey tests well, but he accomplishes his assignment and could be a third day pick to watch.

    3. Chris Borland, Wisconsin - I knew the Zach Thomas comparisons were coming. I love how Borland makes the most of his length when attacking blockers, but asking if he can obtain and sustain backfield vision from snap to snap is a worthwhile question.

    4. Jordan Zumwalt, UCLA - Zumwalt is a fiery player who can play multiple linebacker spots.


    Defensive Backs
    1. Jimmie Ward, Northern Illinois - Not only was Ward the best S at the event, he might be the best corner as well. I like his versatility to win over the slot, against tight ends, or in a traditional safety role. Ward has a good chance of being the third safety selected in May.

    2. Jaylen Watkins, Florida - Watkins was widely considered the fourth corner for the Gators this season, but he displayed good movement skills to mirror receivers and solid timing to disrupt at the catch point on multiple routes.

    3. Keith McGill, Utah - McGill is only a press man corner, but at Utah he was used in bail and off coverage looks. The NFL is obsessed with size at the position now.

    4. Pierre Desir, Lindenwood - Desir was my No. 2 Shrine Game participant before and after the week. He carried that performance over to this event, settling in to stick with receivers after slowing them down to his speed. Desir lacks catch up speed, but his length compensates for it.


    Top 25 Senior Bowlers Moving Forward:
    1a. DT Will Sutton, Arizona State


    1b. DT Aaron Donald, Pittsburgh


    3. DT Ra’Shede Hageman, Minnesota


    4. Edge rusher Jeremiah Attaochu, Georgia Tech


    5. Edge rusher Dee Ford, Auburn


    6. G Zack Martin, Notre Dame


    7. Edge rusher Marcus Smith, Louisville


    8. QB Derek Carr, Fresno State


    9. WR Jordan Matthews, Vanderbilt


    10. S Jimmie Ward, NIU


    11. OL Brandon Thomas, Clemson


    12. T Billy Turner, North Dakota State


    13. QB Jimmy Garoppolo, Eastern Illinois


    14. T Jack Mewhort, Ohio State


    15. LB Telvin Smith, FSU


    16. DT Caraun Reid, Princeton


    17. LB Christian Kirksey, Iowa


    18. G Gabe Jackson, Mississippi State


    19. Edge player Kyle Van Noy, BYU


    20. C Weston Richburg, Colorado State


    21. T Seantrel Henderson, Miami


    22. G Jon Halapio, Florida


    23. WR Robert Herron, Wyoming


    24. LB Chris Borland, Wisconsin


    25. DT Justin Ellis, Louisiana Tech

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    Re: The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

    After Senior Bowl week, I've pretty much put Taj Boyd and Stephen Morris on my "10 foot pole" list.
    citr92 likes this.

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    Re: The Official 2014 Senior Bowl Thread

    do they let RS juniors in the senior bowl?

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