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  1. #16
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    Re: Anyone notice the Eerie silence of the International Community to Hurricane Katrina?

    It's not loading for me either.

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  2. #17
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    Re: Anyone notice the Eerie silence of the International Community to Hurricane Katrina?

    Venezuela offers fuel, food to hurricane-hit US
    Mon Aug 29, 7:48 PM ET

    Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez offered to send food and fuel to the United States after the powerful Hurricane Katrina pummeled the US south, ravaging US crude production.

    The leftist leader, a frequent critic of the United States and a target himself of US disapproval, said Venezuela could send aid workers with drinking water, food and fuel to US communities hit by the hurricane.

    "We place at the disposition of the people of the United States in the event of shortages -- we have drinking water, food, we can provide fuel," Chavez told reporters.

    Chavez said fuel could be sent to the United States via a Citgo refinery that has not been affected by the hurricane. Citgo is owned by Venezuela's state-owned oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA).

    In the Gulf of Mexico, which accounts for a quarter of total US oil output, 92 percent of crude and 83 percent of natural gas production were shut down due to Hurricane Katrina, which slammed Louisiana and Mississippi, according to US government data.

    Venezuela is the fourth-largest provider of oil to the United States, supplying some 1.5 million barrels a day.

    Last week, Chavez offered discount gasoline to poor Americans suffering from high oil prices and on Sunday offered free eye surgery for Americans without access to health care.
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    Re: Anyone notice the Eerie silence of the International Community to Hurricane Katrina?

    Katrina leaves 'enormous' devastation in U.S. south
    Wednesday, August 31, 2005 Updated at 1:29 AM EDT

    Associated Press and Canadian Press

    Gulfport, Miss. — Rescuers along the hurricane-ravaged Gulf Coast pushed aside the dead to reach the living Tuesday in a race against time and rising waters, while New Orleans sank deeper into crisis and Louisiana's Governor ordered storm refugees out of this drowning city.

    Two levees broke and sent water coursing into the streets of the Big Easy, a full day after New Orleans appeared to have escaped widespread destruction from hurricane Katrina. An estimated 80 per cent of the below-sea-level city was under water, up to six metres deep in places, with hundreds of homes swamped.

    "The situation is untenable," Governor Kathleen Blanco said. "It's just heartbreaking."

    One Mississippi county alone said its death toll was at least 100, and officials are "very, very worried that this is going to go a lot higher," said Joe Spraggins, civil defence director for Harrison County, home to Biloxi and Gulfport.

    Thirty of the victims in the county were from a beachfront apartment building that collapsed under an eight-metre wall of water as Katrina slammed the Gulf Coast with terrifying winds of 233 kilometres an hour Monday. And Louisiana officials said many were feared dead there, too, making Katrina one of the most punishing storms to hit the United States in decades.

    After touring the destruction by air, Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour said it looked like Hiroshima after the atomic bomb was dropped.

    New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin said hundreds, if not thousands, of people may still be stuck on roofs and in attics, and so rescue boats were bypassing the dead.

    "We're not even dealing with dead bodies," Mr. Nagin said. "They're just pushing them on the side."

    The flooding in New Orleans grew worse by the minute, prompting the evacuation of hotels and hospitals and an audacious plan to drop huge sandbags from helicopters to close up one of the breached levees. At the same time, looting broke out in some neighbourhoods, the city of 480,000 had no drinkable water, and the electricity could be out for weeks.

    With water rising perilously inside the Superdome, Ms. Blanco said the thousands of refugees now huddled there would be evacuated within two days. She said officials are working on a plan to get the people to other shelters.

    The dome, which became a shelter of last resort for some 20,000 people, is currently without electricity and has no air conditioning. Broken toilets have also made for extremely unsanitary conditions, Ms. Blanco said.

    "Conditions are degenerating rapidly," she said. "It's a very, very desperate situation."

    She asked residents to spend Wednesday in prayer.

    "That would be the best thing to calm our spirits and thank our Lord that we are survivors," she said. "Slowly, gradually, we will recover; we will survive; we will rebuild."

    A helicopter view of the devastation over the New Orleans area revealed people standing on black rooftops baking in the sunshine while waiting for rescue boats. A row of desperately needed ambulances were lined up on the interstate, water blocking their path. Roller coasters jutted out from the water at a Six Flags amusement park. Hundreds of inmates were seen standing on a highway because the prison had been flooded.

    Senator Mary Landrieu quietly traced the sign of the cross across her head and chest as she looked out at St. Bernard Parish, where only roofs peaked out from the water.

    "The whole parish is gone," Ms. Landrieu said.

    All day long, rescuers in boats and helicopters pulled out shellshocked and bedraggled flood refugees from rooftops and attics. The coast guard said it has rescued 1,200 people by boat and air, some placed shivering and wet into helicopter baskets. They were brought by the truckload into shelters, some in wheelchairs and some carrying babies, with stories of survival and of those who didn't make it.

    "Oh my God, it was hell," said Kioka Williams, who had to hack through the ceiling of the beauty shop where she worked as floodwaters rose in New Orleans' low-lying Ninth Ward. "We were screaming, hollering, flashing lights. It was complete chaos."

    Frank Mills was in a boarding house in the same neighbourhood when water started swirling up toward the ceiling and he fled to the roof. Two elderly residents never made it out, and a third was washed away trying to climb onto the roof.

    "He was kind of on the edge of the roof, catching his breath," Mr. Mills said. "Next thing I knew, he came floating past me."

    Across Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, more than one million residents remained without electricity, some without clean drinking water. An untold number who heeded evacuation orders were displaced and 40,000 were in Red Cross shelters, with officials saying it could be weeks, if not months, before most will be able to return.

    Emergency medical teams from across the country were sent into the region and U.S. President George W. Bush cut short his Texas vacation Tuesday to return to Washington to focus on the storm damage.

    Canada sent condolences to the victims and offered help.

    Deputy Prime Minister Anne McLellan said she told Michael Chertoff, the U.S. secretary of homeland security, that Canada was ready to provide assistance if needed.


    Federal Emergency Management Agency director Mike Brown warned that structural damage to homes, diseases from animal carcasses and chemicals in floodwaters made it unsafe for residents to come home any time soon. And a mass return also was discouraged to keep from interfering with rescue and recovery efforts.

    That was made tough enough by the vast expanse of floodwaters in coastal areas that took an eight-hour pounding from Katrina's howling winds and up to 40 centimetres of rainfall. From the air, neighbourhood after neighbourhood looked like nothing but islands of rooftops surrounded by swirling, tea-coloured water.

    In New Orleans, the flooding actually got worse Tuesday. Failed pumps and levees apparently spilled water from Lake Pontchartrain into streets. The rising water forced hotels to evacuate, led a hospital to boatlift patients to emergency shelters, and drove the staff of New Orleans' Times-Picayune newspaper out of its offices.

    Officials late Tuesday began the process of using helicopters to drop 3,000-pound sandbags and dozens of giant concrete barriers into the breach. Major General Don Riley of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said officials were also looking for a barge to plug the hole.

    General Riley said it could take close to a month to get all the flood water out of the city. If the water rises a couple feet higher, it could also wipe out the water system for whole city, said New Orleans' homeland security chief Terry Ebbert.

    In devastated Biloxi, Miss., areas that were not underwater were littered with tree trunks, downed power lines and chunks of broken concrete. Some buildings were flattened.

    The string of floating barge casinos crucial to the coastal economy were a shambles. At least three of them were picked up by the storm surge and carried inland, their barnacle-covered hulls sitting up to 200 metres inland.

    The deadliest spot yet appeared to be Biloxi's Quiet Water Beach apartments, where authorities said about 30 people were washed away. All that was left of the red-brick building was a concrete slab.

    "We grabbed a lady and pulled her out the window and then we swam with the current," 55-year-old Joy Schovest said through tears. "It was terrifying. You should have seen the cars floating around us. We had to push them away when we were trying to swim."

    Said Biloxi Mayor A.J. Holloway: "This is our tsunami."

    Looting became a problem in both Biloxi and in New Orleans, in some cases in full view of police and national guardsmen. One police officer was shot in the head by a looter in New Orleans, but was expected to recover, Sgt. Paul Accardo, a police spokesman.

    On New Orleans' Canal Street, which actually resembled a canal, dozens of looters ripped open the steel gates on clothing and jewellery stores, some packing plastic garbage cans with loot to float down the street. One man, who had about 10 pairs of jeans draped over his left arm, was asked if he was salvaging things from his store.

    "No," the man shouted, "that's EVERYBODY'S store!"

    Looters at a Wal-Mart brazenly loaded up shopping carts with items including microwaves, coolers and knife sets. Others walked out of a sporting goods store on Canal Street with armfuls of shoes and football jerseys.

    Outside the broken shells of Biloxi's casinos, people picked through slot machines to see if they still contained coins and ransacked other businesses. "People are just casually walking in and filling up garbage bags and walking off like they're Santa Claus," said Marty Desai, owner of a Super 8 motel.

    Insurance experts estimated the storm will result in up to $25-billion (U.S.) in insured losses. That means Katrina could prove more costly than record-setting hurricane Andrew in 1992, which caused an inflation-adjusted $21-billion in losses.

    Oil prices jumped by more than $3 a barrel Tuesday, climbing above $70 a barrel, amid uncertainty about the extent of the damage to the Gulf region's refineries and drilling platforms.

    By midday Tuesday, Katrina was downgraded to a tropical depression, with winds around 55 km/h. It was moving northeast through Tennessee at around 35 km/h, with the potential to dump 20 centimetres of rain and spin off deadly tornadoes.

    In Canada, forecasters warned of heavy rain and potential flooding as the weather system was expected to sweep into southern Ontario by early Wednesday.

    Katrina left 11 people dead in its soggy jog across South Florida last week, as a much weaker storm.
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  4. #19
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    Re: Anyone notice the Eerie silence of the International Community to Hurricane Katrina?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ferter
    Maybe the USA has become the big brother, but I'm not certain that all of the citizens in this country wish to be in that role?

    And at what cost?

    We don't have the money either. We have budget deficits and a national debt that will be passed on to many generations.

    I am not opposed to helping other countries, but I think we should take care of our own country first.
    I think we are overstepping our big brother role. The cost is rising, in dollars, and lives.

    This may be the right time to pull back and take care of the our own country.
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  5. #20
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    Re: Anyone notice the Eerie silence of the International Community to Hurricane Katrina?

    Quote Originally Posted by UtterBlitz
    I think we are overstepping our big brother role. The cost is rising, in dollars, and lives.

    This may be the right time to pull back and take care of the our own country.
    And leave the world's largest oil supply in the hands of the terrorists? Thanks, but no thanks.
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  6. #21
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    Re: Anyone notice the Eerie silence of the International Community to Hurricane Katrina?

    From what I hear, outside aid from nations criticizing us has been getting TURNED DOWN. I could be wrong on this, but Chavez was told, "Thanks, but no thanks. We're America, we can take care of our own."

    There was also an offer from the Dutch to send a large Engineer group to help fix the levee system, with the same result. I am almost willing to bet GOOD money that this is the reason for the apparent silence. Once we turn our noses up at the offer, others see it and turn their backs.
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  7. #22
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    Re: Anyone notice the Eerie silence of the International Community to Hurricane Katrina?

    Quote Originally Posted by MOM
    From what I hear, outside aid from nations criticizing us has been getting TURNED DOWN. I could be wrong on this, but Chavez was told, "Thanks, but no thanks. We're America, we can take care of our own."

    There was also an offer from the Dutch to send a large Engineer group to help fix the levee system, with the same result. I am almost willing to bet GOOD money that this is the reason for the apparent silence. Once we turn our noses up at the offer, others see it and turn their backs.
    Mom, I'd be interested to read that. Have you got a link to it?
    "Before the gates of excellence the high gods have placed sweat; long is the road thereto and rough and steep at first; but when the heights are reached, then there is ease, though grievously hard in the winning." --- Hesiod

  8. #23
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    France looking to help thru the Caribbean

    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,168129,00.html

    France May Mobilize Relief From Caribbean
    Thursday, September 01, 2005

    NEW ORLEANS French humanitarian aid officials met on Thursday to examine ways of providing support for victims of Hurricane Katrina (search) in the United States, a French Foreign Ministry spokesman said. France is considering ways of mobilizing relief teams from the French Antilles (search) in the Caribbean, ministry spokesman Denis Simonneau said at a news conference.

    "France expresses its readiness to bring this aid based on the needs American authorities express," he said. French authorities were following Katrina's aftermath "with particular attention," he added.

    Authorities set up a telephone hotline in France for people to obtain information about relatives or friends who may be missing in the hurricane-ravaged region, Simonneau said.

    It was not immediately clear how many French citizens might have been in the region when the hurricane hit.

    A day earlier, French President Jacques Chirac (search) sent a message of solidarity to U.S. President George W. Bush, saying France was standing by the victims of the hurricane.

  9. #24
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    Re: Anyone notice the Eerie silence of the International Community to Hurricane Katrina?

    Quote Originally Posted by UtterBlitz
    It is a shame that so many of our National Guard are out of the country helping others at this time of need for the US.
    :bored:
    Actually, we just sent a bunch today from Missouri down there. They mobilized and deployed within 24 hours and most of them have already done two tours since 9/11. It just takes a day or two for them to leave their jobs, pack and drive down there. Nine out of ten Guard members are not active or full time, like I am, so it takes time for them to mobilize and get on scene.

    What I hate is hearing the press make this politcal by saying where is the military (mobilizing!)? Where's FEMA (organizing!)? Where are the police (all over and possibly checking on their own family!)?

    Everyone thought that this might be bad, but not as bad as it has become. No one predicted that levees would break or that it would be this devastating. This was also poor planning by the local / state governments in the effected areas. Help is on the way, it just takes time.

    My heart goes out to the victims and those awaiting our help. I know that it is hard to say just wait when it has already been days without assistance, but it is on the way. As for the looters, hell raisers and thugs...well, we got something for them too.

    As for the rest of the world, we can and should take care of our won. I do not like how the Muslim press has jumped on this or how leftist jerks like Chavez use this as an opportunity to stick it to the prez or us as a people; he did offer cheap oil but only after he gave his opinion on a variety of issues. Future reference to other countries: Don't come calling for help if you never even picked up the phone and offered help or condolences. Just my opinion....
    Last edited by SFCRamFan; -09-01-2005 at 11:31 PM.
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    Re: Anyone notice the Eerie silence of the International Community to Hurricane Katrina?

    SFCRamfan....I know that help is on the way, but I also know that there is a critical time period which can claim many lives. That time is already here. The lives will be lost and the people stranded will feel abandoned and the people on the outside will feel helpless.

    I feel helpless now. I want to drive down and pick some people up or deliver supplies, but I know I can't get there without clear roads. I can't do much but give money and feel bad.

    I am frustrated to know that so many of our national guard are overseas protecting other people and we are unprepared to deal with our own problems. Personally I don't think that the National Guard should be fighting in wars and protecting people outside this country, but that is my opinion and I am certain my opinion means nothing to our President and to the government.
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  11. #26
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    Re: Anyone notice the Eerie silence of the International Community to Hurricane Katrina?

    Quote Originally Posted by SFCRamFan
    No one predicted that levees would break or that it would be this devastating.
    I don't want to start a giant political argument, but the Bush administration has been underfunding southeast Louisiana projects of this nature for years. Frankly, no one should have been surprised when the levees broke as they did - they haven't gotten the federal funding to ensure their strength.
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  12. #27
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    Re: Anyone notice the Eerie silence of the International Community to Hurricane Katrina?

    What makes me mad is seeing hungry people on the overpasses, no protection from the elements, no food or water, and the government is not dropping supplies. It almost seems like the government is testing the "survival of the fittest" theory in LA. I also heard that bush was making a speech about medicare on Wednesday....shouldn't he be focusing his efforts on hurricane relief and finding a way to get our troops home without causing a bigger war?
    On a good note....a state department spokesman has stated that the US will begin allowing help from 20 nations including Honduras (very poor nation), Russia, China, Japan, France, and Germany.

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    Re: Anyone notice the Eerie silence of the International Community to Hurricane Katrina?

    As with all of us, the news of the suffering has me deeply grieved. The news of the crime in the midst of such a terrible disaster (apart from stealing food and water) has me scratching my head in unbeilief and boiling with indignation. But the whole situation also brings up a big question for me, and that is, couldn't 90% of this problem, at least the suffering by those who are still stuck in the city, been avoided?

    I read all the way down here in Chile that there was concern that the levees would break, and that was before the hurricane arrived. I read that this has been a concern for years in New Orleans, that one direct hit by a huricane and they were probably going to fail. Is it the fed govenment's fault that it occurred? Is it the city's fault that it occurred? Everyone is involved at this point is finger-pointing to place the blame elsewhere (typical politics). Let's face it, a lot of leaders, elected and given the responsibility to avoid the types of problems that we now see going on, just dropped the ball. The possibility of a hurricane hitting New Orleans has always been there. Noone wanted to do anything to prepare for it.

    One other thing that really has me scratching my head: The governor of the State ordered mandatory evacuation of the city! To me, that means everyone out except those who are physically unable to get out and those who need to remain to help the physically unable. Why the heck are so many people still in the city? Could it be that if everyone capable of obeying this order had done so, much of the chaos we now see in the city could have been avoided?

    Maybe I'm out in left field, but I just don't get it.

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    Re: Anyone notice the Eerie silence of the International Community to Hurricane Katrina?

    Well Chile, I'll try to help. Economics played a major role in the Levees which in hindsight was wrong. The U.S. has only been hit 3 times by a Category 5 Hurricane, and category 4 Hurricanes aren't that common either. Mainly category 3, which the levees were built for. Guess they should have built them to withstand category 5 but they didn't.

    Yes, the Governor ordered an evacuation of the whole city but New Orleans has a big problem which is similar to other big cities in the U.S. but in New Orleans more so, the poor probably couldn't get out. For one reason or another, they just couldn't or wouldn't for that matter.

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    Re: Anyone notice the Eerie silence of the International Community to Hurricane Katrina?

    Europe to send oil aid to U.S. By Caroline Jacobs
    23 minutes ago

    PARIS (Reuters) - Europe will dip into its emergency reserves of gasoline to help the United States through an energy crisis that began when Hurricane Katrina smashed into Gulf coast refiners, EU governments said on Friday.

    Spain and Germany said they were ready and able to send fuel across the Atlantic in an operation coordinated by the West's energy watchdog, the International Energy Agency. The United States confirmed it had requested assistance.

    EU nations have watched in horror as the world's richest country struggles with the aftermath of Katrina. Thousands are feared dead and troops in the flooded city of New Orleans have been told to shoot-to-kill to crack down on looting.

    Gasoline prices have soared by nearly a fifth over the past week and President George W. Bush has urged Americans to go easy on fuel. Unlike the IEA, the United States has only emergency reserves of crude and a small stockpile of heating oil.

    "It's self-evident that we support the American bid," German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder told a news conference in Berlin.

    He expected a massive two million barrels per day of oil to be shipped over the next month -- more or less offsetting lost output from the Gulf coast's battered refineries.

    "We assume that would lead to there being sufficient energy reserves in the market and, second, we would wish the pressure on the prices of oil products to be lessened," Schroeder said.

    Speaking at a meeting of EU foreign ministers in Wales, EU foreign policy chief Javier Solana said: "Whatever the United States asks for they will be given."

    IEA TO MAKE FORMAL REQUEST FOR OIL

    A Spanish official told Reuters the IEA had contacted Madrid on Thursday and indicated there would be a formal request for oil on Friday. Spain wanted a "balanced proposal" involving all IEA members - 26 industrialized nations including Japan.

    "We are waiting (for the IEA request) and I think we will tell them 'yes'," a spokesman at Spain's Industry Ministry said.

    Crude oil prices have hit levels unseen in real terms since 1980 - the year of the Iran- Iraq war and a year after the Iranian revolution that choked off supply lines.

    Prices fell by $1.07 a barrel to $68.40 on Friday on news that Europe was riding to the aid of the United States. Gasoline also eased.

    But European oil will take at least 10 days to reach U.S. shores and tanker space is in short supply with many commercial ships already under charter and crossing the Atlantic.

    The Paris-based IEA declined to confirm it would release oil to the United States. "We're still consulting with all our members and the damage assessment is still going on," an IEA spokeswoman said on Friday.

    EU members Germany, France, Spain and Italy have substantial emergency reserves. The IEA last dipped into its emergency reserves in 1991 when a U.S.-led coalition ejected Iraqi troops from Kuwait. The agency, created after the 1973-74 oil crisis to protect consumers, must hold stocks of 90 days of net imports.

    (Additional reporting by Juan Navarro and Emma Ross-Thomas in Madrid, Dave Graham in Berlin and Pieter Nielsen in Brussels)
    I post this as an acknowledgement, with all the other posts above of course, that the silence has been broken. Now if we could only quiet the chaos.

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