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  1. #16
    talkstoangels61's Avatar
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    Re: Got my report card today

    That's good 16 but, a pretty woman will brighten up any man's day!.............That also means pretty inside!


  2. #17
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    Re: Got my report card today

    Get a Rich one that can retire you when your Ramsfan18
    My heart beats crazy and my blood runs wild

  3. #18
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    Re: Got my report card today

    lol nice psycho. I'll take any pretty women I can get as long as she is nice and I love her.
    RamsFan16

  4. #19
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    Re: Got my report card today

    From a former high school & university teacher....
    Gym: B (He gives everyone except serverly inactive lazy people then they got C's)
    This just means you can get through a game of kickball without taking a D-Lew to the marbles. Don't sweat it.
    Contemporary Issues: C
    I'm betting the knowledge most valuable in this class will be the ability to cull bias and spin from real information. Your teacher is human and as such will lean either to the liberal or conservative side, therefore having a certain take on each of these issues. Make sure you gain an understanding of facts vs. opinions. You can pick that up around here pretty quick too.......for example, this is all my opinion.
    Computer Applications: B
    If you excel at computers, you will rule the world. Just ask Bill Gates.
    Energy & Enivromental Sciece: B
    Science makes the world go round.....quite literally.
    English 3: C+
    Whether it's fair or not, people will judge you by your mastery of the English language......that too, you will see around here.
    Accounting 1: A
    Everyone needs at least a year of Accounting. This doesn't mean you have to be a CPA or anything, but knowing the financial aspects of business gives you power regardless of what career you take.
    American History: D
    Don't be doomed to repeat it.
    Math: C
    Math is a level of higher thinking. And higher thinking will set you apart from the rest of the world.

    RF16, the worst thing you can do at this point is to set your standards too low. Whatever it is you want to do, understand that at 16 you have the potential to do it......unless you want to be an Olympic gymnast, that ship has already sailed.
    "Before the gates of excellence the high gods have placed sweat; long is the road thereto and rough and steep at first; but when the heights are reached, then there is ease, though grievously hard in the winning." --- Hesiod

  5. #20
    thoey's Avatar
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    Re: Got my report card today

    Quote Originally Posted by HUbison
    This just means you can get through a game of kickball without taking a D-Lew to the marbles. Don't sweat it.
    And a new standard phrase has been created.

    :tongue:
    This space for rent...

  6. #21
    HUbison's Avatar
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    Re: Got my report card today

    Quote Originally Posted by thoey
    And a new standard phrase has been created.

    :tongue:
    I was hoping you would like it. It's quite versatile. For example, "Man, Zygmunt is really D-Lewing Martz, isn't he?" or " 'Hey, did you hear Lisa caught her husband w/ another woman?' 'What'd she do?' 'She D-Lewed him and walked out!' "

    Hopefully, it will catch on. I kinda like it.
    "Before the gates of excellence the high gods have placed sweat; long is the road thereto and rough and steep at first; but when the heights are reached, then there is ease, though grievously hard in the winning." --- Hesiod

  7. #22
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    Re: Got my report card today

    An A in accounting and a D in history....well, at least you are paying attention in one class....lol

    Seriously, spend some extra time on history this quarter and just a little less time here and see what happens.

  8. #23
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    Re: Got my report card today

    Think of what your grades would have been without ClanRam.

  9. #24
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    Re: Got my report card today

    Quote Originally Posted by AvengerRam
    Think of what your grades would have been without ClanRam.
    Not any better.
    RamsFan16

  10. #25
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    Re: Got my report card today

    16, if you are satisfied that you tried your best and are happy with those grades, then congrats. Every person is different, and better at different things.

    For myself when I was your age, when I got grades like that it was because I was thinking about other things besides school (GIRLS!). I am seeing the same with my son. A little attitude adjustment was given to me then and to my son now. (No, I am not necessarily talking about a spanking).
    This space for rent...

  11. #26
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    Re: Got my report card today

    16-
    I applaud your courage for even showing your grades online where bunches of hacks could whack away at you. I'll have to say that you have a brass pair. I wish that we had the INTERNET when I was your age. Heck, we used "8 inch FLOPPY Disks" back in my day.

    My stepson (31) has to work two jobs to make ends meet. He has very little time for quality of life.

    My tip to you: Take a foreign language; bring up that Math; create short & long range goals/plans for your success, and update them. Establish yourself first, and then you can hand pick the hot chicks later.

    "It's easy to be hard; it's hard to be smart."

    :clanram:

  12. #27
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    Re: Got my report card today

    Quote Originally Posted by LDJOHN55
    16-
    I applaud your courage for even showing your grades online where bunches of hacks could whack away at you. I'll have to say that you have a brass pair. I wish that we had the INTERNET when I was your age. Heck, we used "8 inch FLOPPY Disks" back in my day.

    My stepson (31) has to work two jobs to make ends meet. He has very little time for quality of life.

    My tip to you: Take a foreign language; bring up that Math; create short & long range goals/plans for your success, and update them. Establish yourself first, and then you can hand pick the hot chicks later.

    "It's easy to be hard; it's hard to be smart."

    :clanram:
    That last quote confused me. And my freshman year I took spanish lol. I didn't like it. We have germen exchange students and they told us some naught german sayings lol
    RamsFan16

  13. #28
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    Re: Starting your education all over again ...

    Doesn't ask me why I bother but here's some free advice - this is what the german exchange students should have brought with them - understand it and all else will fall into place:
    ______________________________________________

    Communicative rationality is a set of theories which try to explain human rationality as necessary outcomes of successful communication. In particular, they are tied to the philosophy of Jürgen Habermas and his program of Universal pragmatics, along with its subtheories, discourse ethics, and rational reconstruction.

    According to these theories, the potential for rationality is inherent in communication itself. Along this argument, Habermas has formulated a notion of communicative rationality which takes up this implicit potential and formalizes it into an explicit knowledge. The goal is to transform implicit know-how into explicit know-that. In this case, the phenomenon that needs explaining are the intuitively mastered rules for reaching an understanding and conducting argumentation possessed by subjects capable of speech and action. The result is a complex conception of reason that Habermas sees as doing justice to the most important trends in twentieth century philosophy, while escaping relativism and providing standards for critical evaluation (Habermas, 1992).

    There are number of specific trends that Habermas identifies as important to twentieth century philosophy and to which he thinks his conception of communicative rationality contributes. Looking at these will give a clear outline of what Habermas understands communicative rationality to be. He labels all these trends as being post-metaphysical. They can be listed as such (Cooke, 1994). These post-metaphysical philosophical movements have called into question the substantive conceptions of rationality (e.g., “a rational person thinks this”) and put forward procedural or formal conceptions instead (e.g., “a rational person thinks like this”);
    with regard to valid knowledge and how it may be achieved, they have replaced foundationalism with fallibilism; they have cast doubt on the idea that reason should be conceived abstractly beyond history and the complexities of social life, and have contextualized or situated reason in actual historical practices;
    as part of this contextualization of reason they have replaced a focus on individual structures of consciousness with a concern for pragmatic structures of language and action; and as part of this orientation toward practice and away from theory they have given up philosophy's traditional fixation on theoretical truth and the representational functions of language to the extent that they also recognize the moral and expressive functions of language.

    Habermas's conception of communicative rationality moves along with these contemporary currents of philosophy.

    Concerning 1) it can be said that: Communicative rationality refers primarily to the use of knowledge in language and action rather than to a property of knowledge. One might say that it refers primarily to a mode of dealing with validity claims and that it is, in general, not a property of these claims themselves. Furthermore…this perspective suggests no more than formal specifications of possible forms of life… it does not extend to the concrete form of life…(Cooke, 1994).

    Concerning 2) Habermas clearly and explicitly understands communicative rationality according to the terms of a reconstructive science. This means that the conception of communicative rationality is not a definitive and final rendering of what reason is, but rather a fallible but rigorously substantiated claim or hypothesis. It also means that communicative rationality itself is a procedural and falliblistic ideal of rationality. It can prescribe only formal specifications concerning what qualifies as reasonable (not concrete exemplars to be emulated) and even those formal specifications are taken as fallible, being open to revision in light of experience and learning.

    Concerning 3) and 4) it should be noted that Habermas's entire conceptual framework is focused around social interaction and communication. He ties rationality to the validity basis of everyday speech, which contextualizes reason in the everyday practices of modern individuals. This is opposed to those philosophies (e.g. Plato, Kant etc.) that sought to ground reason in an intelligible and non-temporal realm, understanding this reason as being able to judge the realm of time and contingency because it was outside it.

    However, it should also be noted that while Habermas's notion of communicative rationality is contextualized and historicized, it is not relativistic. Many philosophical contextualists take reason to be entirely context dependent and relative. Habermas holds reason to be relatively context specific and sensitive. The difference is that Habermas explicates the deep structures of reason by examining the presuppositions and validity dimensions of everyday communication, while the relativists focus only on the content displayed in various concrete standards of rationality. Thus, Habermas can compare and contrast the rationality of various forms of society with an eye to the deeper and more universal processes at work, which enables him to justify the critique of certain forms (i.e., that Nazism is irrational and bad) and lend support to the championing of others (i.e., democracy is rational and good). The relativists on the other hand, can compare and contrast the rationality of various forms of society but are unable to take up a critical stance, because they can posit no standard of rationality outside the relative and variable content of the societies in question (Nazism is morally equivalent to democracy because the standards for both are relative).

    Concerning 5) Habermas's communicative rationality emphasizes the equal importance of the three validity dimensions, which means it sees the potential for rationality in normative rightness (WE), theoretical truth (IT) and expressive or subjective truthfulness (I). The differentiation of these three “worlds” is understood as a valuable heuristic. This leaves each to its specific forms of argumentation and justification. However, these validity dimensions should be related to one another and understood as complementary pieces in a broader conception of rationality. This points towards a productive interpenetration of the validity dimensions, for example the use of moral insights by the sciences without their having to sacrifice theoretical rigor, or the inclusion of psychological data into resources of moral philosophy.

    These last points concerning the breadth of communicative rationality have by far the most important implications. By differentiating the three validity dimensions and holding them as equally valuable and rational, a broader and multifaceted conception of rationality is opened. What this means is that Habermas has, through the formal pragmatic analysis of communication, revealed that rationality should not be limited to the consideration and resolution of objective concerns. He claims that the structure of communication itself demonstrates that normative and evaluative concerns can (and ought to) be resolved through rational procedures.

    The clearest way to see this is to recognize that the validity dimensions implicit in communication signify that a speaker is open to the charge of being irrational if they place normative validity claims outside of rational discourse. Following Habermas the argument relies that the following are given:

    (a) that communication can proceed between two individuals only on the basis of a consensus (usually implicit) regarding the validity claims raised by the speech acts they exchange;

    (b) that these validity claims concern at least three dimension of validity (I, truthfulness; WE, rightness; IT, truth); and

    (c) that a mutual understanding is maintained on the basis of the shared presupposition that any validity claim agreed upon could be justified, if necessary, by making recourse to good reasons.

    From these premises it is concluded that any individual engaging in communication is accountable for the normative validity of the claims they raise. By earnestly offering a speech act to another in communication, a speaker claims not only that what they say is true (IT) but also that it is normatively right (WE) and honest (I). Moreover, the speaker implicitly offers to justify these claims if challenged and justify them with reasons. Thus, if a speaker, when challenged, can offer no acceptable reasons for the normative framework they implied through the offering of a given speech act, that speech act would be unacceptable because it is irrational.

    In its essence the idea of communicative rationality draws upon the implicit validity claims that are inescapably bound to the everyday practices of individuals capable of speech and action. A mutual understanding can be achieved through communication only by fusing the perspectives of individuals, which requires they reach an agreement (even if it is only assumed) on the validity of the speech acts being shared. Moreover, the speech acts shared between individuals in communication are laden with three different types of validity claims, all of which quietly but insistently demand to be justified with good reasons. Communicative rationality appears in the intuitive competencies of communicative actors who would not feel that a mutual understanding had been achieved if the validity claims raised were unjustifiable. Thus, the simple process of reaching an understanding with others impels individuals to be accountable for what they say and to be able to justify the validity claims they raise concerning normative (WE), evaluative (I) and objective matters (IT).

    Of course a very important issue arises from this, which is that what constitutes a good or acceptable justification varies from context to context. Even if it is accepted that rationality must be expanded to include normative and evaluative dimensions it is not clear what it is that makes a speech act justified, because it is unclear what constitutes a good reason.

    Before tackling what constitutes a good reason it must be understood that there are different kinds of reasons in relation to the different validity dimensions. This should have been becoming apparent, because what defines a validity dimension are the procedures of justification that are unique to it. For example, if one claims or implies with their speech act that it is raining outside, a good reason for claiming this is that one saw it out the window. If this were called into question, the claim would be vindicated by looking out the window. This is a very simple way of describing the procedures of justification unique to objective validity claims. However, if one claims or implies with their speech acts that abortion is acceptable in certain cases my reasons for claiming this must be of a different nature. The speaker would have to direct the attention of the listener to certain features of the social world that are infused with meaning and significance. The speaker would have to draw on insights into the vulnerability of individuals under the weight of life's circumstances and the kinds of rights that humans deserve. These types of considerations make up the resources available for the justification of normative validity claims.

    What constitutes a good reason is a more complex problem. Accepting the distinction between the different kinds of reasons that accompany the differentiation of the validity dimensions does not give any insight into what a good reason in a particular validity dimension would be. In fact, it complexifies the issue because it makes it clear that there are different procedures unique to each validity dimension and that these dimensions cannot be reduced to one another. Habermas does suggest some general guidelines concerning the rationality of communicative processes that lead to conclusions (see Universal pragmatics). But his explanations regarding the specific procedures that are unique to each validity dimension are much more elaborate."
    _______________________________________________

  14. #29
    RamsFan16's Avatar
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    Re: Got my report card today

    Thanks. But did you type all of that up?
    RamsFan16

  15. #30
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    Re: Got my report card today

    Quote Originally Posted by RamsFan16
    Thanks. But did you type all of that up?
    Nah, he cut and paste that out of a book. You don't really imagine A2 actually sits around thinking about that stuff, do you? But then again, nothing from A2 surprises anymore.
    "Before the gates of excellence the high gods have placed sweat; long is the road thereto and rough and steep at first; but when the heights are reached, then there is ease, though grievously hard in the winning." --- Hesiod

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