ClanRam Wall of Fame

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1997
 

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1997 - Robert Stanton "Bob" Waterfield - UCLA


Robert Stanton "Bob" Waterfield
(July 26, 1920 – March 25, 1983) was an American football player, a hall of fame quarterback in the National Football League.

His rookie year in professional football was in 1945 and he started immediately. Waterfield was taken in quickly by fans, becoming the first ever rookie to win the league’s Most Valuable Player and unanimous All-NFL choice. He ended the season with a win in the NFL Championship game, where he threw touchdown passes of 37 and 44 yards as the Rams beat the Washington Redskins 15-14. After the season, he signed a three-year contract for $20,000 per year, which made him the highest-paid player in pro football.

In 1946, the Rams moved to Los Angeles, California, where Waterfield became the star on the West Coast's first major professional franchise. He would later split time at quarterback with Norm Van Brocklin, who joined the team as a rookie in 1949. Behind this duo, Los Angeles played in three straight title games, 1949-1951. Runners-up in the first two, the Rams regained the league title in the 1951 championship game with a 24-17 win over the Cleveland Browns. It was the Rams' only league title during their 49 seasons in southern California (1946–94).

In a 1948 regular season game, the Rams were behind the to-be-champion Philadelphia Eagles 28-0. Waterfield managed to rally the team for a tie on four late touchdown passes. In the 1950 divisional playoffs, he was unable to practice due to a severe flu he had endured. However, he came off the bench anyway and threw three touchdown passes in a 24-14 win over the Chicago Bears.

In his first four seasons, he also played defense and intercepted a career total of 20 passes. As a place kicker, he had 315 successful PATs and 60 field goals, and as a punter, had a 42.4 yard average.

While an accomplished kicker and punter, Waterfield was best known for his ability to throw the deep ball. He led the NFL in passing in the 1946 and 1951 seasons, and ended his eight-year career with 814 completions, 11,849 yards and 97 touchdowns.

He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame with the third class in 1965.

After an extended illness, Waterfield died of respiratory failure on March 25, 1983, at the age of 62. He had been in the intensive care unit at St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank for two weeks prior to his death.

 

Passing
Rushing
Year
Team
G
Att.
Comp.
Pct.
Yds.
TD
Int.
Rating
No.
Yds.
Avg.
TD
1945 Cleveland Rams
10
171
89
52.0
1609
14
17
72.4
18
18
1.0
5
1946 Los Angeles Rams
11
251
127
50.6
1747
17
17
67.6
16
-60
-3.8
1
1947 Los Angeles Rams
12
221
96
43.4
1210
8
18
39.2
3
6
2.0
1
1948 Los Angeles Rams
11
180
87
48.3
1354
14
18
60.0
7
12
1.7
0
1949 Los Angeles Rams
12
296
154
52.0
2168
17
24
61.3
5
-4
-0.8
1
1950 Los Angeles Rams
12
213
122
57.3
1540
11
13
71.7
8
14
1.8
1
1951 Los Angeles Rams
11
176
88
50.0
1566
13
10
81.8
9
49
5.4
3
1952 Los Angeles Rams
12
109
51
46.8
655
3
11
35.7
9
-14
-1.6
1
Career Total
91
1617
814
50.3
11849
97
128
61.6
75
21
0.3
13
Kicking
Punting
Year
Team
G
FG
FGA
XK
XKA
Pts
No.
Yds.
Avg.
1945 Cleveland Rams
10
1
3
31
34
64
39
1585
40.6
1946 Los Angeles Rams
11
6
9
37
37
61
39
1743
44.7
1947 Los Angeles Rams
12
7
16
27
30
54
59
2500
42.4
1948 Los Angeles Rams
11
6
11
38
44
56
43
1833
42.6
1949 Los Angeles Rams
12
9
16
43
45
76
49
2177
44.4
1950 Los Angeles Rams
12
7
14
54
58
81
52
2087
40.1
1951 Los Angeles Rams
11
13
23
41
43
98
4
166
41.5
1952 Los Angeles Rams
12
11
18
44
45
83
30
1276
42.5
Career Total 91
60
110
315
336
573
315
13367
42.4
Additional Career Statistics: Receiving: 3-19; Punt Returns" 4-48; Interceptions: 20-228

 

 
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1998

 

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1998 - Lawrence McCutcheon - Colorado State University

 

Lawrence McCutcheon was selected in the third Round of the 1972 NFL Draft by the Rams out of Colorado State University. He appeared in 89 games for the Rams, appearing in seven playoff games including Super Bowl XIV. In 1975 McCutcheon established a Postseason record by rushing for 202 yards on 37 carries in the playoff game against the St. Louis Cardinals.

McCutcheon led the Rams in rushing for 5 consecutive seasons from 1973–1977 and was named to the Pro Bowl each year. During his tenure with the Rams, McCutcheon gained a total of 6,186 yards on 1,425 carries. In addition to his 5 consecutive Pro Bowl appearances, McCutcheon was named Second-team All-Pro in 1974, All-NFC in 1977 & Second-team All-NFC in 1973, 1975 & 1976.

In the 1980 Super Bowl, McCutcheon threw a 24-yard touchdown pass to Ron Smith, giving the Rams a 19-17 lead over the powerful Pittsburgh Steelers. However the Rams would eventually lose the game, 31-19.

McCutcheon was promoted to director of player personnel of the Rams in May 2003. He's spent 38 years with the Rams

 

RUSHING
Year Team - Rushing Games Att Att/G Yds Avg Yds/G TD Long
1979 Los Angeles Rams 11 73 6.6 243 3.3 22.1 0 21
1978 Los Angeles Rams 8 118 14.8 420 3.6 52.5 0 18
1977 Los Angeles Rams 14 294 21.0 1,238 4.2 88.4 7 48
1976 Los Angeles Rams 14 291 20.8 1,168 4.0 83.4 9 40
1975 Los Angeles Rams 13 213 16.4 911 4.3 70.1 2 43T
1974 Los Angeles Rams 14 236 16.9 1,109 4.7 79.2 3 --
1973 Los Angeles Rams 12 210 17.5 1,097 5.2 91.4 2 --
1972 Los Angeles Rams 3 -- 0.0 -- -- -- -- --
TOTAL 109 1,521 14.0 6,578 4.3 60.3 26 48
Receiving
Year Team - Receiving Games Rec Yds Avg Yds/G Long TD
1979 Los Angeles Rams 11 19 101 5.3 9.2 11 0
1978 Los Angeles Rams 8 12 76 6.3 9.5 33 2
1977 Los Angeles Rams 14 25 274 11.0 19.6 30 2
1976 Los Angeles Rams 14 28 305 10.9 21.8 42 2
1975 Los Angeles Rams 13 31 230 7.4 17.7 24 1
1974 Los Angeles Rams 14 39 408 10.5 29.1 -- 2
1973 Los Angeles Rams 12 30 289 9.6 24.1 -- 3
1972 Los Angeles Rams 3 -- -- -- 0.0 -- --
TOTAL 109 198 1,799 9.1 16.5 42 13
Kick Returns
Year Team Games Ret Yds Lng Avg TD 20+ 40+ FC Fum
1979 Los Angeles Rams 11 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
1978 Los Angeles Rams 8 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
1977 Los Angeles Rams 14 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
1976 Los Angeles Rams 14 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
1975 Los Angeles Rams 13 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
1974 Los Angeles Rams 14 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
1973 Los Angeles Rams 12 1 6 6.0 -- 0 -- -- 0 --
1972 Los Angeles Rams 3 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
TOTAL 109 1 6 6.0 0 0 0 0 0 0

 

 

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1999
 

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1999 - Jack Thomas Snow - University of Notre Dame

Jack Snow. The Minnesota Vikings selected Snow in the first round (he was the number 8 pick overall) in the 1965 NFL Draft but shortly traded him to the Rams.
Snow broke into the Rams's starting lineup in his rookie 1965 season and remained there. In 1967 he averaged a career-high 26.3 yards per reception and scored eight touchdowns on his 28 receptions.
He was named to the West squad in the NFL Pro Bowl, but did not appear in the game.
Snow gained a reputation for catching the long pass--in that era's vernacular, "the bomb"--from quarterback Roman Gabriel. Perhaps his best seasons were 1969, when he and Gabriel, that year's NFL MVP, combined for 49 catches, and 1970, when his 51 receptions totaled 859 yards and seven touchdowns, earning him as an honorable mention place on the Associated Press's All-NFC team.

Snow remained the Rams's starter at split end until 1974-1975, when he divided time with fellow receivers Lance Rentzel, Harold Jackson, and Ron Jessie.
He finished his professional career with 340 receptions and 45 touchdowns; his 6012 career receiving yards ranked 30th in NFL history.

He returned to the Rams as a receivers coach in 1982 under Ray Malavasi.

In 1992 he joined Los Angeles sports-talk radio station KMPC (now KSPN} as an analyst for Rams radio broadcasts and a daily program host.

He followed the team to St. Louis in 1995, and was one of a handful of old L.A. Rams still employed by the Rams in the 2005 season, 11 years after their departure from southern California.

Snow developed a staph infection in November 2005 and died at age 62 as a result of complications arising from the infection. He is buried at All Souls Cemetery in Long Beach, California.


 
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2000
 

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2000 - Merlin Jay Olsen - Utah State University

Merlin Olsen. Coming out of college, Olsen had offers from both Los Angeles of the NFL and the Denver Broncos of the rival American Football League. He chose the security of the NFL and signed with the Rams. Olsen's first contract was for around $50,000 for two years, plus a signing bonus. It was 1962, and the average football player salary at the time was around $12,000 a year. He was the first USU Aggie to be drafted in the 1st round of the NFL draft.

Olsen played professionally (from 1962 to 1976) for the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League. A leading defensive star of his era, he missed only two games in his 15-season NFL career. He was named the NFL's Rookie of the Year in 1962 and was First-team All-Pro in 1964, and 1966 through 1970. He was voted Second-team All-Pro in 1965, 1973 and 1974.

Olsen almost ended up on offense, but was later moved to the defensive line after a few experiments in practice. Soon he became part of one of the best front fours in NFL history. Deacon Jones, Rosey Grier, and Lamar Lundy joined Olsen on the defensive line in 1963 that was nicknamed "The Fearsome Foursome". He was named the AP NFL Defensive Player of the Week for week 12 in 1965. Olsen scored his first touchdown in that game.

Throughout the 1960s, this quartet terrorized opposing offenses. Olsen's play helped the Rams to the playoffs in 1967 and 1969. He was voted the club's Outstanding Defensive Lineman from 1967–70 by the Los Angeles Rams Alumni. In week 14, 1967, Olsen and the rest of the Fearsome Foursome were named the AP NFL Defensive Players of the Week for their performance against the Baltimore Colts. In the 1970s, Olsen continued his dominant play at defensive tackle and his eleven sacks in 1972 were second on the team. After week 8 in 1972, Olsen was named the Associated Press NFL Defensive Player of the Week for the third time in his career.

The Rams won the NFC West crown in 1973 through 1976 thanks in part to the play of Olsen. They ranked first in the NFL in run defense in 1973 and 1974 and finished second in sacking opposing passers both years. In 1973 Olsen was voted the NFLPA NFC Defensive Lineman of the Year and the next season, 1974, he was the recipient of Bert Bell Award as the NFL MVP as voted by the Maxwell Club. Olsen accepted the award "on behalf of all who toil in the NFL trenches".

 

 
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2001
 

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2001 - Thomas Jesse Fears - UCLA

 

Thomas Jesse Fears (December 3, 1922 – January 4, 2000) was a Mexican-American football wide receiver for the Los Angeles Rams in the National Football League, playing nine seasons from 1948 to 1956.

Fears was the first player in NFL history to line up on the line of scrimmage, away from the tackle, thus making him the first wide receiver in NFL history. Selected as a defensive back by the Rams, Fears quickly made his mark as a wide receiver in 1948, while also displaying his versatility by playing on defense and at tight end. During his first three seasons at the professional level, he led all NFL receivers in catches, and broke the league's single-season record with 77 catches in 1949.

The record would be short-lived as he increased that mark to 84 during the 1950 NFL season, including a then-record 18 catches in one game against the Green Bay Packers on November 12. He also helped the team advance to the NFL title game with a trio of touchdown receptions in the divisional playoff against the Chicago Bears, winning All-Pro accolades for the second consecutive year.

During the ensuing offseason, Fears became embroiled in a contract dispute with the team for the second straight year. The year before, he hinted at leaving the team to work for General Motors Corporation, then announced on March 13, 1951 that he was retiring to work for a local liquor distributor. Neither threat materialized, and despite offers from four Canadian Football League teams, Fears signed for $13,000.

That season, Fears played in only seven games, but helped lead the Rams to their third straight championship game appearance. After two disappointments, the franchise captured its first NFL title since moving to the West Coast, with Fears an integral part of the title game victory when he caught the winning score. His 73-yard touchdown reception midway through the fourth quarter broke a 17-17 deadlock with the Cleveland Browns.

After bouncing back in 1952 with 48 receptions for 600 yards and six scores, the beginning of the end of his career began after he fractured two vertabrae in an October 18, 1953 game against the Detroit Lions. Limited to just 23 receptions that year, he would average 40 catches the next two years, but after a preseason injury in 1956, he hauled in only five passes and retired on November 6. For the remainder of that campaign, he served as an assistant coach, finishing his playing days with 400 catches for 5,397 yards and 38 touchdowns.

 

 
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2002

 

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2002 - Richard Robert "Rich" Saul - Michigan State University


 

After playing the role of reserve lineman from 1970 to 1974,
Saul replaced Ken Iman as the starting center (American football) with the Rams in 1975. That year, the Rams beat the St. Louis Cardinals in the divisional round of the 1975-76 NFL playoffs, rushing for 237 yards. However, the team lost to the Dallas Cowboys in the NFC championship game. In 1976, the Rams beat the Cowboys in the divisional round of the 1976-77 NFL playoffs, rushing for 120 yards. But they lost the NFC championship game to the Minnesota Vikings, and, the following year, lost the divisional round of the 1977-78 NFL playoffs to the same team. They finally beat the Vikings in the 1978-79 NFL playoffs. However, they lost again to the Cowboys in the NFC championship game. In the 1979-80 NFL playoffs the Rams defeated the Cowboys and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers to win the NFC title, rushing for 159 and 216 yards, respectively. But they had a more difficult time running against the Pittsburgh Steelers, only 107 yards, losing Super Bowl XIV. In the 1980-81 NFL playoffs, the Rams lost to the Cowboys again, this time in a wild card game.
In Saul's final year, 1981, the Rams deteriorated to a won-lost record of 6-10, his final game being a 30-7 loss to the Washington Redskins.

Saul was selected to six Pro Bowls (1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981) during his career.

Saul died on April 15, 2012, at the age of 64 after having suffered with leukemia for nine years.

 
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2003
 

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2003 - Jack "Hacksaw" Reynolds - University of Tennessee

Jack "Hacksaw" Reynolds is a former American football player who played for the University of Tennessee, and started out as a fullback and changed to linebacker. He was a first-round draft pick by the Los Angeles Rams in the 1970 NFL Draft and played there 11 years.

Reynolds earned his nickname in 1969 by cutting an abandoned 1953 Chevrolet Bel Air (some accounts claim it was a Porsche) in half with a hacksaw after his previously unbeaten University of Tennessee team returned from an embarrassing 38-0 road loss to Ole Miss. "I came back to school and I was very upset," Reynolds said. "I had to do something to relieve my frustration." He decided to turn the abandoned car into a trailer for his newly purchased Jeep. After working through the night on the project, chewing through 13 hacksaw blades, he returned the next day with some teammates to show off his handiwork. However, when they arrived, both halves of the car were gone. For the remainder of his career, the nickname stuck.

 

 
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2004

 

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2004 - Nolan Cromwell - University of Kansas Jayhawks

 

Nolan Cromwell. He was drafted by the Los Angeles Rams as a defensive back in the second round, pick 32, in 1977 and played his entire 11-year career in Los Angeles. He was the Rams nickelback in 1977 and 1978 and a standount on special teams, running a fake field goal as a holder was Cromwell's specialty. In 1979 he secured the starting free safety position and was named Second-team All-NFC.

He was named the 1980 NFC Defensive Player of the Year by UPI and by the Kansas Committee of 101, and was named by Football Digest as the NFL Defensive Back of the Year in 1980, 1981, 1982, and 1983. He was selected to play in four consecutive Pro Bowls, from 1980–1983. Cromwell was part of the Rams defenses that performed well in the late-1970s as well as the Top 10 defenses of 1985 and 1986 when Rams qualified for the playoffs five of his last six seasons.

At the time of his retirement, he was the Rams' all-time leader in interception return yardage with 671 yards in 37 interceptions. After retirement, he was named to the NFL 1980s All-Decade Team and the Orange County Sports Hall of Fame.

Along with his various accomplishments on the field, Cromwell also starred in the 1986 Rams promotional video "Ram It," rapping "I like to ram it, as you can see, nobody likes ramming it more than me. "

 
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2005
 

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2005 - Leroy Irvin - University of Kansas Jayhawks

 

Leroy Irvin was a member of the Los Angeles Rams from 1980 to 1989. He played cornerback. He played in the Pro Bowl in 1985 and 1986. He currently holds the record for most punt return yards in a single game (207) against the Atlanta Falcons in 1981. Irvin is one of only a few players in NFL history to be named all-pro at two positions. Irvin was born in Fort Dix, NJ and attended high school at Glenn Hills High School in Augusta, Georgia. He began his college career in 1976 at the University of Kansas.

For his career, Irvin made two pro bowl appearances (1985,1986) and was named all-pro four seasons (1981, '82, '85 and '86). He currently works with former Los Angeles Rams teammate Vince Ferragamo at End Zone Mortgage in Anaheim Hills, CA. He most recently started a company alongside former Los Angeles Rams teammate Eric Dickerson called Original Mini Jerseys. The company holds an NFL license and offers a unique sports memorbilia product. He appeared in the 1985 team promotional video "Ram It", where he called himself the "Iceman" and stated that interceptions were his game.

 
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2006
 

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2006 - Henry Ellard - Fresno State University

Henry Ellard was drafted in the second round (32nd overall) of the 1983 NFL Draft by the Los Angeles Rams. In the NFL, Ellard was known for using his height and jumping ability to get to high passes, his leadership, and his superior skills as a route runner. Respected commentators like Deion Sanders, and John Madden have stated he is one of the best ever. In his eleven seasons with Los Angeles he went to three Pro Bowls. At the time of his retirement,

Ellard held the Rams' team records for career receptions (593), receiving yards (9,761), 100-yard games (26), punt return average (11.3), and total offense (11,663).

 

Year Team Rec Yards Av Long TD
1983 Los Angeles Rams 16 268 16.8 44 0
1984 Los Angeles Rams 34 622 18.3 63t 6
1985 Los Angeles Rams 54 811 15.0 64t 5
1986 Los Angeles Rams 34 447 13.1 34t 4
1987 Los Angeles Rams 51 799 15.7 81t 3
1988 Los Angeles Rams 86 1,414 16.4 68 10
1989 Los Angeles Rams 70 1,382 19.7 53 8
1990 Los Angeles Rams 76 1,294 17.0 50t 4
1991 Los Angeles Rams 64 1,052 16.4 38 3
1992 Los Angeles Rams 47 727 15.5 33t 3
1993 Los Angeles Rams 61 945 15.5 54 2

 

 

 
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2007
 

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2007 - Eric Demetric Dickerson - Southern Methodist University

Eric Demetric Dickerson (born September 2, 1960) is a former American college and professional football player who was a running back in the National Football League (NFL) for eleven seasons during the 1980s and 1990s.

1983–1987: L.A. Rams era

While he considered going to the Los Angeles Express in the United States Football League, Dickerson decided to go into the National Football League. He was selected second overall in the 1983 NFL Draft by the Los Angeles Rams. An immediate success, he established rookie records for most rushing attempts (390), most rushing yards gained (1,808) and most touchdowns rushing (18), including another two receiving touchdowns. His efforts earned him All-Pro, Pro Bowl, Player of the Year and Rookie of the Year honors.

In his second season, Dickerson continued his onslaught on the NFL record book becoming a member of the 2000 rushing yards club. Twelve times in 1984 he gained more than 100 yards rushing, breaking the record of 100-yard games in a season held by O.J. Simpson. His 2,105 total yards rushing beat Simpson’s 1973 NFL season record of 2,003 yards (Dickerson having reached 2,007 yards after 15 games), but since the NFL expanded the regular season from 14 to 16 games in 1978, Dickerson had the benefit of playing in two additional games. No one has since rushed for more yards in a single NFL season. Dickerson's 5.6 yards per carry led the Rams to a playoff berth in 1984.

 

Year Team Games Attempts Yards YPC Long TDs
1983 Los Angeles Rams 16 390 1,808 4.6 85 18
1984 Los Angeles Rams 16 379 2,105 5.6 66 14
1985 Los Angeles Rams 14 292 1,234 4.2 43 12
1986 Los Angeles Rams 16 404 1,821 4.5 42 11
1987 Los Angeles Rams 3 60 277 4.6 57 1

 

 
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2008
 

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2008 - Jackie Slater - Jackson State University

 

Jackie Slater played in 259 games from 1976 to 1995, a then-record for offensive lineman (broken by Bruce Matthews in the 1999 season). He was the first player to play 20 seasons for one team, and former Washington Redskins cornerback Darrell Green is the only other one to accomplish the feat. Much like Ed "Too Tall" Jones was with the Dallas Cowboys, Slater was unique in "bridging gaps" with different eras in the franchise. Slater was teammates with Merlin Olsen and Jack Youngblood earlier in his career and Jerome Bettis and Isaac Bruce at the end of his career, although Bettis would be traded to the Pittsburgh Steelers (where he had more success) right after Slater retired.

Although used primarily as a backup and special teams player during his first three seasons, Slater became a starter in 1979 and that season the Rams went to Super Bowl XIV. In 1980 he was a part of an offensive line that surrendered just 29 sacks and helped the Rams’ offense finish second in the NFL in total yards gained with 6,006. In 1983, he and the Rams offensive line demonstrated their versatility when they allowed a league-low 23 sacks while also paving the way for Dickerson’s rookie rushing record of 1,808 yards. He appeared in the 1985 team promotional video "Ram It" as "Big Bad Jackie". He started the lead verse, where he admitted that although the team could not sing or dance well, they would do their best for the city.

In 2001, Slater was enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was voted the National Football League Players Association NFC Offensive Lineman of the year four times—1983, 1986, 1987, and 1989. Slater was the Athletes in Action/Bart Starr Award winner after the 1995 season.

 

 
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2009
 

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2009 - David (Deacon) Jones - South Carolina State University

 

David (Deacon) Jones was drafted in the fourteenth round of the 1961 NFL Draft by the Los Angeles Rams. He then earned a starting role as a defensive end and teamed with tackle Merlin Olsen to give Los Angeles a perennial All-Pro left side of the defensive line. He became a part of the Fearsome Foursome defensive line of the Rams (along with Lamar Lundy, Rosey Grier, and Olsen), which is now considered one of the best lines of all time. Jones won consensus All-Pro honors five straight years from 1965 through 1969 and was Second-team All-Pro in 1964, 1970, and 1972. He was also in seven straight Pro Bowls, from 1964 to 1970, and was selected to an eighth after the 1972 season with the San Diego Chargers. He was voted the team's Outstanding Defensive Lineman by the Los Angeles Rams Alumni in 1962, 64, 65, and 66. In 1971 Jones suffered a severely sprained arch, which caused him to miss four starts and he ended the season with 4½ sacks, his career-low to that point.

Jones was considered by many to revolutionize the position of defensive end. Jones was noted for coining the term "sack." What separated Jones from every other defensive end was his blinding speed and his ability to make tackles from sideline to sideline, which was unheard of in his time. He also was the first pass rusher to utilize the head slap, a move that he said "To give myself an initial headstart on the pass rush, in other words a extra step. Because anytime you go upside a man's head ... or a woman; they may have a tendency to blink they eyes or close they eyes. And that's all I needed."

Pro Football Weekly reported he accumulated 194½ sacks over his career, which would be third on the all-time sack list. (Jones would have ranked first all-time at the time of his retirement, and since has been surpassed by two fellow Hall of Famer's Bruce Smith and Reggie White.)

In 1967, Jones had 26 sacks in only 14 games, which (if official) would be the single season record. (The term "sack" had not yet been coined at the time, and official sack statistics were not recorded by the NFL until 1982.) Then in 1968 Jones had 24 sacks in 14 games, also more than the current NFL record. The sum total of these two seasons would give him 50 sacks in 2 seasons, far more than anyone else has achieved.



Unofficial Annual Sack Totals

Year
Sacks
1961
8
1962
12
1963
20
1964
22
1965
19
1966
18
1967
26
1968
24
1969
15
1970
12
1971
4.5

 

 
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2010
 

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2010 - Jack Youngblood - University of Florida

Youngblood was drafted by the Los Angeles Rams in the first round of the 1971 NFL Draft. He was the 20th overall pick in that draft and signed a 3-year $105,000 contract including a $30,000 signing bonus.[19] That season he backed up Deacon Jones at left defensive end and started four games when Jones was sidelined with a severely sprained arch. He was named All-Rookie by Football Digest and after the season Jones was traded to the San Diego Chargers. In 1972 the left defensive end position was Youngblood's as he led the Rams defensive linemen in tackles with 70, and started 11 of the 14 games he played, recording six sacks.

In 1973 Youngblood was a Second-team All-pro selection and went to the first of his seven Pro Bowls and led the Rams with 16½ sacks. The Ram defense led the NFL in fewest yards allowed and fewest rushing yards. He was voted the Rams defensive lineman of the year by the Rams Alumni Association. Beginning in the 1973 season, the Rams added the unrelated Jim Youngblood to its roster, so from that time on, both Youngbloods had the unique distinction of having their entire name on the back of their jerseys, the given name appearing above the family name. The following year, 1974, the Rams again led the NFL in rushing defense and Youngblood led the Rams with 15 sacks while being voted a consensus First-team All-Pro. The Rams advanced to the NFC Championship game, losing 14-10 to the Minnesota Vikings.

Youngblood was honored as the NFC Defensive Player of the Year by United Press International in 1975 and Pro Football Weekly named Youngblood the NFL defensive lineman of the year. For the third consecutive season Youngblood led the Rams in sacks (15) and was a consensus All-pro again, repeating his 1974 honor. In a December, 1975, 35-23 playoff win over the St. Louis Cardinals, Youngblood pass-rushed Cardinals offensive lineman Dan Dierdorf, penetrated into the backfield, then tipped and intercepted a pass by Jim Hart, returning the interception 47 yards for a touchdown. Later in the game, Youngblood forced a fumble that was recovered by teammate Fred Dryer, blocked an extra point attempt, and sacked Hart to stop a Cardinals drive.

Youngblood repeated his NFC Defensive Player of the Year Award in 1976 while co-leading the Rams in sacks with 14½ and being a consensus First-team All-pro for the third straight season. The following year, 1977, Youngblood was voted to his fifth consecutive Pro Bowl and a consensus All-NFC selection and Second-team All-pro while leading the Rams in sacks for the fifth straight season. In 1978 the Rams led the NFL in total defense and Youngblood was a consensus First-team All-Pro for the fourth time in five years.

One of the athletic feats for which Youngblood is best known, is that of playing the entire 1979 playoffs, including Super Bowl XIV, with a fractured left fibula. He also played in the 1980 Pro Bowl with the injured leg, a week after the Super Bowl. In the playoffs, Youngblood sacked Dallas Cowboys quarterback Roger Staubach near the sideline in the waning moments of the divisional playoff game versus the Cowboys. Playing with the fractured leg was noted by Sports Illustrated in their Top 10 list of athletes playing in pain. For that and other achievements Jack was dubbed the “John Wayne of football” by Jim Hanifan and echoed by Hall of Fame coach John Madden. The NFL Network series NFL Top 10 selected Youngblood's performance in the 1979 playoffs as top on its list of the “Gutsiest Performances″ of all-time.

For the 1979 season Youngblood had a career-high 18 sacks and was a consensus First-team All-pro for the fifth time. He was voted to his seventh consecutive Pro Bowl. In 1980 he was Second-team All-pro and First-team All-NFC while leading the Rams with 11½ sacks. In 1981 Jack led the Rams with 12½ sacks and was the Rams outstanding defensive lineman. In the off-season, prior to the 1981 season, Jack had emergency surgery to remove a hot-dog sized blood clot from under his left arm. It was a result of repeated trauma to a nerve in his arm that blocked the flow of blood. Despite the broken leg and numerous other injuries, Youngblood played in 201 consecutive games, a Rams team record; and only missed 1 game in his 14-year NFL career. He played in seven straight Pro Bowls, 5 NFC Championships, and one Super Bowl. He was also the Rams defensive captain from 1977 through 1984 and was voted the Dan Reeves award 3 times, which is awarded to the team's MVP. He had 151½ career sacks and led the Rams in sacks nine times despite playing first in assistant Coach Ray Malavasi's stop-the-run-first defensive scheme and then in his final two seasons in Defensive Coordinator Fritz Shurmur's 3-4 two-gap scheme which limited some pass rush opportunities to make sure the opponent's running game was handled.

Youngblood faced a challenge in 1983 when the Rams adopted Shurmur's 3-4 defense. Critics thought Youngblood might be too small to play that position, yet he performed in it well (recording 10½ sacks in 1983 and 9½ sacks in 1984 while Rams were among the NFL's best defenses at stopping the run) despite being considered undersized. Among the standout games in Youngblood's final two seasons were the opening game of the 1983 season, against the New York Giants in which Youngblood recorded two sacks; and the 1983 season finale against the New Orleans Saints. In the Saints game Youngblood recorded 10 tackles, two sacks, recorded a safety and was named the NFL Defensive Player of the Year by Pro Football Weekly for the effort. In Week 5 of 1984 against the New York Giants, Youngblood recorded two sacks, drew three holding calls and was named NFC Defensive Player of the Week by the NFL.Then, in Week 10, against the St. Louis Cardinals, Jack dominated the game sacking Neil Lomax three times and drawing three holding calls, and blocking a potential game-tying field goal on the game's final play to preserve a 16-13 Rams win.

His streak of consecutive games played ended in Week 15 of the 1984 season, when Youngblood had to sit out his first football game since being a collegiate player in 1970. He had suffered a ruptured disc in his lower back two weeks earlier. Despite the injury, he returned for the season finale against the 49ers and the playoffs. He attributed his ability to play to a series of back adjustments that allowed him more freedom of movement, even though team doctors told Youngblood he was out for the season and needed surgery. He was voted the Rams' recipient of the 1984 Ed Block Courage Award by “representing everything that is positive about professional football and serving as an inspiration in their locker rooms being a positive role model in his communities”.

Youngblood at the Hall of Fame Gold Jacket Dinner, 2001.
When Youngblood retired on August 27, 1985, he asked his career to be remembered for “dignity, integrity, respect and pride″.

After retiring as a player in 1985, Youngblood worked in the Rams' front office until 1991.

 

 
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2011 - Marshall William Faulk - San Diego State University

 

Marshall William Faulk (born February 26, 1973) is a former American college and professional football player who was a running back in the National Football League (NFL) for twelve seasons.

Indianapolis Colts (1994–1998)

Faulk was traded to the St. Louis Rams the following season due to problems he referred to as "misunderstandings."[citation needed] Faulk had missed practices and was considered holding out for a new contract. Colts president Bill Polian did not want his young team's chemistry damaged, so he traded Faulk for second- and fifth-round picks in the upcoming draft (used to draft LB Mike Peterson and DE Brad Scioli). The Colts moved on at the position, drafting Edgerrin James in the first round. Faulk held out for twelve days as the details of his contract were worked out. On August 4, 1999, Faulk signed a seven-year, $45.2 million contract with the Rams, which was the biggest deal in team history‎ at the time. In it Faulk was guaranteed $9.6 million including a $7-million signing bonus. The problem in negotiations was the proposed fifth year, in which Faulk would get $7 million in salary and a $5-million roster bonus. The deal was structured to prevent Faulk from ever being tagged a transition or franchise player.

In his first year in St. Louis, Faulk was the catalyst for "The Greatest Show on Turf", a nickname given to coordinator Mike Martz's aggressive Coryell-style offense. In this offense he put up some of the best all-purpose numbers in the history of the NFL. Faulk's patience and diligence in learning the Rams' offense paid off when he totaled an NFL record 2,429 yards from scrimmage, eclipsing Barry Sanders's record of 2,358 yards set in 1997 (which has since been broken by Chris Johnson in 2009). With 1,381 yards rushing (5.5 yards-per-carry average), 1,048 receiving yards, and scoring 12 touchdowns, Faulk joined Roger Craig as the only men to total 1,000+ yards in each category in a season. He also broke the NFL season record for most receiving yards by a running back, previously held by Lionel James. The Rams eventually went on to win Super Bowl XXXIV. In the game, Faulk was contained on the ground by Tennessee Titans head coach Jeff Fisher's defensive scheme, limiting him to just 17 rushing yards. This was perhaps due to the Titans' inability to stop the Rams' passing game, of which Faulk was a major part, recording 5 receptions for 90 yards. His 90 receiving yards were the second highest total by a running back in Super Bowl history. At the end of the season, he received the NFL Offensive Player of the Year Award and was a starter for the NFC squad in the 1999 Pro Bowl.

The following year, Faulk became the first running back in NFL history to lead his team in receptions five separate seasons (three in Indianapolis and twice in St. Louis). In addition, he was the NFL MVP and again the Offensive Player of the Year in 2000. He had 1,359 yards rushing in fourteen games and set a new NFL record with 26 total touchdowns, (a record that would soon be broken by Priest Holmes and then later by Shaun Alexander and LaDainian Tomlinson), despite missing two games due to injury. He also averaged 5+ yards per carry again, this time with 5.4. The Rams, however were not able to replicate the record they had the year prior. Even with the offense scoring the most points and yards during the "The Greatest Show on Turf" era, the defense gave up 470 points.

The Rams returned to the Super Bowl the next year as their defense returned to form, allowing only 273 points, and the offense once again scored over 500 points, with 503. Faulk had another excellent season, rushing 260 times for a career-high 1,382 yards (5.3 yards per carry), and catching 83 passes for 765 yards, for an NFC-leading total of 2,147 yards from scrimmage (second in the NFL only to Priest Holmes, who totaled 2,169 yards) and scoring 21 touchdowns despite once again missing 2 games to injuries. Faulk won, for the third year in a row, the NFL's Offensive Player of the Year award, but finished second in a close vote to teammate Kurt Warner in the MVP vote. These years would be the climax of Faulk's career.

Faulk's injuries and age would soon catch up to him; 2001 was the last of his 1,000-yard rushing seasons, and though he was still employed as the Rams' primary running back for several years following the 2001 season, he was no longer the player he had been in his prime, despite remaining a respected and effective player.

On July 29, 2002, Faulk signed a new seven-year, $43.95 million contract with the Rams. Faulk was about to enter the fourth year of his 1999 contract. In this new contract Faulk received a $10.7 million signing bonus.[9] In the 2002 season the Rams struggled and finished the year at 7-9. Faulk played in 14 games and started 10 and ended with 953 yards and 80 receptions. The following season he played in and started 11 games, finishing with 818 yards and 45 receptions as the Rams rebounded with a 12-4 record.

In 2004 Faulk split time with rookie Steven Jackson and played in 14 games and rushing for 774 yards. In February, 2005, Faulk agreed to a restructured contract to reduce his contract cap number. He was scheduled to make about $7.5 million in 2005. In the new contract received a total of $6 million in the next two seasons and a $2 million signing bonus was included.

On July 21, the Rams announced that Faulk would undergo reconstructive knee surgery and miss the entire 2006 NFL season. During the season Faulk served as an analyst for the NFL Network's NFL Total Access.

On November 29, 2007, the Rams announced that they would be retiring Faulk's number. The ceremony was during halftime of the Thursday night game against the Pittsburgh Steelers on December 20, 2007. In 2010 on "NFL Network presents The Top 100: NFL's Greatest Players", Faulk was voted the number 70 player of all time.

In 2011, Faulk's first year of eligibility, he was elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. As a running back, he placed first in receiving yards (6,875), second in pass receptions (767), second in receiving TD's (36), third in yards from scrimmage (19,154), and tenth in rushing yards (12,279).

His seven two-point conversions are an NFL record. His five games of 250+ yards from scrimmage and 14 games of 200+ yards from scrimmage are also NFL records. Marshall Faulk is the only player to have 70+ rushing touchdowns and 30+ receiving touchdowns.

He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2011.

 
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Who will be picked by the ClanRam members to represent the year WHO?

 

 

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