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  • Closest NCAA College ...

    ... Hey just wondering, which NCAA football college is closest to the Rams

    I was thinking Missouri but Im no doubt wrong,

    also aswell as the closest could you give us the next few cloest colleges to

    thx!

  • #2
    Re: Closest NCAA College ...

    Well, according to the Wikipedia map of Division 1 college football teams I'm looking at, Mizzou is the closest. Then you have Illinois, Arkansas st., and Vandy all relativley (just eyeballing it) the same distance away. But Mizzou by far is the closest.

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    • #3
      Re: Closest NCAA College ...

      Just kinda FYI, Division 1 AA wise, you have, again just eyeballing it, Southeast Missouri st., Southern Illinois, Eastern Illinois, Western Illinois, Mizzou st.,Illinois st., and Murray st. in that order I think. My god I have nothing to do!

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      • #4
        Re: Closest NCAA College ...

        The closest big name college to me is I think Alabama.

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