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Judge rules BC doesn't have to pay $5M Big East fee

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  • Judge rules BC doesn't have to pay $5M Big East fee

    Aug. 19, 2004
    SportsLine.com wire reports

    BOSTON -- The Big East can't impose a $5 million fine on Boston College for defecting to the Atlantic Coast Conference, and it can't force BC to remain in the conference for an extra 15 months, a Superior Court judge has ruled.

    The decision passed down Wednesday keeps Boston College on track to join the ACC next July and pay a $1 million withdrawal fee to the Big East.

    After Miami and Virginia Tech left the Big East for the ACC in June 2003, the presidents of the remaining Big East schools sought to deter further defections by raising the withdrawal fee from $1 million to $5 million and increasing the withdrawal notice from 12 to 27 months.

    Boston College supported the amendment when it was proposed in July 2003, but abstained from the Oct. 6, 2003, vote at which it was approved. Six days later, BC accepted an invitation to become the ACC's 12th member.

    When the Big East sought to impose the new penalties on BC, the school sued, saying the conference had improperly amended its constitution. The judge agreed, saying the Big East flouted its own rules when it created the harsher penalties.

    "Whatever Boston College might have said about its state of discussions or its expressed acceptance of a $5 million, 27-month penalty, that did not impede the Big East's ability to correctly amend its Constitution," Judge Allan van Gestel said in his ruling.

    "We are gratified that, after nearly a year of adverse and misleading public statements leveled against us, a respected judge has seen through to the actual merits of the case and has ruled in favor of Boston College," BC athletic director Gene DeFilippo said in a statement.

    Big East commissioner Mike Tranghese said the conference was "extremely disappointed" in the decision and was considering an appeal.


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  • DJRamFan
    MAC give contract extension to commissioner
    by DJRamFan
    Aug. 3, 2004
    SportsLine.com wire reports

    CLEVELAND -- The Mid-American Conference extended the contract of commissioner Rick Chryst through the 2008-2009 school year.

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    Since Chryst was appointed commissioner in May 1999, MAC football teams have made 54 appearances on national television.

    Last season, two MAC teams won bowl games: Bowling Green defeated Northwestern in the Motor City Bowl, and Miami of Ohio beat Louisville in the GMAC Bowl.

    "Rick is one of the most able, knowledgeable, and respected Division I-A commissioners and he has led the MAC through an unprecedented period of growth as the league has enhanced its athletic competitiveness while maintaining the highest academic and sportsmanship standards," said Dr. John Peters of Northern Illinois, chair of the MAC Council of Presidents.

    Chryst joined the MAC after serving as assistant commissioner in the Atlantic Coast Conference (1992-99) and the Southwest Conference (1989-92).

    "I look forward to continuing to build on the successes of the last several years, in an environment that will remain challenging and changing," Chryst said.



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    Copyright 2004, The Associated Press, All Rights Reserved
    -08-03-2004, 11:09 AM
  • DJRamFan
    FAMU stripped of 11 conference titles, let back in MEAC
    by DJRamFan
    July 22, 2004
    SportsLine.com wire reports

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- The Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference followed through with its proposed punishment against Florida A&M for 196 NCAA rule violations, and stripped the Rattlers of 11 conference titles, including two in football.

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    But that football program -- no longer the 2000 and 2001 champions -- has been allowed back into the MEAC in 2005, the last chapter in FAMU's aborted jump to Division I-A last season. FAMU will compete as a I-AA independent this season.

    Florida A&M will also forfeit regular season conference titles in men's tennis (2000), men's indoor track (2002), women's indoor track (1998-2000), women's outdoor track (1998-2000) and volleyball (1999).

    In addition, FAMU must return the $175,000 it had received for winning four women's and three men's conference all-sports titles. The MEAC presents $25,000 checks for each all-sports championship.

    MEAC commissioner Dennis Thomas informed the school of the penalties in a letter last month.

    Joseph Ramsey II, the special assistant for athletics to school president Fred Gainous, said Gainous will decide no later than Friday whether to appeal.

    "Based on what I'm hearing and what I've read, there are 196 infractions," said Rev. R.B. Holmes Jr. of Tallahassee, a member of the board of trustees. "What are you going to appeal? The great number of infractions tells me we don't need to spin this. We need to fix this."

    FAMU earlier had confessed to the violations committed between 1998 and 2003, most dealing with the academic eligibility of student-athletes.

    In the school's report, FAMU listed self-imposed sanctions that included three years' probation for the school; the loss of four partial and two full scholarships in football and one each in baseball, women's basketball and women's track in each of the next three academic years.

    FAMU also said it would cut four official visits in football in each of the next three years.

    The NCAA is conducting its own investigation, which could result in sanctions beyond those proposed by the school.



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    Copyright 2004, The Associated Press, All Rights Reserved
    -07-25-2004, 03:57 PM
  • DJRamFan
    Conference USA eyes football title game in '05
    by DJRamFan
    Aug. 20, 2004
    SportsLine.com wire reports

    Conference USA athletic directors have voted unanimously to recommend holding the league's inaugural football championship game in 2005.

    The recommendation made Thursday now goes before the league's board of directors.

    The game would feature champions from two divisions. East Carolina, Marshall, Memphis, Southern Mississippi, UAB and Central Florida will compete in the East Division and Houston, Rice, SMU, Tulane, Tulsa, and UTEP will play in the West.

    The team with the highest conference winning percentage would host the championship game.

    "We also feel there are a number of advantages to the schools and the host community," Southern Miss athletic director Richard Giannini said. "This format is not only the best method to determine our champion, but will provide excellent media exposure for the schools and the community, including the economic impact a game like this creates."

    Conference USA would become one of five Division I-A conferences to hold a football championship game. The Big 12, Southeastern Conference and Mid-American Conference currently play football championship games, and the Atlantic Coast Conference will add a championship game in 2005.

    Next year, Conference USA will add six schools: Marshall, Rice, SMU, Tulsa, UCF and UTEP.

    Current members Cincinnati, DePaul, Louisville, Marquette and South Florida are moving to the Big East in 2005.



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    -08-20-2004, 01:07 PM
  • DJRamFan
    ACC wants to give players another year to complete degrees
    by DJRamFan
    July 28, 2004
    SportsLine.com wire reports

    GREENSBORO, N.C. -- The Atlantic Coast Conference has proposed making football players eligible to compete for five years, saying the extra season might allow some students to get their degrees rather than leave school early.

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    The NCAA will vote on the proposal no earlier than April 2005, said Shane Lyons, the ACC's associate commissioner.

    "Many students who have exhausted eligibility have to make a decision about whether they pursue their professional or athletic career without getting their education," Lyons said in a phone interview Tuesday. "We believe it's more likely that student athletes will return if they still have that eligibility."

    The ACC, which proposed the rule to the NCAA earlier this month, suggested that the NCAA eliminate redshirt seasons, when players are on the team but don't play. A redshirt season does not count toward eligibility.

    About 70 percent of college football players are redshirted, Lyons said.

    The proposal shouldn't increase costs because the scholarship limit will remain at 85, he said. "The pool of athletes may be around a year longer than they are now," he said.

    The average student, not just one who plays sports, takes 4.8 years to graduate, said Lyons, citing an NCAA study. In addition, the NCAA's new academic standards are based on five years for a degree, he said.

    The National Association of Basketball Coaches has proposed similar legislation for men's and women's basketball players. The American Football Coaches Association has supported the legislation for several years, Lyons said.


    AP NEWS
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    Copyright 2004, The Associated Press, All Rights Reserved
    -07-29-2004, 10:18 AM
  • DJRamFan
    Groh agrees to new five-year contract with Virginia
    by DJRamFan
    Aug. 19, 2005
    CBS SportsLine.com wire reports




    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- Virginia football coach Al Groh agreed to a new five-year contract Friday that will make his annual compensation $1.7 million, a raise of nearly $1 million over the first contract he signed with the school.

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    Groh went 30-21 in the first four years of his original seven-year deal, which will be superseded by the new contract, school officials said.

    The new deal calls for an annual salary of $240,000 and $1.46 million in compensation for fund-raising responsibilities, radio and television appearances and product endorsements. It also includes possible bonuses if Virginia goes to a bowl game.

    Groh's original seven-year deal included a salary of $200,000 and total compensation of $765,000 annually.

    "Coach Groh has provided strong leadership for the university's football program, and we want to ensure continuity in its future academic and athletic successes," athletic director Craig Littlepage said in a statement released by the school.

    The Cavaliers have won at least eight games and played in a bowl the past three years under Groh, who left after one season as head coach of the New York Jets to return to his alma mater and replace the retiring George Welsh in 2001.

    "In part, this contract also is driven by the view that our program is emerging as a top 20 program under his guidance and has been in contention for the Atlantic Coast Conference title," Littlepage said.

    Virginia opens this season at home against Western Michigan on Sept. 3.

    AP NEWS
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    -08-19-2005, 03:23 PM
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