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2019 Senior Bowl: Offensive prospects who'll have great value later in 2019 NFL Draft

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  • 2019 Senior Bowl: Offensive prospects who'll have great value later in 2019 NFL Draft

    2019 Senior Bowl: Offensive prospects who'll have great value later in 2019 NFL Draft
    These offensive prospects likely won't go early in the draft but will have great value when they're picked
    By Chris Trapasso
    @ChrisTrapasso
    Jan 17, 2019 • 3 min read

    The 2019 NFL Draft will feature a defensive-heavy class of prospects, and many of the top offensive players are underclassmen.

    That means this year's Senior Bowl isn't oozing with first-round picks on the offensive side of the ball. So what? How about zeroing in on some prospects who'll ultimately come with outstanding value later in the draft? Those are always fun to identify.

    Keelan Doss, WR, UC Davis
    After emerging as a budding star in 2016 with 10 receiving scores, Doss put back-to-back 110-plus catch seasons on his collegiate resume, and he topped 1,300 yards in each of the last two years.

    At 6-foot-3 and around 210 pounds, he has an athletic frame that allows him to explode off the line, quickly gain then sustain speed downfield, contort his body to make receptions on inaccurate passes, and morph into a tall running back after the ball is in his hands.

    It'll be interesting to monitor how much difficulty Doss' combination of length and athleticism gives the Senior Bowl cornerbacks next week.

    Ryquell Armstead, RB, Temple
    Armstead plays with a lot of controlled power. What I mean by that is he doesn't simply look for contact and lower his head every time he carries the football. When defenders get to him, they bounce off because he runs so hard. Armstead is a north-south back with light feet capable of delivering a quick spin move or efficient jump cut at the second level to make linebackers miss.

    He's quicker than fast but sneaks through crevasses in the line between the tackles. Armstead won't hit many 50-yard home runs, but he's a blue-collar runner with deceptive athleticism who can be a quality No. 2 ball-carrier in the NFL because of his vision, wherewithal, and twitchiness.

    Andre Dillard, OT, Washington State
    Dillard needs to get stronger. There's no doubt about that. But he probably got more pass-protection reps than any other left tackle in the country over the past three seasons playing at Washington State, and his amazing athletic gifts allow him to stay under control and extraordinarily balanced essentially every time he's asked to block on a pass play.

    He'll likely be tested the most against bull rushes, but if Dillard shows improved anchoring skills in Mobile, the Washington State star will prove his worth as a high-quality value pick in the 2019 class.

    Myles Gaskin, RB, Washington
    All Gaskin did in his four-year career with the Huskies was piece together four-straight 1,200-plus yard seasons with 57 rushing scores at a hefty 5.6 yards per pop.

    He may not hit the 200-pound threshold, but Gaskin rarely takes big hits because of his subtle agility in tight quarters and has tremendous balance after absorbing contact. He's another "quicker than fast" back. I won't call him slow down the field though. Gaskin will beat some linebackers to the corner and once he gets there, he can shift it into top gear and get down the field in the hurry.
    As his production indicates, Gaskin is simply a natural ball-carrier. He sees lanes before the blocks that open them are delivered, has a low center of gravity, and enough twitch to make dynamic cuts at all levels of the field. I won't be surprised if he's the most impressive back in Mobile.

    David Sills, WR, West Virginia
    The 6-foot-4, 210-pound Sills caught a ridiculous 33 touchdowns over the past two seasons. And while he's somewhat slight of frame, his long-striding style helps him create separation down the field.

    While an occasional drop isn't unusual, Sills is an effortless hands-catcher with a gigantic catch radius. He wasn't pressed often in the Big 12, but flashed the ability to win there with hand work and basketball-like crossovers.

    Sills could land early on Day 3 and as he takes the first year or so to get stronger and to learn to master running more routes, he could be very useful as a towering field stretcher -- even as a "big slot" -- right away at the NFL level.

    Chuma Edoga, OT, USC
    Listed at 6-4 and 295 pounds, it's easy to guess Edoga's weakness as a blocker when it comes to projecting him to the next level. He's not heavy enough and doesn't play with another power at the point of attack. However, he glides in pass-protection and has long limbs, the ideal blend of physical attributes to control edge-rushers and away from his frame where they can out-muscle him.

    Edoga will likely go later in the draft because of his strength deficiency which, after a year or two in an NFL conditioning program, could be totally eradicated.

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  • Nick
    East-West Shrine Game: 2020 NFL Draft prospects to watch
    by Nick
    East-West Shrine Game: 2020 NFL Draft prospects to watch include sleeper at running back
    These are the draft prospects you need to watch in the Shrine Game on Saturday
    Chris Trapasso
    @ChrisTrapasso
    20 hrs ago • 4 min read

    The East-West Shrine Game is the first big all-star game of the pre-draft process, and while not featuring as many high-profile prospects as the Senior Bowl, it's undoubtedly a worthwhile event in which a handful of participants will eventually make plays in the NFL. Some will become stars.

    Recent alumni include Jimmy Garoppolo, Za'Darius Smith, Justin Simmons, Terron Armstead and Shaq Barrett.

    Here are the five prospects from each team to keep a close eye on during this year's game.

    East Team

    Michael Onwenu, G, Michigan
    Onwenu is a large, heavy guard who carries his 350-plus pounds well. His frame is very unusual in that he has shorter arms and isn't imposingly tall. Because of his size, he's rarely pushed back into the quarterback and plays with high-level awareness of stunts and blitzes with just enough lateral movement to get to a secondary block when needed. Most offensive line prospects aren't "NFL strong" as rookies. It looks like Onwenu is.

    Kendall Coleman, EDGE, Syracuse
    Coleman is a technician with his hands, rarely letting offensive tackles to get into his frame, and when they do, his arsenal of pass-rushing moves allows him to counter. While not overly twitchy, Coleman is decently smooth once his momentum starts moving forward, an attribute which gives way to an effective inside move. Coleman needs to get stronger, because at times he can get manhandled. But the senior was productive thanks to his fundamentally sound hand usage during his time with the Orange.


    Parnell Motley, CB, Oklahoma
    On mostly average-at-best Oklahoma defenses, Motley stood out as a play-making cornerback. His pass breakup figures improved from nine to 11 to 13 in his final three seasons with the Sooners, and he hauled in six interceptions in that span. Listed at 6-feet and 180 pounds, Motley isn't super strong and his hips can be a little tight, but his feet are lightning quick, and he obviously plays with high-end awareness at the catch point.

    Alex Highsmith, EDGE, Charlotte
    Highsmith went into the season with a fair amount of draft hype after 18.5 tackles for loss in 2018. Then, the 6-foot-3, 240-ish pound edge rusher amassed 21.5 tackles for loss and 15 sacks in 2019. He held his own against Clemson early in the year and flashed a nice blend of quickness, power, and hand use around the corner as a senior. There will definitely be Day 3 appeal with Highsmith in April.

    Garrett Marino, DT, UAB
    A strong penetrator on the inside, the 6-foot-2, 290-pound Marino tallied 6.5 sacks and 12.5 tackles for loss for UAB in 2019. And he reached those figures in many ways....
    -01-17-2020, 04:57 AM
  • Nick
    Dane Brugler’s Top 10 Senior Bowl storylines
    by Nick
    Dane Brugler’s Top 10 Senior Bowl storylines: Drew Lock vs. Daniel Jones the main attraction
    By Dane Brugler Jan 21, 2019 19

    For​ one week every January,​ the​ NFL​ invades Mobile, Ala.,​ for the annual​ Reese’s Senior​ Bowl. The​ all-star exhibition fields​ the top​​ senior college prospects for an audition in front of hundreds of NFL scouts, coaches and evaluators.

    The Senior Bowl game is scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 26, at 2:30 p.m. ET at Ladd-Peebles Stadium and will be aired on NFL Network. However, it is the daily practices throughout the week that truly matter for the NFL evaluators in attendance.

    The North Team will be coached by the Oakland Raiders and the South team will be coached by the San Francisco *****.

    Below are 10 storylines to track during Senior Bowl week.

    10. Washington State’s Andre Dillard is the top offensive lineman in Mobile — does he live up to that high billing?
    Evaluating Washington State offensive linemen can be a difficult task with the wide splits and the quick-strike design of the offense. Nonetheless, left tackle Andre Dillard is one of the most impressive blockers I have studied on tape this fall, projecting as the top senior offensive lineman on my draft board.

    With his light feet, body flexibility and core power, Dillard is rarely beat around the corner, maintaining his balance in his movements. His lack of length is a concern, but he uses quick reflexes and a violent swipe to eliminate the reach of rushers. Dillard’s ability to process and play under control will be vital traits during practice drills.

    A strong week in Mobile could help Dillard go from a possible first-round pick to a probable first-round pick. But it won’t be easy going up against the quarterback assassins on the South squad like Old Dominion’s Oshane Ximines, who also is looking to prove why he belongs in the top-32 discussion.

    9. Premium pass rush talent ready to steal the show
    Regardless of the names on the back of the jerseys, the quarterbacks are always the main attraction at all-star games. However, the quarterback hunters off the edge like Ximines will attempt to change that this week during Senior Bowl practices.

    The NCAA’s all-time sack leader, Louisiana Tech’s Jaylon Ferguson, surpassed Terrell Suggs’ record with 45 career sacks and is looking to make it back-to-back years with a first-round Conference USA pass rusher (Marcus Davenport). It is easy to spot Ferguson on film because he is routinely the first defensive lineman out of his stance, using his quickness, motor and length to get blockers off schedule. If those traits show during practices, he will cement top-40 status in the eyes of some scouts.

    Although he is a better run defender than pass rusher right now, Boston College’s Zach Allen has the violent hands and contact balance to win off the edge. He projects as more of a base...
    -01-22-2019, 06:05 AM
  • Nick
    Official 2020 Senior Bowl Thread
    by Nick
    Post all of your Senior Bowl news here!...
    -01-18-2020, 07:01 AM
  • Nick
    NFL Draft Preview: Winks' Top 100 NFL Draft Prospects
    by Nick
    NFL DRAFT PREVIEW - WINKS' TOP 100 NFL DRAFT PROSPECTS
    BY HAYDEN WINKS
    April 14, 2020, 1:54 am ET
    Updated On: April 14, 2020, 3:50 am ET

    I did a lot of cool things last year with the NFL Draft -- and it led to an FSWA award (shoutout to me) -- but my process this draft season was much better because I had more time now that I'm a full-timer here at Rotoworld. Compared to other draft analysts, it's fair to say I lean a lot more on analytics, but I watched a vast amount of tape on all these prospects. Here are the things that I'm looking for at each position, which are ranked in order of importance to building a championship roster:

    QB: production, accuracy, decision-making, mobility
    CB: speed, agility, length, production allowed, ball skills
    EDGE: speed/burst, agility, production, size
    OT: pass-blocking, agility, size/strength, run-blocking, speed
    Outside WR: production, separation at LOS, speed, ball skills
    Slot WR: production, separation at LOS, agility, YAC
    LB: speed, coverage skills, tackle production, agility
    S: instincts, versatility, speed, tackling
    DT: speed/burst, production, agility, size/strength
    TE: speed, production, agility, size, run-blocking
    IOL: pass-blocking, run-blocking, size/strength, agility, speed
    RB: production, receiving ability, speed, agility, size, pass-blocking

    And for all positions, I'm heavily weighing youth (great players usually declare early) and prospects who went to good programs (great players usually play on good teams). With that laid out, here are my 2020 NFL Draft rankings:



    1ST ROUND GRADES

    1. Joe Burrow - QB1
    Burrow (6’3/221) became the consensus No. 1 overall prospect after setting the new FBS record for passing touchdowns (60) in his Heisman winning season at LSU. His accuracy, poise, and ability to read defenses led to the second-best completion percentage (76%) since at least 1956, and are traits that typically translate to the NFL. His arm strength is quite average for a first rounder pocket passer, but doesn’t limit him from making downfield and sideline passes. A former all-state high school basketball player, he was able to average 24.5 rushing yards per game as an underrated scrambler, although he does most of his damage within the pocket. As a 23-year-old rookie with elite mental makeup, Burrow should be considered as a Rookie of the Year favorite and potential decade-long NFL starter, likely for the Cincinnati Bengals.

    2. Tua Tagovailoa - QB2
    Two ankle surgeries and a dislocated hip likely cost Tagovailoa (6’0/217) the No. 1 overall pick, but post-Combine medical scans have been relatively positive, although a redshirt rookie season can’t be completely ruled out. When healthy, Tagovailoa is a very accurate and aggressive in-pocket passer. He finished second in Total QBR among FBS quarterbacks...
    -04-14-2020, 05:37 AM
  • Nick
    2018 DRAFT Round 3 #89: Rams take Joseph Noteboom, OT, TCU
    by Nick
    Scouting Report: Joseph Noteboom
    2018 NFL Mock Draft
    DraftGeek’s Mock Draft
    School: TCU Position: Offensive Tackle Class: Senior Height: 6-5 Weight: 319 lbs Projected Draft Round: 4-6

    Scouting Report:
    Has a confounding prospect profile that is typical of most of the offensive linemen coming into the NFL lately- shows signs of good technique, balance, hand usage, bend, etc., but is wildly inconsistent. This pattern has much more to do with the offensive systems and the type of coaching they are receiving, as it doesn’t match what is expected of them in the next level. However, he showed well during the Senior Bowl, and if teams decide that circumstance is the reason that his tape is what it is, he could move into middle, even upper rounds. He has a big frame, but needs to add more quality bulk, but his athleticism and technique have shown enough to get the attention of scouts.




    Joseph Noteboom | 68
    OT | SR | TCU
    Ht: 6050 | Wt: 322 | Upd: 12/28/2017
    Hometown: Plano, Texas | High School: Plano High School
    Ourlads' Profile:

    At this point in mid-October, what was initially perceived to be a solid left tackle class after an underwhelming group in 2017 has more question marks than answers. The top players to watch at the position have either been hurt or don’t appear to have the foot speed for the left side. The top spot is still very much up for grabs.
    A name that was only somewhat on the radar prior to the season but has been creeping his way up is Joseph Noteboom, a fifth year senior and three year starter from TCU. In his first year on the left side, he has showed consistent foot speed and technique. The ultra-wide wingspan and easy kick slide make him a tough guy to beat off the edge. When his balance is there, Noteboom has showed the ability to neutralize both speed and power rushers alike. He does a solid job of keeping his hands inside with proper knee bend foot separation, making him able to maintain his power. There is still a lot of strength development and progression to be done, but his frame is easily something an NFL team can work with and matched with what he already has, there is a very high ceiling to work with here.
    Dave Syvertsen, Ourlads' Senior Draft Analyst



    Analysis
    By Lance Zierlein
    NFL Analyst
    Draft Projection
    Round 2-3

    Overview
    Noteboom flashes the technique, hand usage, and athleticism you want out of the position but he doesn't do those things with enough consistency. His inability to gain and secure positioning as a move blocker is a concern as is his consistency as a finisher in running game. Noteboom was one of the tackles who flashed at the Senior Bowl in one-on-one drills and had a great workout at the Combine. The tape says day three, but his work during the "draft season" should get him drafted on the second day with...
    -04-27-2018, 08:24 PM
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