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East-West Shrine Game: 2020 NFL Draft prospects to watch

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  • East-West Shrine Game: 2020 NFL Draft prospects to watch

    East-West Shrine Game: 2020 NFL Draft prospects to watch include sleeper at running back
    These are the draft prospects you need to watch in the Shrine Game on Saturday
    Chris Trapasso
    @ChrisTrapasso
    20 hrs ago • 4 min read

    The East-West Shrine Game is the first big all-star game of the pre-draft process, and while not featuring as many high-profile prospects as the Senior Bowl, it's undoubtedly a worthwhile event in which a handful of participants will eventually make plays in the NFL. Some will become stars.

    Recent alumni include Jimmy Garoppolo, Za'Darius Smith, Justin Simmons, Terron Armstead and Shaq Barrett.

    Here are the five prospects from each team to keep a close eye on during this year's game.

    East Team

    Michael Onwenu, G, Michigan
    Onwenu is a large, heavy guard who carries his 350-plus pounds well. His frame is very unusual in that he has shorter arms and isn't imposingly tall. Because of his size, he's rarely pushed back into the quarterback and plays with high-level awareness of stunts and blitzes with just enough lateral movement to get to a secondary block when needed. Most offensive line prospects aren't "NFL strong" as rookies. It looks like Onwenu is.

    Kendall Coleman, EDGE, Syracuse
    Coleman is a technician with his hands, rarely letting offensive tackles to get into his frame, and when they do, his arsenal of pass-rushing moves allows him to counter. While not overly twitchy, Coleman is decently smooth once his momentum starts moving forward, an attribute which gives way to an effective inside move. Coleman needs to get stronger, because at times he can get manhandled. But the senior was productive thanks to his fundamentally sound hand usage during his time with the Orange.


    Parnell Motley, CB, Oklahoma
    On mostly average-at-best Oklahoma defenses, Motley stood out as a play-making cornerback. His pass breakup figures improved from nine to 11 to 13 in his final three seasons with the Sooners, and he hauled in six interceptions in that span. Listed at 6-feet and 180 pounds, Motley isn't super strong and his hips can be a little tight, but his feet are lightning quick, and he obviously plays with high-end awareness at the catch point.

    Alex Highsmith, EDGE, Charlotte
    Highsmith went into the season with a fair amount of draft hype after 18.5 tackles for loss in 2018. Then, the 6-foot-3, 240-ish pound edge rusher amassed 21.5 tackles for loss and 15 sacks in 2019. He held his own against Clemson early in the year and flashed a nice blend of quickness, power, and hand use around the corner as a senior. There will definitely be Day 3 appeal with Highsmith in April.

    Garrett Marino, DT, UAB
    A strong penetrator on the inside, the 6-foot-2, 290-pound Marino tallied 6.5 sacks and 12.5 tackles for loss for UAB in 2019. And he reached those figures in many ways. He won with first-step quickness through a gap, a deadly swim move, or simply shedding blockers on his way into the backfield. While not a super athlete for the defensive tackle position, Marino has an NFL-caliber toolbox to be disruptive on the inside.


    West Team

    LeVante Bellamy, RB, Western Michigan
    Speed. Speed. And more speed. That's what you get with Bellamy. He brings a full-throttled game to every contest. The 5-foot-9, 190-pound burner had runs of 47, 55, 73, and 75 yards as a redshirt senior and averaged a bulky 6.0 yards per carry over 617 totes in his illustrious career for the Broncos. He scored 23 times in 2019 and has some lateral juice along with good vision, so he's not just a straight-line player.

    Calvin Throckmorton, OL, Oregon
    Throckmorton was Mr. Reliable for the Ducks in his long career in Eugene, as he played multiple positions across the line and didn't look out of place in any of them. The senior relies on good fundamentals, a strong base, and good balance to flourish, as he's not a dancing bear by any stretch of the imagination and will probably be plugged in at guard in the NFL.

    Kevin Dotston, OL, Louisiana-Lafayette
    Dotson is a steamroller in the run game at 6-foot-4 and 320-plus pounds. While he's not exactly light on his feet, his steps are efficient and get him to where he needs to be on combo blocks. He plays with outstanding knee bend, so he rarely loses the leverage battle. And once he latches on, it's over. His run-blocking is ahead of his ability as a pass protector at this point, but Dotson's inherent strength allows him to anchor well and his plus balance keeps him under control on pass plays.

    Raequan Williams, DT, Michigan State
    While run-stopping specialists aren't as valuable as they once were, there are still spots for them in a defensive line rotation in the NFL. And Williams is as good as they come halting inside run plays. The nose tackle accumulated 18 tackles for loss and seven sacks in his final two seasons at Michigan State. His hands constantly fire into offensive linemen, and they're strong enough to effortlessly dispatch them on his way to the ball-carrier. He's up there with Derrick Brown in terms of block-defeating, run-stopping prowess.

    Luq Barcoo, CB, San Diego State
    The lanky outside corner was a football magnet in 2019 with nine interceptions and 16 pass breakups. He reacts instantly in zone and has the length needed to get his hands on the football as often as he did. A zone-heavy team could very well be interested him on the third day of the draft.

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  • Nick
    NFL Draft Preview: Winks' Top 100 NFL Draft Prospects
    by Nick
    NFL DRAFT PREVIEW - WINKS' TOP 100 NFL DRAFT PROSPECTS
    BY HAYDEN WINKS
    April 14, 2020, 1:54 am ET
    Updated On: April 14, 2020, 3:50 am ET

    I did a lot of cool things last year with the NFL Draft -- and it led to an FSWA award (shoutout to me) -- but my process this draft season was much better because I had more time now that I'm a full-timer here at Rotoworld. Compared to other draft analysts, it's fair to say I lean a lot more on analytics, but I watched a vast amount of tape on all these prospects. Here are the things that I'm looking for at each position, which are ranked in order of importance to building a championship roster:

    QB: production, accuracy, decision-making, mobility
    CB: speed, agility, length, production allowed, ball skills
    EDGE: speed/burst, agility, production, size
    OT: pass-blocking, agility, size/strength, run-blocking, speed
    Outside WR: production, separation at LOS, speed, ball skills
    Slot WR: production, separation at LOS, agility, YAC
    LB: speed, coverage skills, tackle production, agility
    S: instincts, versatility, speed, tackling
    DT: speed/burst, production, agility, size/strength
    TE: speed, production, agility, size, run-blocking
    IOL: pass-blocking, run-blocking, size/strength, agility, speed
    RB: production, receiving ability, speed, agility, size, pass-blocking

    And for all positions, I'm heavily weighing youth (great players usually declare early) and prospects who went to good programs (great players usually play on good teams). With that laid out, here are my 2020 NFL Draft rankings:



    1ST ROUND GRADES

    1. Joe Burrow - QB1
    Burrow (6’3/221) became the consensus No. 1 overall prospect after setting the new FBS record for passing touchdowns (60) in his Heisman winning season at LSU. His accuracy, poise, and ability to read defenses led to the second-best completion percentage (76%) since at least 1956, and are traits that typically translate to the NFL. His arm strength is quite average for a first rounder pocket passer, but doesn’t limit him from making downfield and sideline passes. A former all-state high school basketball player, he was able to average 24.5 rushing yards per game as an underrated scrambler, although he does most of his damage within the pocket. As a 23-year-old rookie with elite mental makeup, Burrow should be considered as a Rookie of the Year favorite and potential decade-long NFL starter, likely for the Cincinnati Bengals.

    2. Tua Tagovailoa - QB2
    Two ankle surgeries and a dislocated hip likely cost Tagovailoa (6’0/217) the No. 1 overall pick, but post-Combine medical scans have been relatively positive, although a redshirt rookie season can’t be completely ruled out. When healthy, Tagovailoa is a very accurate and aggressive in-pocket passer. He finished second in Total QBR among FBS quarterbacks...
    -04-14-2020, 04:37 AM
  • Nick
    2019 Senior Bowl: Offensive prospects who'll have great value later in 2019 NFL Draft
    by Nick
    2019 Senior Bowl: Offensive prospects who'll have great value later in 2019 NFL Draft
    These offensive prospects likely won't go early in the draft but will have great value when they're picked
    By Chris Trapasso
    @ChrisTrapasso
    Jan 17, 2019 3 min read

    The 2019 NFL Draft will feature a defensive-heavy class of prospects, and many of the top offensive players are underclassmen.

    That means this year's Senior Bowl isn't oozing with first-round picks on the offensive side of the ball. So what? How about zeroing in on some prospects who'll ultimately come with outstanding value later in the draft? Those are always fun to identify.

    Keelan Doss, WR, UC Davis
    After emerging as a budding star in 2016 with 10 receiving scores, Doss put back-to-back 110-plus catch seasons on his collegiate resume, and he topped 1,300 yards in each of the last two years.

    At 6-foot-3 and around 210 pounds, he has an athletic frame that allows him to explode off the line, quickly gain then sustain speed downfield, contort his body to make receptions on inaccurate passes, and morph into a tall running back after the ball is in his hands.

    It'll be interesting to monitor how much difficulty Doss' combination of length and athleticism gives the Senior Bowl cornerbacks next week.

    Ryquell Armstead, RB, Temple
    Armstead plays with a lot of controlled power. What I mean by that is he doesn't simply look for contact and lower his head every time he carries the football. When defenders get to him, they bounce off because he runs so hard. Armstead is a north-south back with light feet capable of delivering a quick spin move or efficient jump cut at the second level to make linebackers miss.

    He's quicker than fast but sneaks through crevasses in the line between the tackles. Armstead won't hit many 50-yard home runs, but he's a blue-collar runner with deceptive athleticism who can be a quality No. 2 ball-carrier in the NFL because of his vision, wherewithal, and twitchiness.

    Andre Dillard, OT, Washington State
    Dillard needs to get stronger. There's no doubt about that. But he probably got more pass-protection reps than any other left tackle in the country over the past three seasons playing at Washington State, and his amazing athletic gifts allow him to stay under control and extraordinarily balanced essentially every time he's asked to block on a pass play.

    He'll likely be tested the most against bull rushes, but if Dillard shows improved anchoring skills in Mobile, the Washington State star will prove his worth as a high-quality value pick in the 2019 class.

    Myles Gaskin, RB, Washington
    All Gaskin did in his four-year career with the Huskies was piece together four-straight 1,200-plus yard seasons with 57 rushing scores at a hefty 5.6 yards per pop.

    He may not hit the 200-pound threshold,...
    -01-22-2019, 02:22 PM
  • Nick
    Senior Bowl 2019: Defenders who can enter first-round conversation if they impress
    by Nick
    Senior Bowl 2019: Defensive prospects who can enter NFL Draft first-round conversation if they impress
    Three edge-rushers and two defensive backs can move into the first-round discussion if they impress in Mobile
    By Chris Trapasso
    @ChrisTrapasso
    Jan 16, 2019 3 min read

    While just a week of practices that precede an exhibition all-star game, every year an assortment of draft prospects see their stocks fluctuate based on what happens on the field at the Senior Bowl.

    The annual showcase takes place in Mobile, Alabama and boasts an impressive list of early-pick alumni, including Baker Mayfield, Carson Wentz, Von Miller, and Aaron Donald.

    This article examines the defensive prospects who start the pre-draft process in the Day Two conversation yet can jump start an ascension into Round 1 with strong showings at the Senior Bowl.

    Kris Boyd, CB, Texas
    Boyd had 15 pass breakups in 2017... and followed that up with 15 more pass breakups as a senior on a feisty, relatively stingy Texas defense. At 6-foot-0 and 195 pounds, Boyd has good, not great size to play on the outside in the NFL, but he's a twitchy plant-and-drive player who's very aggressive when the ball's arriving to its intended target, as evidenced by his high pass-breakup numbers.

    The Senior Bowl will be vital for Boyd as he tries to move into the first-round tier at the position. He's not a man or zone specialist necessarily, but his sticky coverage skills and the speed at which he closes on the football will be tested in Mobile. If he thrives in coverage, knocks away some passes, and shows the same tenacity stopping the run as he did in Austin, he could be on the fast track to Round 1 status.

    Jaylon Ferguson, EDGE, Louisiana Tech
    Ferguson's production speaks for itself. He had 67.5 tackles for loss and 45 sacks in his four seasons at Louisiana Tech and has NFL defensive end size at 6-5 and 262 pounds. But his counter moves are more impressive than his initial moves off the snap, meaning it can take him extra time to get to the quarterback. Also, he's not a bendy edge-rusher despite being a good, relatively explosive athlete.

    If Ferguson can piece together a solid week in Mobile, and does it by winning his reps quickly, landing in Round 1 will not be out of the question whatsoever.

    Juan Thornhill, S, Virginia
    Thornhill made the switch to full-time safety in 2018, and it paid off. He went from 63 tackles to 98. His interception total increased from four to six, and he still defended seven passes after knocking 12 to the ground in 2017. At 6-0 and 212 pounds, Thornhill has legitimate NFL safety size and is a fluid mover too who isn't timid about flying downhill in run support. However, despite his excellent range (that comes from his acceleration and sustained speed), Thornhill has a tendency to make out-of-control tackling attempts that,...
    -01-22-2019, 02:24 PM
  • Nick
    Dane Brugler’s Top-60 Draft Board: Seven quarterbacks crack updated list
    by Nick
    Dane Brugler’s Top-60 Draft Board: Seven quarterbacks crack updated list
    Dane Brugler
    1h ago 15

    Four quarterbacks made my preseason draft board. Over a month into the season, the same four quarterbacks remain, but now they are joined by three more passers – one expected, two not as expected.

    Washington’s Jacob Eason is expected. A 6-5, 230-pound passer with elite arm talent, it hasn’t been surprising to see him performing well. The impressive skill set was obvious when he took the field as a true freshman at Georgia, but after missing the last two seasons, the sample size wasn’t there. Now that he has put five games on film for the Huskies, it is impossible to keep him off this list.

    The two other quarterback additions to the draft board are much more unexpected: LSU’s Joe Burrow and Oklahoma’s Jalen Hurts. In fact, I extended this list from my top-50 to my top-60 to include both of them.

    It’s important to note that Burrow didn’t come out of nowhere. He was highly recruited out of high school and narrowly lost the quarterback battle with Dwayne Haskins at Ohio State. Last year in his first season at LSU, Burrow was solid and received mid-round draft grades from myself and others around the league. But so far in 2019, he looks like a much more confident and seasoned passer, flashing NFL starting traits.

    Facing Houston, South Dakota, UCLA and Texas Tech this season, Hurts has yet to be truly tested by a defense with a pulse, which clouds the evaluation. But that doesn’t mean you ignore what Hurts has put on tape, showing tremendous development as a passer, especially within the pocket. He benefits from an elite supporting cast with terrific protection, dynamic skill players and an offensive system that caters to his strengths. However, the execution and production are the responsibility of the quarterback and Hurts has been stellar. Five weeks into the college football season, I’m glad I don’t have to put a final grade on him yet, but NFL scouts are starting to believe in Hurts’ next level potential.

    It is still early in the process and this list will continue to fluctuate as we gain more information and learn about these prospects. But if the 2020 NFL Draft was tomorrow…

    *Indicates draft-eligible underclassman

    1. *Chase Young, EDGE, Ohio State (6-5, 266, 4.76)

    Once the 2019 NFL Draft ended, Young was the clear No. 1 draft-eligible prospect for the 2020 draft class. Over a month into the 2019 season, he has only improved and widened that gap between him and the next-best nonquarterback in April’s draft.

    2. *Tua Tagovailoa, QB, Alabama (6-0, 232, 4.78)

    No, I don’t think Tagovailoa will be the consensus top quarterback for next year’s class. He won’t be for everyone due to his size and average arm...
    -09-30-2019, 07:04 AM
  • Nick
    With the 250th pick, LA Rams select TREMAYNE ANCHRUM, OL, CLEMSON
    by Nick


    Player Bio
    Anchrum's build is not that of a typical high-level offensive tackle. He's been an immovable object on the right side for the Tigers over the past four years, however, garnering first-team All-ACC honors as a senior and second-team all-conference notice as a junior. He started all 15 games both seasons, helping the team win a national title in 2018 and make it to the championship game the following year. Anchrum started one of 11 games played at the position as a true freshman, coming off an all-state senior season at McEachern High School in Georgia. He started six of 14 games played as a sophomore. His father, Tremayne, was an all-state football player in Colorado and played basketball at USC, where he led the Trojans in rebounding as a sophomore and in three-point shooting percentage as a junior.

    Analysis
    By Lance Zierlein
    NFL Analyst
    Draft Projection: Rounds 6-7


    Overview
    Short college tackle with good quickness and leverage. Will need to bump inside due to a lack of functional length. Anchrum does an excellent job of getting to landmarks laterally as a move blocker and has above-average body control to adjust and capture his second-level blocks. He has the tools to fire out and operate as a base blocker but could find himself controlled by two-gapping defensive tackles due to his short arms and average hand quickness. Despite his lack of desired size and length, he could be a nice, capable fit as a quality backup guard for a team looking to play in space.


    Strengths
    • Short in stature, but plays a confident brand of football
    • Sturdy build with big bubble
    • Quick out of stance and into his work
    • Pass slides are rhythmic and smooth
    • Above-average bend and agility
    • Quality lateral slides to mirror in protection
    • Excellent range to find proper positioning on outside zone
    • Accurate targeting run fits, using inside hands at proper pad level
    • Fluid and controlled adjusting and striking second-level targets

    Weaknesses
    • Sawed-off frame lacks desired length
    • Loses the battle to land first hands into the frame
    • Could have issues staying connected to blocks in the pros
    • Too much forward lean in pass punch to make up for arm length
    • Over-extends outside, giving away openings for inside counters
    • Anchor will be challenged by bull-rushers
    • Lacks experience as a guard
    • He needs to play with faster hands for his move inside
    ...
    -04-25-2020, 03:48 PM
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