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Celebrity lawyers meet government prosecutors in Lewis case

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  • Celebrity lawyers meet government prosecutors in Lewis case

    HARRY R. WEBER
    Associated Press

    ATLANTA - One side has a team of celebrity lawyers who have defended sports stars and high-profile murder suspects. The other has two government prosecutors who specialize in drug cases.

    Observers expect a dogfight as Baltimore Ravens running back Jamal Lewis and his childhood friend, Angelo Jackson, prepare for trial on federal drug conspiracy charges.

    "It's going to be a lot more about the facts than the number of years in the courtroom," said Kent Alexander, a former U.S. Attorney in Atlanta.

    Lewis, 24, is accused of helping broker a cocaine deal for Jackson during conversations with a government informant during the summer of 2000. Both Lewis and Jackson have pleaded not guilty.

    Lewis' defense team includes Ed Garland, who represented Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis on murder charges and is one of the lawyers for Atlanta Thrashers forward Dany Heatley, who was involved in a car crash that killed a teammate. Heatley has not been charged.

    Another lawyer representing Jamal Lewis is Jerome Froelich, who defended Fred Tokars against charges of money laundering, racketeering and arranging his wife's murder in 1992. Steve Sadow, who defended former Gold Club owner Steve Kaplan in a federal racketeering case, is a lawyer for Lewis co-defendant Jackson.

    "That's an all-star team," said Alexander. "They're all very good."

    On the government's side are prosecutors Mike Brown and Stephanie Elaine Gabay-Smith. Brown has handled numerous drug cases while working in the Atlanta office the last several years after transferring from the U.S. Attorney's office in Miami. Gabay-Smith is a member of the Southeast Drug Task Force.

    Sadow, on vacation in Greece on Thursday, described Brown as a "highly competent, thorough trial attorney." He is "aggressive yet congenial in front of a jury," Sadow said.

    Gabay-Smith is an aggressive prosecutor who has played on the U.S. Attorney's office basketball team, said Alexander, her former boss and the person who hired her. She used to work as a prosecutor in New York City, he said.

    "If she's half as competitive in the courtroom as she is on the basketball court, the government will be well-served" in the Lewis case, Alexander said. "She's got a lot of years of experience."

    Lawyers in the Lewis case continue to seek documents from each other. No trial date has been set.

    Froelich said Thursday there have been no discussions in the Lewis camp about a plea deal.

    "I'm preparing for trial," he said.

    The prosecutors declined through a spokesman to comment.

    Lewis and Jackson, who both grew up in the same area of Atlanta, are charged with conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute five kilograms of cocaine and using a cell phone in violation of federal law. Jackson, 26, is additionally charged with attempted cocaine possession.

    Prosecutors say audiotapes and videotapes of conversations involving Jackson, Lewis and the informant tie the defendants to the conspiracy. Defense lawyers have attacked the informant's credibility, noting that she has used several aliases and has numerous convictions in several states.

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  • DJRamFan
    J. Lewis pleads not guilty to attempted cocaine possession
    by DJRamFan
    Aug. 27, 2004
    SportsLine.com wire reports

    ATLANTA -- Baltimore Ravens running back Jamal Lewis did not appear at his arraignment Friday, but his lawyers entered a not guilty plea on charges in an expanded drug conspiracy indictment.

    Lawyers for Lewis and co-defendant Angelo Jackson showed up 40 minutes before the morning hearing was to begin and asked the court to start early, said Andy Burns, courtroom deputy to U.S. Magistrate Judge Gerrilyn G. Brill. Jackson appeared and pleaded not guilty.

    Lewis, already facing federal drug conspiracy charges issued in February, was hit Aug. 17 with an extra charge of attempting to possess cocaine.

    The charge was included in a superseding indictment, a common move in complicated cases where the government refines its original accusations. Jackson was already facing the attempted cocaine possession charge.

    Lewis, 24, is accused of trying to broker a cocaine deal in the summer of 2000 for Jackson, 26. The two men grew up in the same area of Atlanta. Their trial is set for Nov. 1.


    AP NEWS
    The Associated Press News Service

    Copyright 2004, The Associated Press, All Rights Reserved
    -08-28-2004, 01:32 PM
  • Truth
    Ray Lewis Available???
    by Truth
    Just read a story in the Minneapolis Star Tribune saying that Ray Lewis is looking to be traded. Ravens won't re-negotiate his contract, so he wants out.

    I know he's not the same Ray lewis he was a couple of years ago, but what a leader on the defense. I'd take him in half a heartbeat if we could get him. I wouldn't sell the farm, but I'd certainly look at what we might have to offer for him.
    -02-22-2006, 03:06 PM
  • bruce4life
    thurman won't be back with bengals next year...
    by bruce4life
    CINCINNATI -- Coach Marvin Lewis refused to talk about suspended linebacker Odell Thurman on Tuesday, another indication that he has written him out of the Cincinnati Bengals' plans.


    Thurman


    Thurman was suspended for the season because he violated the NFL's substance abuse policy. He can apply to the league for reinstatement before next season.

    Lewis has been upset with the middle linebacker's repeated off-field problems, and took his locker away when the NFL handed down its suspension. Lewis also told Thurman to stay away from the team.

    "Odell is not a member of this football team," Lewis said Tuesday. "He's on suspension by the NFL. He's got a long road to go. I'm not even going to spend any time talking about Odell.

    "We're talking about our '07 season. He's not part of this football team. We don't need to talk about it."

    Thurman and receiver Chris Henry epitomized the underlying problems with the '06 Bengals.

    Thurman was a second-round draft pick in 2005 and started 15 games as a rookie. He led the team in tackles, tied for the lead in forced fumbles, and had five interceptions, the most by any rookie in the NFL.

    It appeared that Thurman, who came out of Georgia with questions about his character, was a defensive star in the making. But he got a four-game suspension from the league for missing an offseason drug test.

    After a victory in Pittsburgh left the Bengals 3-0, Thurman was arrested for drunken driving that night. Henry, who has been arrested four times, was a passenger in the vehicle but wasn't charged.

    The league extended Thurman's suspension for the rest of the season, and Henry was benched by Lewis for the next game. The league then added a two-game suspension for Henry, who has two court cases pending heading into the offseason.

    Lewis originally hoped that Thurman could become a leader like middle linebacker Ray Lewis in Baltimore. Now, he appears to have written him off.

    Asked if Thurman could be part of the team again, Lewis said, "I don't know that. I don't see it on our horizon."

    Thurman's off-field problems forced the Bengals to rearrange their linebackers and repeatedly switch their defensive lineups. Although the defense improved overall this season, it faded during an 0-3 finish that cost the Bengals (8-8) a chance to make the playoffs.

    Lewis said Tuesday that the defense was one of his biggest disappointments.

    "Defensively, I think the thing we really have to do is develop an identity," Lewis said. "I think if you said what's a disappointment, that's a disappointment. We didn't develop an identity.

    "We had a good start at it, we had a little blip in the middle, and I don't think we finished it off very well. I know...
    -01-02-2007, 10:04 PM
  • Rip32
    Ray Lewis
    by Rip32
    The Ravens are still shopping around middle linebacker Ray Lewis as trade bait, possibly to the Denver Broncos for one of their two offensive tackles, Matt Lepsis or George Foster.
    -- Baltimore Sun
    -03-16-2006, 08:15 AM
  • sosa39rams
    Player Profile: Thaddeus Lewis
    by sosa39rams
    Duke football coach David Cutcliffe is widely regarded as one of the finest quarterback tutors in the country. He’s the man who once provided guidance to future Hall of Fame signal caller Peyton Manning.

    Cutcliffe passed those same lessons on to his latest pupil, Rams rookie Thaddeus Lewis. In his four-year career with the Blue Devils, Lewis went on to set or tie every major passing record in school history.

    And for all of his success, Lewis was trained in a pro style offense more along the lines of the NFL than the spread offenses that run rampant in college football these days.

    In other words, when Lewis signed with the Rams as an undrafted free agent on April 26, he was about as NFL ready as a quarterback can be.

    “It helped me a whole lot,” Lewis said. “I wasn’t fazed at all coming out to these practices because he makes his practices up tempo and fast. The transition was great so that part wasn’t hard at all. It’s just learning the language. The language is different. You have to forget everything you learned in college. Pretty much, the route concepts and running plays are the same. The defenses never change. They add a few things to it but it’s pretty much the same.”

    Make no mistake, for as much preparation as Lewis was able to have for his move to the game’s highest level, there’s only so much you can do. That’s why Lewis came to St. Louis with his eyes and ears wide open and his head on a swivel.

    “It’s demanding more of you on this level than in college,” Lewis said. “As a quarterback, there are a lot of things you need to know as a rookie that you have to learn on the fly. You have to learn pretty quick in college but the transition has been pretty smooth. The coaches have done a great job with us but putting time in off the field also helps.”

    Considering his pedigree and his performance in college, it might come as a surprise that Lewis went undrafted last April.

    While Duke is known for its prowess on the basketball court, Cutcliffe has restored some respectability to the program with the help of Lewis as the cornerstone quarterback.

    From the moment he arrived in Durham as a freshman out of Hialeah Miami Lakes High in Florida, Lewis made his presence felt. He started the final 11 weeks of his true freshman season.

    By the time his four years were complete, Lewis had left a lasting impression on Duke football fans.

    All told, Lewis established or matched 54 schools records including career completions (877), passing yards (10,065) and passing touchdowns (67) while playing in 47 games. A two-time second team All-ACC selection, Lewis was a finalist for the Davey O’Brien Award as a senior when he threw for 3,330 yards and 20 touchdowns. His 10,065 passing yards rank as the second-highest career total in ACC history.

    With numbers like those and the training Lewis had...
    -07-17-2010, 10:20 AM
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