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J. Lewis pleads not guilty to attempted cocaine possession

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  • J. Lewis pleads not guilty to attempted cocaine possession

    Aug. 27, 2004
    SportsLine.com wire reports

    ATLANTA -- Baltimore Ravens running back Jamal Lewis did not appear at his arraignment Friday, but his lawyers entered a not guilty plea on charges in an expanded drug conspiracy indictment.

    Lawyers for Lewis and co-defendant Angelo Jackson showed up 40 minutes before the morning hearing was to begin and asked the court to start early, said Andy Burns, courtroom deputy to U.S. Magistrate Judge Gerrilyn G. Brill. Jackson appeared and pleaded not guilty.

    Lewis, already facing federal drug conspiracy charges issued in February, was hit Aug. 17 with an extra charge of attempting to possess cocaine.

    The charge was included in a superseding indictment, a common move in complicated cases where the government refines its original accusations. Jackson was already facing the attempted cocaine possession charge.

    Lewis, 24, is accused of trying to broker a cocaine deal in the summer of 2000 for Jackson, 26. The two men grew up in the same area of Atlanta. Their trial is set for Nov. 1.


    AP NEWS
    The Associated Press News Service

    Copyright 2004, The Associated Press, All Rights Reserved

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  • Curly Horns
    Celebrity lawyers meet government prosecutors in Lewis case
    by Curly Horns
    HARRY R. WEBER
    Associated Press

    ATLANTA - One side has a team of celebrity lawyers who have defended sports stars and high-profile murder suspects. The other has two government prosecutors who specialize in drug cases.

    Observers expect a dogfight as Baltimore Ravens running back Jamal Lewis and his childhood friend, Angelo Jackson, prepare for trial on federal drug conspiracy charges.

    "It's going to be a lot more about the facts than the number of years in the courtroom," said Kent Alexander, a former U.S. Attorney in Atlanta.

    Lewis, 24, is accused of helping broker a cocaine deal for Jackson during conversations with a government informant during the summer of 2000. Both Lewis and Jackson have pleaded not guilty.

    Lewis' defense team includes Ed Garland, who represented Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis on murder charges and is one of the lawyers for Atlanta Thrashers forward Dany Heatley, who was involved in a car crash that killed a teammate. Heatley has not been charged.

    Another lawyer representing Jamal Lewis is Jerome Froelich, who defended Fred Tokars against charges of money laundering, racketeering and arranging his wife's murder in 1992. Steve Sadow, who defended former Gold Club owner Steve Kaplan in a federal racketeering case, is a lawyer for Lewis co-defendant Jackson.

    "That's an all-star team," said Alexander. "They're all very good."

    On the government's side are prosecutors Mike Brown and Stephanie Elaine Gabay-Smith. Brown has handled numerous drug cases while working in the Atlanta office the last several years after transferring from the U.S. Attorney's office in Miami. Gabay-Smith is a member of the Southeast Drug Task Force.

    Sadow, on vacation in Greece on Thursday, described Brown as a "highly competent, thorough trial attorney." He is "aggressive yet congenial in front of a jury," Sadow said.

    Gabay-Smith is an aggressive prosecutor who has played on the U.S. Attorney's office basketball team, said Alexander, her former boss and the person who hired her. She used to work as a prosecutor in New York City, he said.

    "If she's half as competitive in the courtroom as she is on the basketball court, the government will be well-served" in the Lewis case, Alexander said. "She's got a lot of years of experience."

    Lawyers in the Lewis case continue to seek documents from each other. No trial date has been set.

    Froelich said Thursday there have been no discussions in the Lewis camp about a plea deal.

    "I'm preparing for trial," he said.

    The prosecutors declined through a spokesman to comment.

    Lewis and Jackson, who both grew up in the same area of Atlanta, are charged with conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute five kilograms of cocaine and using...
    -07-10-2004, 11:54 PM
  • DJRamFan
    Ex-Nevada RB gets probation for assault, attempted robbery
    by DJRamFan
    Jan. 26, 2005
    SportsLine.com wire reports

    RENO, Nev. -- A former running back for the Nevada football team was sentenced to five years' probation Tuesday in connection with an incident that occurred in September 2003.

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    Joseph Bwire, 20, who also played at Reno's McQueen High School, pleaded guilty in Washoe County District Court in October to assault with a deadly weapon and attempted burglary.

    He allegedly fired a single shot from a handgun as he tried to flee after a residential burglary.

    The assault charge carries a penalty of up to six years in state prison and up to $5,000 fine. The attempted burglary charge could lead to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

    Both the district attorney's office and the Division of Parole and Probation both urged prison time for Bwire.

    Washoe District Judge Steven R. Kosatch sentenced him to 1-4 years on each count, then suspended the prison term and placed him on probation.

    AP NEWS
    The Associated Press News Service

    Copyright 2004-2005, The Associated Press, All Rights Reserved
    -01-27-2005, 02:32 PM
  • DJRamFan
    Vols DT McDaniel makes plea deal in assault case
    by DJRamFan
    July 28, 2005
    CBS SportsLine.com wire reports




    KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -- Tennessee defensive tackle Tony McDaniel pleaded guilty Thursday to hitting a student in the face during a pickup basketball game in January.

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    McDaniel, suspended since the incident, will be allowed to return to the team, but coach Phillip Fulmer announced that McDaniel will have to sit out the first two games of the season, complete community service, attend anger management counseling and abide by a curfew for the fall semester.

    "He is a good young man that made a bad decision and now has a second chance to move forward. I hope and feel he will take advantage of it," Fulmer said.

    McDaniel made a deal with prosecutors to have the original felony charge reduced to misdemeanor assault. He was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days, but was placed on immediate probation and isn't expected to spend any time in jail.

    Knox County Criminal Court Judge Ray Jenkins told McDaniel that he will remain under supervised probation until he pays restitution to the victim.

    McDaniel was charged with aggravated assault in January and could have faced up to six years if convicted under the felony charge.

    His case also was dealt with by the university, which placed him on indefinite probation. He was suspended for the summer school sessions and is not allowed to enter the student recreation center where the fight took place, school officials said.

    The 6-foot-7, 295-pound McDaniel was accused of hitting Edward Goodrich, a 26-year-old student. Goodrich testified during a hearing in April that the punch broke his face in four places and doctors had to insert a metal plate to treat his injuries.

    McDaniel declined to be interviewed after the hearing. His attorney, Don Bosch, said he was very pleased with the outcome.

    "We appreciate Mr. Goodrich's position and, frankly, the seriousness of his injuries. This is a very serious matter that was unintended by Tony. We're going to make this right with Mr. Goodrich," Bosch said.

    McDaniel, who will be a junior this fall, made his first career start for Tennessee in the Volunteers' 38-7 win over Texas A&M in the Cotton Bowl.

    The defensive tackle is one of 13 Tennessee players who have been either arrested or cited for crimes ranging from aggravated assault to underage drinking since February 2004.

    AP NEWS
    The Associated Press News Service

    Copyright 2004-2005, The Associated Press, All Rights Reserved
    -07-31-2005, 04:06 PM
  • DJRamFan
    Charges dropped, reduced against Vols from party brawl
    by DJRamFan
    Aug. 1, 2005
    CBS SportsLine.com wire reports




    KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -- Prosecutors dropped a felony aggravated assault charge against one Tennessee football player and reduced the charge against another Monday in a case stemming from a fight at a campus party last March.

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    Tennessee defensive end Robert Ayers and linebacker Jerod Mayo, who both redshirted last season as freshmen, were charged with hitting a fellow student when several fights broke out between football players and members of Omega Psi Phi fraternity.

    The charge against Mayo was dismissed after a witness would not cooperate with prosecutors.

    The charge against Ayers was reduced to misdemeanor assault. He pleaded guilty to the lesser charge and now has nearly 12 months to pay court costs and make restitution to the victim. After that, the charge will be erased from his record. The amount of restitution has not yet been determined, but it will not be more than $3,000.

    Aggravated assault is a felony, and sentences could vary from 3 to 15 years in prison.

    In a statement Monday, Phillip Fulmer said that Ayers will have to sit out the first two games of the season, complete community service and anger management counseling and abide by a curfew during the fall semester.

    Ayers also was suspended from summer school and placed on indefinite probation by the university, Fulmer said.

    Mayo was not suspended from the team.

    "I was glad to see Jerod Mayo cleared of any issues," Fulmer said.

    AP NEWS
    The Associated Press News Service

    Copyright 2004-2005, The Associated Press, All Rights Reserved
    -08-02-2005, 02:35 PM
  • Bruce=GOAT
    Mike Tyson facing possible prison time again
    by Bruce=GOAT
    Former heavyweight champ faces jail on drug charges
    Associated Press

    PHOENIX -- Former heavyweight champ Mike Tyson was charged Wednesday with drug possession and driving under the influence of drugs, and the Maricopa County prosecutor says he wants to send him to prison.

    "He has run out of second chances, at least in my book," attorney Andrew Thomas said in a news conference.

    Tyson, 40, was charged with two felonies for drug possession and two misdemeanor counts of driving under the influence of drugs. If convicted of all four charges, he could be sentenced to between 2 and 7 years.

    The charges stem from his arrest Friday in Scottsdale, where Tyson was pulled over after leaving a nightclub. An officer found bags of cocaine in his back pocket and another in a package of cigarettes in his car, according to court records.

    Tyson's criminal attorney, Thomas Marlow, didn't return phone calls Wednesday from The Associated Press.

    Tyson's arrest was the latest in a string of run-ins with the law, dating back more than a decade.

    In 1992, Tyson was convicted of rape in Indiana. Six years later, the former boxing champ pleaded no contest to misdemeanor assault charges in Maryland.

    Thomas said Tyson's record makes him eligible for prison time instead of Arizona's drug treatment programs for nonviolent offenders.

    "I don't take any pleasure out of doing this," Thomas said. "A week ago, my kids and I were watching Rocky Balboa in the movie theater, and we saw Mike Tyson make a cameo appearance in the movie, and now here we are and he's looking at going back to prison."

    Tyson became the youngest heavyweight champion in history in 1986, when at 20 he knocked out Trevor Berbick. Four years later he was knocked out by James "Buster" Douglas. By 1997, Tyson's career hit its low point when he bit Evander Holyfield's ear during a fight.

    Tyson recently got back in the ring for a series of four-round exhibitions. When announcing the world tour, Tyson told reporters he was deep in debt and wondered if people would still pay to watch him fight.

    On Friday, Tyson was released without bond after a brief court appearance. He didn't make any comment to reporters, except to offer a greeting.

    Thomas said Tyson should be back in court for a preliminary hearing within the next two weeks.

    The car Tyson was driving was spotted weaving and nearly struck a police SUV after he ran a stop sign early Friday, according to a police probable cause statement filed in court. During the stop, police said they saw him trying to wipe a white powder off the console of his car.

    No alcohol was detected in his system. But Thomas said Tyson failed a sobriety test and officers searching his vehicle found three bags that later tested positive...
    -01-23-2007, 04:39 AM
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