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Warner's Rise Inspirational, Warner's Fall Perplexing

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  • Warner's Rise Inspirational, Warner's Fall Perplexing

    By ClanRam's Don Ackerman
    Monday, 31 May, 2004

    I've watched the Kurt Warner story since day 1. I still remember the disappointment I felt when the Rams lost their recently signed quarterback Trent Green to injury in the preseason against San Diego. I also remember Kurt Warner holding up the Lombardi trophy as he lead his team in Super Bowl XXXIV. Now Kurt's all but gone.

    Before Trent Green went down, it was supposed to be redemption for Rams fans. After years of struggling, The Rams went out and signed a highly regarded quarterback from the Washington Redskins. Green, our new quarterback, was starting a new era in Saint Louis Rams football. Scratch that, the Rams were starting a new era with a new quarterback. But that quarterback was not Trent Green. It was Kurt Warner. With the Kurt Warner era ending today or tomorrow, I can't help but wonder.

    Kurt Warner's rise was a phoenix's birth. From the fire of devastation in Trent Green's injury, Kurt Warner rose from the ashes, entered the NFL, and found his place in history. His rise to glory, Super Bowls, and Most Valuable Player trophies seem very unlikely. Kurt's Cinderella story is the stuff of Hollywood. It's an inspirational tale that everyone wants to tell their grandchildren. It's that never-give-up mantra that we all need to remember when we are down. It's dare I say Biblical in how faith was rewarded. And as near impossible as that story starts, the come-from-nowhere story actually seems probable when compared to Kurt Warner's fall.

    As suddenly as it began, the Kurt Warner story fizzled out. But the most perplexing part of Kurt's quick fade from the Ram's starting quarterback job is not as shocking as how it happened.

    The rise was improbable. After all, Kurt's rise to fame did not occur as a 24-year old just out of college. Kurt was older, more experienced, and had played Arena Football and NFL Europe football. He was the player trying to break through. A man of strong spiritual belief, Kurt did the Lord's will and tried, tried, tried. So really, it's no surprise that his faith was rewarded.

    But how he's handled the fall is really the story that boggles the mind. It's confusing to hear Kurt talk about his faith becoming a reason for his departure from the starting job in Saint Louis (happened in February, 2004). When that news became public, coach Mike Martz was angry and Kurt retracted his story. How does this happen? Kurt's reaction seems inconsistent with his publicly-shared religious faith. What's going on, Kurt?

    Honestly, the Kurt Warner story has become a bad reality television show. And like most TV, we only hear part of the story.

    Because of that, I'm not sure what to think. The most surprising thing for me is Kurt's attitude. With his strong religious beliefs, I'd expect Kurt to hand off what happens to God. Personally, that may be how he rose to such great heights. He just followed his heart and let God do the rest. I think we have all heard that when times get tough, you need to step back and let God handle things. When Trent Green went down, Kurt stepped in and rode the wave.

    Oddly enough, I don't see Kurt doing that now. He certainly has handled the situation well most of the time. Like I said before, he has had lapses. Perhaps that is because it's hard to be perfect all the time. It's hard to be "on" 24 days a week, 7 days a week. In any case, his discussions of faith being a problem in Houston, Texas seem out of place. It just doesn't seem like Kurt to put blame and faith in one sentence.

    Also, Kurt's potential injuries give me pause. Everything said portrays Kurt as healthy. But something is causing Kurt to become prone to fumbling away football games. In his most recent starts, Kurt has been targeted by defenses because he will turn over the ball. Though spoken words say he's fine, we all know that's not completely true. Something is there.

    Again, I'm perplexed. Kurt has accomplished so much. He has won some trophies but a man of faith would never be concerned about such things. He is able to care for his family and his success has undoubtedly earned him enough money to care for his family for life. His First Things First Foundation continues to provide great things for children. I know he loves playing football but again, I don't see him handing it off to God in his backfield. I almost expect Kurt to say something like "I have done so much and been able to help so many people. I'm thankful for the opportunity I have in Saint Louis and will continue to do my best to help this team." Doing the best for the team is not having your wife call into talk shows (September, 2003)(I don't fault her for a moment for saying what anyone supporting someone else would say) but includes enjoying what you have and trying to more but without being a distraction.

    But when I hear Kurt speak, I almost expect him to say thank you and that he's willing to go whereever God asks him to go. If that's another football team, great. After all, it's an opportunity to branch out. It's a chance for another city to share in Kurt Warner's giving. Why don't we hear that from Kurt?

    Now, the Kurt Warner era seems to be drawing to an end. The perplexing part for me, is the answer to the question why?

    Good luck Kurt whereever you go. I will always treasure your time in Saint Louis and what you did for the Saint Louis Rams.

    Ram on,
    Don
    Attached Files

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    Keeping the Rams Nation Talking

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  • RamDez
    Warner's Rise Inspirational, Warner's Fall Perplexing
    by RamDez
    By ClanRam's Don Ackerman

    I've watched the Kurt Warner story since day 1. I still remember the disappointment I felt when the Rams lost their recently signed quarterback Trent Green to injury in the preseason against San Diego. I also remember Kurt Warner holding up the Lombardi trophy as he lead his team in Super Bowl XXXIV. Now Kurt's all but gone.

    Before Trent Green went down, it was supposed to be redemption for Rams fans. After years of struggling, The Rams went out and signed a highly regarded quarterback from the Washington Redskins. Green, our new quarterback, was starting a new era in Saint Louis Rams football. Scratch that, the Rams were starting a new era with a new quarterback. But that quarterback was not Trent Green. It was Kurt Warner. With the Kurt Warner era ending today or tomorrow, I can't help but wonder.

    Kurt Warner's rise was a phoenix's birth. From the fire of devastation in Trent Green's injury, Kurt Warner rose from the ashes, entered the NFL, and found his place in history. His rise to glory, Super Bowls, and Most Valuable Player trophies seem very unlikely. Kurt's Cinderella story is the stuff of Hollywood. It's an inspirational tale that everyone wants to tell their grandchildren. It's that never-give-up mantra that we all need to remember when we are down. It's dare I say Biblical in how faith was rewarded. And as near impossible as that story starts, the come-from-nowhere story actually seems probable when compared to Kurt Warner's fall.

    As suddenly as it began, the Kurt Warner story fizzled out. But the most perplexing part of Kurt's quick fade from the Ram's starting quarterback job is not as shocking as how it happened.

    The rise was improbable. After all, Kurt's rise to fame did not occur as a 24-year old just out of college. Kurt was older, more experienced, and had played Arena Football and NFL Europe football. He was the player trying to break through. A man of strong spiritual belief, Kurt did the Lord's will and tried, tried, tried. So really, it's no surprise that his faith was rewarded.

    But how he's handled the fall is really the story that boggles the mind. It's confusing to hear Kurt talk about his faith becoming a reason for his departure from the starting job in Saint Louis (happened in February, 2004). When that news became public, coach Mike Martz was angry and Kurt retracted his story. How does this happen? Kurt's reaction seems inconsistent with his publicly-shared religious faith. What's going on, Kurt?

    Honestly, the Kurt Warner story has become a bad reality television show. And like most TV, we only hear part of the story.

    Because of that, I'm not sure what to think. The most surprising thing for me is Kurt's attitude. With his strong religious beliefs, I'd expect Kurt to hand off what happens to God. Personally, that may be how he rose to such great heights. He just followed his...
    -06-03-2004, 01:00 AM
  • RamDez
    Kurt Warner – A Fond Farewell To A Great Man
    by RamDez
    Kurt Warner – A Fond Farewell To A Great Man
    By Barry Waller
    June 3rd, 2004

    There are times when covering an NFL team that even the biggest fan
    might find to be more work than enjoyment. Dealing with professional athletes
    is a real pain at times, and trying to give fans the true story when so many rumors have sent them into so many directions is even worse. While there are times that the words fly out of a writer’s mind onto the pages he is composing, there are others when sitting down and rehashing the facts to tell a tale is almost excruciating. If I am doing a column twenty years from now, I probably won’t have had to labor over a story as much as this one.

    Oh, sure, nobody died, no beloved sports figure met his maker far too young on the day after Memorial Day, which is the toughest stuff to cover from a personal side; but in a lot of ways, it seems like something truly died for Ramsnation when the team released Kurt Warner. When the long predicted move was made official this past Wednesday however, there was no outcry from Rams fans, no wail of sorrow at a tragic event. Not surprisingly, Warner himself left town with the same class and good feelings that are his trademark.

    Like a parent, spouse, or child who has seen a loved one slowly slip away due to illness, those of us who will never forget what #13 meant to a team and a city have little emotion left to give as the irreversible end finally came. They have gone through the same predictable emotions of anger, denial, bargaining, and depression, then a numb acceptance of our fate, as cancer victims, ever since Kurt Warner began showing he was human after all. Ironically, the most incredible and improbable feel good story in NFL history involved a man who embodies everything decent about the human animal, despite his immortal like play when at his best.

    As the negative stories and feelings about Warner as the Rams quarterback appeared, they acted upon his legacy like tumors on bodily organs, some spreading and mutating to other areas. We may never know how the negative vibes played a part in what so quickly turned a two time MVP passer into a backup. If Warner shines with the Giants, another team needing the kind of miracle that Warner gave Rams fans and the world in 1999, maybe it will provide a bit of a clue.

    I was at Warner’s last start, in the Meadowlands against those same Giants, and as painful as it was having to suffer with him on that day, and suffer the slings and arrows of Giants fans during and following the game, I feel blessed that I got to see as much as I could of Kurt Warner in person. It was that personal contact over the past six seasons that makes his inexplicable fall from grace so distressing.

    In the NFL, everyone knows the salary cap, and other factors makes it nearly impossible to keep players for entire careers, something Rams fans have had to...
    -06-06-2004, 04:38 AM
  • Varg6
    My experience with Kurt Warner...
    by Varg6
    Hey guys, so I told you guys about a week ago that I'd give you more details on what I meant by saying that I hung out with Kurt Warner...

    I was invited to a flag football tournament out in Arizona. A bunch of NFL guys come out for the event (it's sponsored by Kurt Warner at the Arizona Cardinals' training facility; they had guys like Michael Irvin, Joe Flacco, Andy Dalton, Steve Young, Brock Osweiler, and more) and, essentially, play QB for the teams. There were about six or eight teams, I'm not exactly sure how many, but all of them were basically sports supplement companies. I was lucky enough to be a part of one of my good friend's team. We wound up getting Andy Dalton for our QB. He's a very nice guy, laid back, down to Earth. I, of course, asked him about Sam Bradford. He said, like most people say, that he thinks he's pretty good and they just need to get him some weapons. Fair enough.

    I briefly met with Kurt Warner, and I told him what a huge fan I am of him and the Rams. He said something to the effect of "oh that's pretty cool man." He wasn't necessarily thrilled or anything, but I also know he was trying to run an event and was pretty overwhelmed.

    And let me tell you something about Kurt. Really nice guy off the field. But on the field, (or with any competitive thing he does, for that matter) he's always trying to win. No matter what it is, he'll get mad if he's not winning! But that's not really a bad thing. He's fiery and passionate. It's a good thing.

    I'd say out of all the guys there, Irvin was probably the most outgoing and friendly. Everyone there was pretty cool though and it was a great experience. Caught a few TDs from Andy (wished it was from Kurt or, maybe next year, Sammy) so I felt good about that!

    Here's a pic of me and Kurt.

    ImageShack® - Online Photo and Video Hosting
    -03-17-2013, 10:08 AM
  • r8rh8rmike
    Kurt Warner Ends His Storybook Career
    by r8rh8rmike
    Kurt Warner ends his storybook career

    By Jim Thomas
    ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
    01/30/2010


    He walked into the room in typical Kurt Warner style, with humility in his heart and a Bible in his hand. And then directly and with clarity announced what everyone expected: that he was retiring after 12 storybook seasons in the NFL.

    In no way did he seem conflicted about his decision. The only time he got emotional was after he brought wife Brenda and their seven children onstage at Friday's news conference in Tempe, Ariz.

    The MVP awards, the Super Bowls, the amazing statistics will always be associated with Warner. But that's not really what Warner wants as his legacy.

    "The one thing that I always want to leave people with ... is that anything is possible," Warner said. "I think that's one of the reasons that God's placed me up here and allowed me to do what I do. To encourage people out there that although sometimes it doesn't look really bright, and there's moments you want to give up ... that anything's possible.

    "I hope that when people think back on my career ... that that's what they remember more than anything else. Not the way I threw the football. Not particular games that I won. That they remember that here's a guy that believed, that worked hard, and although things didn't always go in his favor, he continued to press through. And with his faith in himself and with his faith in God, he was able to accomplish great things. That's what I want everybody to remember."

    How could we ever forget?

    From grocery store clerk in Iowa to triggerman for the Greatest Show on Turf. It was a made-for-TV movie if ever there was one. But then came the wrenching loss to New England in Warner's second Super Bowl. Injuries. The Brenda-gate controversies with Mike Martz.

    After his unceremonious release by the Rams following the 2003 season, Warner seemed lost in the wilderness career-wise with the New York Giants, and initially, with the Arizona Cardinals.

    "After leaving the Giants, it looked like that was probably it," current Rams general manager Billy Devaney said. "There were questions about him, about his thumb. And then he puts on the glove (on his throwing hand for the 2007 season)."

    And suddenly, it was vintage Warner once again, and for the second time in his career he took a woebegone franchise to the Super Bowl. Call it the rise and fall — and rise again — of Warner.

    "It's absolutely one of the most amazing stories in sports," said Charley Armey, Rams GM during most of Warner's six-year stay in St. Louis. "It probably never happens again in our lifetime."

    "It's an unbelievable story," said Dick Vermeil, head coach of the Rams' Super Bowl championship team. "No quarterback...
    -01-30-2010, 02:10 PM
  • r8rh8rmike
    Bernie: Kurt Warner Writes His Own Ending
    by r8rh8rmike
    Kurt Warner writes his own ending

    Sports Columnist Bernie Miklasz
    ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
    01/30/2010


    Ten years ago today, the Rams won the Super Bowl. The winning touchdown pass was a 73-yard dream from Kurt Warner to Isaac Bruce that floated above the reach of the Tennessee Titans and straight into history. It was magic. One flick of Warner's right wrist, and all of those sad, sorry, losing Sundays disappeared.

    Friday afternoon, Kurt Warner said goodbye as a player. At a news conference in Arizona, No. 13 announced his retirement after 12 NFL seasons and one of the most unusual and improbable careers in the history of American sports.

    Watching it, I wanted to be sad. I wanted to turn back the clock. I wanted to make the last few seasons of Rams football go away, just as Warner and his teammates made all of those bad memories go away in 1999.

    I can't believe it's been 10 years since the 1999 season, and the rollout of "The Greatest Show on Turf," Warner to Bruce, Mike Jones and "The Tackle," and the triumph of Super Bowl XXXIV.


    But as I watched Warner explain his decision to move into another phase of his life, the melancholy lifted. Let's realize how fortunate he is. Warner leaves with his health intact to savor a fulfilling life with Brenda and their seven children. Warner exits the stage as a winner, having led futile franchises in St. Louis and Arizona to three Super Bowl trips.

    Warner departs on his terms. He isn't broken down. His skills haven't deteriorated. He didn't stay too long. Warner wasn't an aging Willie Mays losing a fly ball in the sun in 1973. He wasn't a diminished Muhammad Ali, getting battered by Larry Holmes. He wasn't Michael Jordan, fading into irrelevance in the odd colors of the Washington Wizards. He wasn't John Unitas, limping around as a San Diego Charger.

    How many star athletes know when to leave on time? Not many. A list of those who managed to pull it off includes Barry Sanders, Jim Brown, Sandy Koufax, Larry Bird, Ted Williams, Ozzie Smith. Well, place Warner's name among them.

    And that's why I'm happy for Warner. He won. In a few years, he went from tossing cans of greenbeans to co-workers on the overnight shift at the Hy-Vee store to throwing the TD pass that won a Super Bowl. How many athletes realize their wildest dreams? How many athletes can retire knowing that they enhanced their sport? Or that they inspired millions of fans through their display of perseverance and personal character?

    "I wanted people to remember that anything is possible," Warner said at his news conference. "With my story, and the fact that it took me so long to get here, I know there are a lot of people that gravitate to that part of it. That understand the struggles. That ... understand when it takes a little bit longer...
    -01-30-2010, 02:15 PM
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