Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

NFl Stadiums graded - guess who is last

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • NFl Stadiums graded - guess who is last

    LAMBEAU FIELD
    GREEN BAY, WISCONSIN
    GREEN BAY PACKERS
    The great tailgating.....the friendliness of the people.....and the most classic of all NFL
    venues is to be found here in Green Bay. Throw in a nine figure upgrade and renovation
    of this hallowed ground and you have the elite venue of the National Football League. The
    seating bowl remains as it has been for decades....and the rest has been significantly
    improved. What was once your very basic steel and concrete concourse has been turned
    into a virtual living history of one of the sports' most renowned franchises with photos and
    murals of the great moments and so much more....can we come back, PLEASE!!



    HEINZ FIELD
    PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA
    PITTSBURGH STEELERS
    Put a stadium downtown, add all the modern touches, a great skyline view, a menu with
    all the local dishes, awesome tailgating and great fans who know their football legacy,
    and you will find all that and more in Pittsburgh!The Coca-Cola Great Hall is easily the
    finest concourse in the NFL. Tickets are hard to come by. We know why!





    RAYMOND JAMES STADIUM
    TAMPA, FLORIDA
    TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS
    Another one of the generation of new NFL stadiums, this one has the combination of all
    the right things - comfortable seats with great views, two huge crystal clear jumbotrons,
    modern fan amenities, great tailgating, rabid fans who pack the place and great Florida
    weather. But ahhhhh - that pirate ship! This is the signature element of the building and
    the pirate theme dominates the entire football experience.



    RELIANT STADIUM
    HOUSTON, TEXAS
    HOUSTON TEXANS
    The first in the NFL retractable roof. This is a big, big stadium which boasts superior
    design, great attention to public spaces, superb tailgating and great fans who deservedly
    belong back in the ranks of NFL cities.





    M&T BANK STADIUM
    BALTIMORE, MARYLAND
    BALTIMORE RAVENS
    Set in the beautiful downtown Inner Harbor area, this beautiful stadium perfectly
    compliments its sister stadium next door, Camden Yards. Tailgating is abundant here,
    even in a downtown setting. The highlight of the inside seating area is not one but two
    HUGE smartvision boards dominating each end zone. Fan amenities, merchandise and
    food are plentiful in wide, colorful concourses. All in all a showcase to modern NFL
    football!



    LINCOLN FINANCIAL FIELD
    PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA
    PHILADELPHIA EAGLES
    Is anyone shedding a tear for the demise of the Vet? No way! Lincoln Financial Field has
    all the ambience of a great gathering spot, kind of like a combination of a busy train
    station and your neighborhood pub. All the amenities you would want - great seating bowl
    with awesome sightlines, scoreboards and LED boards. Nice entrance pavilion at the
    "Head House" in the north end, and Phillyfan really packs this place to cheer on their
    Eagles.





    QWEST FIELD
    SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
    SEATTLE SEAHAWKS
    A downtown setting doesn't allow much in the way of tailgating here. But there are many
    other sights and sounds to be experienced at one of the NFL's newest gems - whether it
    be walking the warning track at nearby Safeco Field, the impressive view of downtown
    from the south end zone. And gosh! What great architecture in that distinct arched roof.
    Qwest Field is a great venue....now if only they could get a real team to play there!!!



    GILLETTE STADIUM
    FOXBORO, MASSACHUSETTS
    NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS
    Is this heaven? No its Foxboro. Yet don't tell that to the Patriots fans who sat in miserable
    Foxboro Stadium for decades, and have now been rewarded with a new venue and a
    Super Bowl trophy. End zone lighthouse and arched bridge are the signature elements to
    a gorgeous and modern venue with all the amenities and fan comforts.





    PAUL BROWN STADIUM
    CINCINNATI, OHIO
    CINCINNATI BENGALS
    This place opened in 2000 and it is quite a jewel. With Daktronics LED overlooking the
    sidelines, two asymmetrical jumbotrons at each end and a seating area design that is
    eye-popping and jaw-dropping we would have to say that this place is our favorite as far
    as design is concerned. With a few tons of orange and black paint and brighter
    concourses this place would probably earn a spot on top on our list.



    SOLDIER FIELD
    CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
    CHICAGO BEARS
    Set in the city's stunning and historic lakefront Park District, Soldier Field has new life
    thanks to a $600MM renovation. Wider concourses? Not really. More restrooms? Umm..
    where? But the colonnades work well with the new design, and the building pays great
    homage to those who served our country. Still enough in terms of seating bowl amenities
    to earn a high spot on the list.





    EDWARD JONES DOME
    ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
    ST. LOUIS RAMS
    It doesn't matter if you believe that domed stadiums are a sure sign of the Apocalypse,
    trust us when we say you will enjoy the Edward Jones Dome experience. This is our
    favorite domed NFL stadium by far with its small yet grand entrances at each of the four
    corners of the building and wide concourses that widen at points where there are
    concession stands. This building also offers sweeping views of downtown St. Louis
    including that unfinished McDonald's sign on the banks of the Mississippi. So kick back,
    have a couple of Bud Lights (WHASSUUUP!!!) and watch the Rams light up the
    scoreboard.



    FORD FIELD
    DETROIT, MICHIGAN
    DETROIT LIONS
    The old Hudson's Warehouse is built right into the stadium, and that makes downtown
    Detroit's newest jewel a unique football experience. Little tailgating or pregame action a
    minus, but stunning indoor seating bowl flooded with natural light makes for one of the
    best of the NFL's domed stadiums.





    NETWORK ASSOCIATES COLISEUM
    OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA
    OAKLAND RAIDERS (RAIDERFAN)
    Not a commentary on the stadium (so,so at best) but a tribute to the wildest and zaniest
    fans we have seen to date and no one comes close. Here it is not enough just to show up
    with a Rich Gannon jersey and a Raiders cap. In order to qualify as RAIDERFAN you must
    dress and behave in a style that makes one appear to be something other than human.
    Silver and Black color attire required of course and if you even think of wearing colors of
    the visiting team in the stadium please enter at your own risk.
    P.S. Black Hole is in, Dawg Pound is out!



    INVESCO FIELD AT MILE HIGH
    DENVER, COLORADO
    DENVER BRONCOS
    This modern and futuristic stadium looks like something out of "The Jetsons". Three
    massive video boards and a Broncos logo interwoven into the seats makes for one of the
    nicest seating bowls in the NFL. Food choices a plenty, and Denver fans pack this place
    game in and game out. If you have a ticket, don't be a no-show here, you will get boooed
    by the fans who did.





    ARROWHEAD STADIUM
    KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI
    KANSAS CITY CHIEFS
    Super atmosphere inside and out. A magnificent 30 year old facility with no signs of
    slowing down. Home games at Arrowhead are probably the biggest parties in the
    Midwest!! Get your tix and head on out here....



    GIANTS STADIUM
    EAST RUTHERFORD, NEW JERSEY
    NEW YORK GIANTS
    The game meant nothing and plenty of fans paid not to see the game, but the least we
    could do is award the same rating we gave to the Jets. Michael Strahan - new sack leader
    made the day!





    TITANS COLISEUM
    NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
    TENNESSEE TITANS
    Deserves more than a three, however....MUSIC CITY MIRACLE.... 'nuff said!!! A wonderful,
    bustling downtown to boot, even if you hate country music.



    CLEVELAND BROWNS STADIUM
    CLEVELAND, OHIO
    CLEVELAND BROWNS
    Lakefront setting on the site of the old Cleveland Stadium, they tried to mimic the venue of
    their hated rivals the Ravens... but amenity for amenity, this place falls a bit short.





    METRODOME
    MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA
    MINNESOTA VIKINGS
    Great fans inside, tailgating not allowed in some spots outside ($30 parking here and
    there). When nature calls, brace yourself for some of the longest lines anywhere....



    PRO PLAYER STADIUM
    MIAMI, FLORIDA
    MIAMI DOLPHINS
    Pretty nice facility with warm weather to boot, and the history of this proud football team
    can be seen throughout the place. Most tailgates here sport canopies to provide some
    shade. That Dolphins/Oilers fight song they constantly play is so totally lame!



    GEORGIA DOME
    ATLANTA, GEORGIA
    ATLANTA FALCONS
    One of the nicer domes we've seen. Easy access via MARTA subway and close to
    downtown attractions. Unlike Minnesota, not much of an atmosphere, however.





    TEXAS STADIUM
    IRVING, TEXAS
    DALLAS COWBOYS
    Hallowed home of America's team, this venue is getting on in years but remains extremely
    functional. Mr. Jones, you DON'T need a new yard, but you may want to tell the fans to
    show up by halftime!!!



    GIANTS STADIUM
    EAST RUTHERFORD, NEW JERSEY
    NEW YORK JETS
    Great fans, if you are rooting for the J-E-T-S JETS JETS JETS!!! If not, beware. A lady in the
    section next to us showed off her wares for most of the game, and that helped us forget
    the Bills debacle on the field!!



    CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA
    CAROLINA PANTHERS
    Located in a downtown setting, the most dramatic feature of this venue is the fortress like
    appearance and the statues of panthers guarding the arched entrances on each side.





    SUPERDOME
    NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA
    NEW ORLEANS SAINTS
    The local cajun culture makes it way into this building, from the clap along blues music to
    the jambalaya and alligator sausages on the menu. Electric football atmosphere in a big
    stadium, and all in one of America's greatest cities.



    RALPH WILSON STADIUM
    ORCHARD PARK, NEW YORK
    BUFFALO BILLS
    One of the NFL's absolute best tailgate scenes here in Buffalo, but not enough was done
    to upgrade this place when "The Ralph" was renovated after the '98 season.





    FEDEX FIELD
    LANDOVER, MARYLAND
    WASHINGTON REDSKINS
    Whether it's tailgating or the game experience, the whole package here is way too
    corporate, as if they forgot what an actual football game should be like. Tickets, parking,
    concessions, souvenirs very expensive.



    QUALCOMM STADIUM
    SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA
    SAN DIEGO CHARGERS
    Getting on in years and doesn't have the best of sightlines. Yet almost every amenity can
    be found here, and with the nice weather this is certainly a nice place to see a game.
    PS...you gotta try the fish tacos here.





    ALLTEL STADIUM
    JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
    JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS
    Renovated for the Jags and did a so-so job. The place has plenty of college football
    history to boot. Downtown's Jacksonville Landing a short walk away - worth checking out.



    RCA DOME
    INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA
    INDIANAPOLIS COLTS
    Get fans in, shove 'em a dog and a beer as they watch the game and get 'em home. Nice
    downtown district going up around it. Worth a look for a big game. And an exciting and
    vibrant downtown entertainment and convention district right there.





    SUN DEVIL STADIUM
    TEMPE, ARIZONA
    ARIZONA CARDINALS
    One star means stay in the lot and tailgate! This aspect of a Cardinals football game is
    definitely the best part of the day. Must give plenty of love to the small but boisterous band
    of Cardinal fans who come here despite total lack of success on the field.



    SAN FRANCISCO STADIUM AT CANDLESTICK POINT
    SAN BRUNO, CALIFORNIA
    SAN FRANCISCO 4 9 E R S :bored:
    Narrow concourses, awful sightlines, and a building that has little or no mention of the
    legendary players and teams that played here. The smell of garlic fries hang everywhere/

    __________________________________________________________
    Keeping the Rams Nation Talking

  • #2
    Re: NFl Stadiums graded - guess who is last

    Originally posted by RamDez
    SAN FRANCISCO STADIUM AT CANDLESTICK POINT...and a building that has little or no mention of the legendary players and teams that played here.
    Maybe they need a few photos of some of those great players. I can loan them Crazy Legs, Gabriel, Youngblood, Dickerson and Warner. Anyone else want to help?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: NFl Stadiums graded - guess who is last

      Dez

      You sure have been to a lot of stadiums

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: NFl Stadiums graded - guess who is last

        Candlestick does suck. Crappy weather and dumbass fans. :redface:
        The Q, well you really must try the fish tacos, and I can see my condo from the cheap seats behind the east end zone.
        The Jones Dome; It was a great expirenece the first time I went and hopefully it will be enhanced during the bash.
        JUST WIN ONE FOR THE FANS
        :ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram::ram:

        "HIT HARD, HIT FAST, AND HIT OFTEN"
        Adm. William "Bull" Halsey

        Comment

        Related Topics

        Collapse

        • RamWraith
          New venues put city on notice for keeping Rams
          by RamWraith
          By Bill Coats
          ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
          05/30/2008


          If St. Louis intends to meet its lease agreement by providing the Rams with a venue that ranks in the top 25 percent of the NFL by 2015, the city and the taxpayers must commit to building a state-of-the-art stadium. One in which the cost could hit 10 figures.

          So says Convention and Visitors Commission Chairman Dan Dierdorf publicly, as do several other principals privately.

          The NFL stadiums under construction in Indianapolis; Arlington, Texas; and East Rutherford, N.J., are "going to be the cream of the crop, and they're going to be no more than five or six years old" by 2015, Dierdorf said. "What do you do to a 20-year-old building to make it the equal of a brand-new $1 billion stadium?"

          In 1995, the $281 million downtown dome now known as the Edward Jones Dome was at the cutting edge of stadium technology, as well as an integral part of a new convention center. Today, it's rapidly becoming antiquated in an era of new stadiums around the league.

          The dome is undergoing $30 million in upgrades, including new video boards and an as-yet-undetermined way of getting more sunlight into the building. Those slightly tardy improvements will satisfy requirements to keep the dome in the top tier at the first 10-year segment of the 30-year lease.

          Still, it appears that no amount of renovation, no matter how extravagant and expensive, could turn the dome into one of the top eight stadiums in the 32-team league by 2015, the 20th anniversary. If it isn't, the lease will be broken and the team will be free to consider moving.

          That issue has gained new traction since the death in January of team owner Georgia Frontiere. Her son, Chip Rosenbloom, a Hollywood filmmaker, is the Rams' new managing partner and has vowed to keep the team here. Still, he acknowledged recently that he has "been approached by several people" inquiring about the team's availability.

          OUT WITH OLD, IN WITH NEW

          The newest NFL venues now under construction will be the 18th, 19th and 20th stadiums built since the Rams moved here from Los Angeles in '95. Several other stadiums have undergone significant renovation, some costing hundreds of millions of dollars, during that span.

          "I don't think anybody could've imagined that the boom in stadium development would've happened," said Bob Wallace, the Rams' executive vice president and general counsel. "And you have to also remember that this stadium was designed in 1987, eight years before it was (completed). So it's 21 years old in terms of technology and innovation."

          When the new stadiums go up, decisions must be made as to what happens with the old ones. In Indianapolis, the RCA Dome will be torn down and the space used to expand the city's convention center....
          -05-30-2008, 11:59 AM
        • Guest's Avatar
          Edward jones outdated??
          by Guest
          Caught this article on nfl.com thought it was interesting...


          The first NFL game I covered was at the Edward Jones Dome, the Minnesota Vikings versus the host St. Louis Rams, the 2000 playoffs. Back then, it was known as the TWA Dome, and man, it was loud. One of the newest stadiums in the league, opened in 1995, it was designed to maximize walls of noise stacked like bricks, a raving loony bin of overdubbed screams and claps and stomps. Best home-field advantage in the league, it was called.
          The Ed still is a new stadium, but not new enough, not by NFL standards. Next year, it'll rank in the oldest one-third of NFL stadiums. The boom of new venues has turned a building that was supposed to last 30 years into one that needed $30 million in renovations this past offseason. With a lease that states the Rams must be in the league's upper 25 percent in stadium revenue or they can opt out, it's no secret the Rams' eyes are roaming.

          A new home, with more and bigger luxury boxes, more club seats and more concessions -- similar to what the Dallas Cowboys, Washington Redskins, New York Jets and New York Giants enjoy -- might be the only way to keep the team in St. Louis.

          Unlike old stadiums that underwent face-lifts, like Lambeau Field and Soldier Field, the Ed is so new it's not worth saving.

          "There's this disposability that's part of our consumer culture that seems particularly bizarre when you're talking about stadiums," says Oregon State English professor Michael Oriard, who played for the Kansas City Chiefs in the '70s and recently wrote "Brand NFL: Making and Selling America's Favorite Sport."

          "There's something perverse about making so much money and needing even more yet."

          So how does a stadium transform in nine years from the toughest place to play to outdated? Football doesn't change. The field's dimensions remain the same. Games still last 60 minutes. So to squeeze more money from football, owners change the structures that surround it. And when you have the Cowboys collecting $327 million last year, compared to the Rams' $206 million and the Vikings' $195 million, the new breed of NFL owners -- many of whom manage teams daily -- want spectacular venues.

          Things used to be different. The league's first owners, guys like Art Rooney and George Halas, were not billionaires. A franchise was a long-term investment. Later came richer men, like Buffalo Bills owner Ralph Wilson, Tennessee Titans owner Bud Adams and former Chiefs owner Lamar Hunt, who owned teams but made their real money elsewhere. Dallas' Jerry Jones and Washington's Dan Snyder have made trendy the notion that football is an endless daily revenue stream.

          "Owning a team is no longer a mom-and-pop operation, and it's no longer a rich playboy operation," Oriard says. "It's for capitalists."

          Those capitalists are...
          -10-12-2009, 09:55 PM
        • MauiRam
          How to guarantee the Rams a new stadium ..
          by MauiRam
          This is post is from another forum, however, I thought it an interesting concept, and worthy of discussion here .. Av and GC, perhaps you might weigh in on whether "collusion charges" would have any merit in this type of situation with regard to the Giants.


          Author: Playmaker
          Posted: Fri Jun 04

          In today's tough economic times, the last thing tax payers want to do is fund a new stadium for their home team. Especially when there isn't anything structurally wrong with the current stadium. That is why I think we have seen the last of the publicly funded professional sport stadiums being built.

          If you look across the NFL, there are several NFL franchises that have been trying for years to get new stadiums. San Francisco, Oakland, San Diego and Minnesota have had several proposals for publicly funded stadium proposals shot down in recent years. New Orleans needs a new stadium, but the state of Louisiana and the city of New Orleans are still trying to get over the financial hit of Hurricane Katrina and now the oil disaster that has hit the Gulf of Mexico. St. Louis and Atlanta are approaching the end of their leases at the Georgia and Edward Jones Domes.

          With New York receiving the Super Bowl in 2014, we may be entering a new era in the NFL. The new Giants Stadium cost an estimated $1.6 billion dollars to build. Part of that came from tax levys voted on by the cities of East Rutherford New Jersey and New York City along with the states of New Jersey and New York. The new Giants Stadium received 300 million dollars in grants from the NFL in 2006 to help with the building of the new stadium.

          By giving New York a Super Bowl, the NFL has opened themselves up to collusion charges by any NFL city who is waiting on a new stadium and/or been turned down to host a Super Bowl.


          The Super Bowl in 2014 will generate $500 million in tax dollars for the East Rutherford/New York City area. So whatever the citizens had to flip the bill for, they will get back in tax dollars generated by hotels, resteraunts, gas, alcohol, and tobacco revenue made those two weeks prior to the Super Bowl (not to mention the actual game).

          So what the NFL needs to do is practice what they preach. I believe the NFL should begin a rotation where every NFL city gets to host a Super Bowl once every thirty one years. This would ensure that each city get's a new stadium once every thirty years (or upgrades generated by the $500 million in taxes genrated during the Super Bowl) Otherwise, I would sue the NFL for collusion charges for allowing New York to host an outdoor Super Bowl in a cold environment and not allowing my city to do the same.

          St.Louis could then ask their citizens to help flip the bill for a new stadium in 2014 with the promise that "whatever you put in you will get back when the Super Bowl comes to town."
          -06-05-2010, 11:07 AM
        • zgare
          Stadium Ranking Categories for CVC and Rams Analysis
          by zgare
          Since CVC and the Rams have to determine what they can do to put the Edward Jones Dome in the top quarter of stadiums in the NFL, I thought I'd try to determinge what catgories would determine that. When others rank stadiums, they always seem to add things about the fans or the team, such as electric atmosphere. Those things are pretty much all determined by how good the team is on the field, and how long they have played at a high level. Then they cite Lambeu and Foxboro. They have nothing to do with the actual physical facility -- but that is what CVC and the Rams must rank. They can't just rank on age -- who has the oldest concrete. They need to be a little more scientific and rankd category by category.
          How about these for categories:
          1. Average distance from each fan to the center of the field. Measure the distance from each seat in the stadium to the center of the field, add them up, and divided by the number of seats.
          2. Physical Environment control for the Fans -- temperature, wind, light, average seat width and padding.
          3. Number of concessions and restrooms per seat. Average distance of concessions and restrooms from each seat.
          4. Number of club seats and luxury skyboxes.
          5. Parking nearby -- average distance a fan must walk from the closest XX/2 parking spaces to the stadium. XX= number of seats in the stadium. (assume 2 fans per car)
          6. Hotels nearby -- average distance a fan must walk from the closest XX/50 hotel rooms to the stadium. (assume 1/50 of fans use a hotel room.)
          7. Restaurants nearby -- average distance a fan must walk from the closest XX/20 restaurants to the stadium. (assume 1/20 of fans use a restaurant.)
          8. Tailgating nearby -- average distance a fan must walk from the closest XX/10 tailgateable spaces to the stadium. (assume 1/10 of fans tailgate.)
          9. Stadium interior emenities -- Jumbo screens number and size, other electronic info, banners/honors, party zones/restuarants.
          -01-22-2012, 04:04 PM
        • Molotov
          So what's the problem with the Dome?
          by Molotov
          My son and I made our first trip to St Louis for the game Sunday. I'll be posting various observations from our trip over the next few days. Here's my first one. I've heard many complain about the Dome. I've read reviews that rate it as the worst stadium in the NFL. WTF? We thought it was awesome. Comfortable seats, ample room, clean and well kept, friendly and helpful staff. What gives?

          My son made one astute observation. Any indoor stadium is by default better than an outdoor stadium. We went to a Ram-Charger game four years ago, and this experience was 10 times better in all regards. Of course, we didn't have to deal with parking. We have absolutely no interest in watching a game outdoors in Buffalo, Green Bay, New York, Chicago, etc.
          -11-02-2010, 09:33 PM
        Working...
        X