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  • At the end of Jackon's career...

    Will he be known as "better" than Marshall Faulk?

    No, I don't think he will be, in my opinion. I think nobody can truly be like Faulk -- a back that could run the ball helping you out on the tough yardage; 'caught the ball; blocked and really made some nice ones for Kurt Warner back in the hayday; and last but not least, he motivated our St. Louis Rams' offense for years, becoming a true team leader, and I just don't see Jackson doing ALL of those. Then again, that's just my opinion.

    I apologize if this has been asked before, but I'm just trying to spark ClanRam from all of the "Why Linehan why?"-type threads, and all the sadness that has been going around. No, I don't get online often (don't have the time, realistically. However, I do visit alot, just it's the fact I don't have the time and chance to post.)

    I'm just looking to read some opinions, and etc. from other fellow Rams fans.

    Thanks.

    GO RAMS!
    Last edited by ramstough39; -11-15-2006, 03:40 PM. Reason: 'Left out a reason or so

  • #2
    Re: At the end of Jackon's career...

    I don't think he's going to be better than Faulk.

    Then again, I don't think he has to be, either.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: At the end of Jackon's career...

      it's like apples and oranges. two very different running styles... but both were (are) great receivers out of the backfield. i think it will come down to whether the rams can win a championship or not with jackson in the back.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: At the end of Jackon's career...

        Jackson is a great back and he's going to be one for a while. He has so many different talents that the Rams seem to still be trying out exactly how to utilize all of them.

        For all of his talents though, I dont believe he could ever come close to Faulk.

        And no running back really can for that matter. Faulk was the spark that led a 4-12 team to the Super Bowl the next season. Faulk changed the entire concept of the words Running Back. No longer were backs looked at only as a running threat. Now they had to be accounted for out of the backfield as a receiver as well.

        Without Faulk then many RBs that are stars today probably wouldnt be utilized to their full abilities. Could you imagine Ladanian Tomlinson not being looked at as a passing option? Faulk changed how the game is played. He is a Hall of Fame Running Back and probably the best all-purpose back of all time.

        But Nick put it best. He wont be better than Faulk, but he doesnt have to be.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: At the end of Jackon's career...

          the only RB who would be considered better then Failk in the current NFL is Tomlinson, so i dont think Jackson should be worrying too much
          @EssexRam_

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: At the end of Jackon's career...

            Originally posted by smizzhfx View Post
            ...but both were (are) great receivers out of the backfield.
            Faulk was a great receiver out of the backfield/slot. He could have been a good WR.

            Jackson is a good receiver out of the backfield. I wouldn't put him at the level of Faulk. At least, not yet.
            That's my story, and I'm sticking to it!!

            Comment

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            • Guest's Avatar
              I think everyone should stop with their BS story about Faulk not wantin to play more.
              by Guest
              Faulk may have went to management and told them it was time to make a change because he is good hearted and they chose a RB with their first over all pick.
              How many players anywhere in the NFL would go to management and tell them to play some one else ahead of them none is the answer because they are all after the dollar but not Faulk he wants to see the kid get a chance and succeed. But Faulk still has a lot of game left in him and if Jackson ever went down with an injury and they had to play Faulk you would see that I can honestly say Jackson has helped contribute to our losing season with his no gain runs and getting two QB's blown up by bad blocking both Bulger and Martin were the victims of his poor blocking.

              Faulk has a lot of game left and this was the first off-season in a long time he did not have to have surgery. He is as healthy and as good as he has been in a long time. I guarantee you if I had to win a game I would take Faulk over Jackson as my running back. Once Faulk saw they drafted a RB he knew he did not have a lot of years left and he knew they had to play the #1 RB in the draft pretty quickly and that is why I believe he said they should play him. Because how would people feel if Faulk played good and we did not start Jackson for another 4 years they would all be wondering why we spent such a high pick on someone that sets on the bench.


              Nick Faulk did it for the team and Jackson no one else in the NFL would have done what he did. Faulk may have thought at the time that Jackson might be able to handle the starting job and knowing that they selected him so high they would have to play him soon. Faulk is today better then Jackson. He is as healthy as he has ever been.
              -12-11-2005, 10:25 PM
            • RamDez
              Faulk Leads Young RBs
              by RamDez
              Faulk Leads Young RBs
              Thursday, August 19, 2004


              By Nick Wagoner
              Staff Writer


              Marshall Faulk has never been a vocal guy. But, then, he has never had to be. One look at his numbers or any of his game film, and even the casual observer can see that everything he does on the field speaks for itself.

              What do the numbers say? Well, aside from the staggering size of most of them, they don’t simply speak, but scream one thing: Hall of Fame. It’s not debatable whether Faulk is one of the game’s all-time greats; he has racked up 11,213 rushing yards, 6,274 receiving yards and 131 total touchdowns.

              With the shrill pitch those numbers express, it might be easy for Faulk to get complacent and continue the trend. Complacency, though, has never been in Faulk’s dictionary and it isn’t being added this season. The former league MVP and Pro Bowler has accomplished most everything a player can accomplish in the NFL.

              The bad news for the rest of the league is that Faulk appears healthy for the first time in awhile. Coach Mike Martz said he sometimes has to hold back his enthusiasm about Faulk. “He looks like the Marshall of old out here,” Martz said. "He feels so good and when he’s like that we try not to put a damper on it, but we also just want him to be cautious.”

              A nagging knee injury and a hand injury have caused Faulk to miss time in recent years, but he continues to play, not because he wants to prove his doubters wrong, but solely because he loves the game.

              Faulk has never asked himself what more he can accomplish, but he has a few ideas of what he wants to improve on. Faulk is one of the Rams’ captains this season. Normally, Faulk leads by example and it isn’t hard for him because of his success. Now, with three talented young backs angling to be his heir apparent, Faulk is attempting to take a more vocal role, something he has never done. “When you get in the heat of the battle, there are certain things that only another player can help you with,” Faulk said. “If I do something that’s kind of different, I want them to know what my thoughts were and what I was thinking and try to get them on the same page. “I’m just trying to find a way to become a better leader.”

              While Faulk has spent most of his training camp on the sidelines, ensuring his health for the regular season, he has also provided an ear for his younger counterparts to turn to for advice. Faulk’s wisdom is readily available to Lamar Gordon, Arlen Harris and rookie Steven Jackson. With Faulk and running backs coach Wilbert Montgomery — a former Pro Bowl running back for the Philadelphia Eagles — providing the knowledge, the trio of backups has two accomplished runners leading the way.

              Jackson could have easily come to training camp with ideas of displacing Faulk. After all, Jackson was the first running back taken in April’s Draft and there was rampant speculation...
              -08-19-2004, 02:46 PM
            • RamWraith
              Faulk's Finest Hour
              by RamWraith
              Wednesday, December 19, 2007

              By Nick Wagoner
              Senior Writer

              Stuck in a dire situation, Marshall Faulk found himself in a form of football purgatory in 1998. After five years in Indianapolis, Faulk had reached his breaking point.

              All of the struggles, all of the mistakes and most of all, all of the losses had finally caused Faulk to go to management and seek something better. Faulk didn’t ask much; it wasn’t about the money. He could have had plenty of that from the Colts.

              What Faulk wanted was a chance to win. So when he received word on April 15, 1999, that he was being sent to the Rams for a second and fifth round selection in the upcoming NFL Draft, Faulk was less than thrilled.

              “My thoughts when I first came to St. Louis weren’t good,” Faulk said. “I felt like I was in a bad situation and the situation in St. Louis wasn’t any better.”

              Considering that in his five seasons in the league, the Rams had won 26 games or six less than the Colts in that same time frame. Of course, Indianapolis had gone 3-13 the two previous seasons and appeared headed nowhere.

              But that didn’t mean Faulk was thrilled with his new home in St. Louis. As Faulk watches his No. 28 jersey raised to the rafters Thursday night, never to be worn by a Ram again, it’s hard not to imagine how he went from unhappy all-star to man of honor.

              A MINI REVELATION

              Entering the 1999 offseason, the Rams were faced with the task of overhauling a boring offense that scored so little that the scorekeeper at the Edward Jones Dome felt like the Maytag repairman.

              To that end, the Rams aggressively pursued help on the line and at the skill positions. They signed Trent Green to play quarterback and Adam Timmerman at guard. They drafted young receiver Torry Holt out of North Carolina State and hired a young offensive-minded coordinator in the form of Mike Martz.

              While those moves were a step in the right direction, none had the cache that would really draw the attention of landing a Pro Bowl running back such as Faulk. In the days leading to the draft, the Rams finally settled on a deal and Faulk became a Ram.

              With Faulk in the fold, it appeared the Rams had the foundation for an explosive offensive but it remained to be seen how the pieces would come together. Of course, it would have been impossible for those pieces to fit if Faulk never entered the fray.

              Faulk got to St. Louis without a new contract in hand and wasn’t even sure he wanted to be here. After careful consideration, Faulk decided to give the Rams a shot before he made a decision.

              “I took my time and I thought about it and I think the best thing that I did was I decided to go to minicamp and I got a chance to be around the likes of Isaac Bruce, Trent Green, etc,” Faulk said. “I got an opportunity to see that this team was...
              -12-19-2007, 04:44 PM
            • RamWraith
              St. Louis fans might have seen the last of Faulk
              by RamWraith
              By Bernie Miklasz
              ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
              12/24/2005



              If this was Marshall Faulk's final home game, his old friends made sure to mark the moment, this potential passage of time, by saying goodbye to No. 28.

              Wide receiver Isaac Bruce and offensive tackle Orlando Pace, two Rams who have been with Faulk the longest, gave him a hug as a selection of Faulk's career highlights played on the stadium video board at the end of Sunday's 24-20 loss to the San Francisco *****.

              When Faulk came to the Rams in 1999, they were nothing. And he picked up the football and ran to places this franchise had never gone before. The other Rams followed Faulk to two Super Bowls and five trips to the playoffs, and they conspired with him to produce an adventure-ride, thrill-a-minute offense.

              And now as Faulk walked off his home field for perhaps the last time as a Ram, the full-circle aspect of his career came to a close. In blowing a 20-7 lead, the soft Rams allowed no-name running backs to become Jim Brown and Gale Sayers for the day. The loss squished the Rams' record to 5-10, and they are nothing again, just as they were before Faulk entered the building in 1999.

              "If it was his last day here, I'm truly embarrassed," Bruce said. "Because it was an embarrassing game. Embarrassing to Marshall and embarrassing to the city of St. Louis.

              "And if this was it for him here, I want to thank him. I'm a fan of football, and a fan of his, and he's done a lot to extend my career. When Marshall came here he made everyone better. He made his teammates better. He made his coaches better coaches. He put the organization on another level, as far as being a top-flight organization."

              Don't close the door to The Ed just yet. Faulk could return in 2006. If he retires, or if he's released or traded, the Rams would absorb a salary-cap hit of about $4 million. It makes more sense (and dollars) to ask him to continue in a reserve role behind Steven Jackson. And Faulk still has an urge to play.

              "Right now I feel like I do," Faulk said. "But I'm going to sit down when the season's over and make a decision. It's hard to say. I've been playing football for a long time, and it's something that I love doing. To just give you a quick answer after a hard loss to a division opponent, wouldn't even be right."

              Faulk surely must believe he has something to offer a team willing to tap into his rushing-receiving skills. Finishing his 12th NFL season, Faulk has lost speed, and his knees can't physically endure the punishment of handling the ball 20, 25 times a game.

              That said, he isn't John Unitas stumbling around in a San Diego Chargers uniform, or Joe Namath limping to the line of scrimmage for the Los Angeles Rams. Faulk can still play, still go, still make a difference if used properly....
              -12-25-2005, 05:26 AM
            • RamWraith
              Faulk Leads Young RBs
              by RamWraith
              Thursday, August 19, 2004

              By Nick Wagoner
              Staff Writer

              Marshall Faulk has never been a vocal guy. But, then, he has never had to be. One look at his numbers or any of his game film, and even the casual observer can see that everything he does on the field speaks for itself.

              What do the numbers say? Well, aside from the staggering size of most of them, they don’t simply speak, but scream one thing: Hall of Fame. It’s not debatable whether Faulk is one of the game’s all-time greats; he has racked up 11,213 rushing yards, 6,274 receiving yards and 131 total touchdowns.

              With the shrill pitch those numbers express, it might be easy for Faulk to get complacent and continue the trend. Complacency, though, has never been in Faulk’s dictionary and it isn’t being added this season. The former league MVP and Pro Bowler has accomplished most everything a player can accomplish in the NFL.

              The bad news for the rest of the league is that Faulk appears healthy for the first time in awhile. Coach Mike Martz said he sometimes has to hold back his enthusiasm about Faulk. “He looks like the Marshall of old out here,” Martz said. "He feels so good and when he’s like that we try not to put a damper on it, but we also just want him to be cautious.”

              A nagging knee injury and a hand injury have caused Faulk to miss time in recent years, but he continues to play, not because he wants to prove his doubters wrong, but solely because he loves the game.

              Faulk has never asked himself what more he can accomplish, but he has a few ideas of what he wants to improve on. Faulk is one of the Rams’ captains this season. Normally, Faulk leads by example and it isn’t hard for him because of his success. Now, with three talented young backs angling to be his heir apparent, Faulk is attempting to take a more vocal role, something he has never done. “When you get in the heat of the battle, there are certain things that only another player can help you with,” Faulk said. “If I do something that’s kind of different, I want them to know what my thoughts were and what I was thinking and try to get them on the same page. “I’m just trying to find a way to become a better leader.”

              While Faulk has spent most of his training camp on the sidelines, ensuring his health for the regular season, he has also provided an ear for his younger counterparts to turn to for advice. Faulk’s wisdom is readily available to Lamar Gordon, Arlen Harris and rookie Steven Jackson. With Faulk and running backs coach Wilbert Montgomery — a former Pro Bowl running back for the Philadelphia Eagles — providing the knowledge, the trio of backups has two accomplished runners leading the way.

              Jackson could have easily come to training camp with ideas of displacing Faulk. After all, Jackson was the first running back taken in April’s Draft and there was rampant speculation about the...
              -08-19-2004, 11:33 AM
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