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Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

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  • Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

    From "The League. The rise and decline of the NFL":

    The last person to see Carroll Rosenbloom alive was one Raymond Tanguay, a middle-aged French-Canadian tourist. Tanguay was standing on the beach. Rosenbloom was at least 150 yards out to sea, screaming for help. The Canadian charged into the water and fought his way out to where C.R. was, but his heroism was to no avail. Tanguay later estimated that Rosenbloom had been floating face down for 5 minutes before he reached him. "I took out a piece of wood," he remembered. "Three times I put the man on the wood, but every time the big rough wave take the man again into the water. I don't know how far out I was, but the people looked far, far away. I wanted to save him. I did everything I could, but it was not enough. I didn't catch him at a good time. The water was too much rough."

    Someone called the Golden Beach police about 2:00 PM and the chief and another officer rushed down to the water. "When we got to the beach," the chief reported, "we saw two men in heavy surf about 150 yards from the beach. One man was trying to support the other. We took off our clothes and went in the water, but by the time we got there, the other man was near exhaustion. There was no apparent sign of life [in Rosenbloom] when we got to him." Before Rosenbloom's body could be brought ashore, the rescuers were dragged almost 150 yards north along the face of the beach by the heavy seas.

    Georgia Rosenbloom was notified shortly thereafter. According to one source close to the Rosenbloom's, her first call was to Hugh Culverhouse, owner of the Tampa franchise and executor of Rosenbloom's estate. Culverhouse soon notified Rozelle. The commissioner, in turn, notified the rest of the league. "Everyone was very shocked that Carroll had died like that," remembered Rozelle. "No one could understand the drowning because Carroll had lived there in Golden Beach off and on for several years. They couldn't understand it." Gene Klein's response was typical. "I was shocked," he admitted. "Carroll wasn't a strong swimmer. It's hard to fathom him going out in the ocean in those circumstances." Still somewhat stunned, Rozelle spoke with the press that afternoon. "Carroll Rosenbloom played a major role in the growth and success of the NFL," the commissioner observed, "both through the teams he produced and through his active participation in the league's decision making process. We had some differences over things in the League that he felt affected his team adversely. I was very pleased that in the recent months it was considered past and gone and we had a very close relationship."

    Steve Rosenbloom learned of his father’s death after returning to the Rams offices on Pico Blvd. from an errand in the San Fernando Valley. When he walked in, Steve's pregnant wife, Renee, was there crying. Renee had got the news earlier but had been unable to find him. Steve immediately prepared to fly to Florida for a private funeral in accordance with Jewish ritual. First he met with members of the Rams coaching and office staff. "There's no danger of any changes," Steve reassured them. "C.R. wanted the team to remain with the Rosenbloom family and he's taken great care to make certain it would."

    Most Assumed the franchise would now pass to Steve.

    Like many assumptions about Carroll, it was off the mark. In fact, Rosenbloom left behind no sole heir to his football team. As part of a private trust activated before Carroll's death, Steve was charged with "managerial and operational" responsibility for the Rams, but actual controlling ownership was left to his widow, Georgia, who inherited seventy percent of the clubs stock. The remaining thirty percent was split equally among C.R.'s three children from his first marriage and his two from his second. “He wanted Georgia to have the income and status," Steve explained, "and he wanted me to run it. Carroll was into continuity. He wanted the Carroll Rosenbloom philosophy to carry on."

    Georgia, however, did not see herself in quite so passive a chief executive role. "I know what Carroll wanted," she pointed out to the LA Times several days after C.R.'s death. "Carroll knew he would live through me. He still runs the Rams. I'm just an extension of Carroll Rosenbloom. I don't want to sound kooky, but I feel as close to him as ever. We were never apart, you know. We talked over everything. It was Carroll's wish that the Rams continue as a closely knit family operation and I look forward to working with Steve."

    The two-headed organization Carroll Rosenbloom left behind was on shaky ground from its first day. Steve thought Georgia had been "good for my father", but was not otherwise close to his stepmother. At the family funeral in Florida, he was put off even further. "She was already into talking about the will," he claimed. "I thought it was in poor taste at best." When Steve asked to see his father’s body before it was cremated, Georgia objected and Steve viewed it anyway. Steve was even more upset by her behavior at the service itself. To start with, Georgia was more than an hour late and kept everyone else waiting, including Carroll's siblings, all in there seventies or older. Her attitude, according to Steve, was "less than the grieving widow. She was a grade B actress at best and she couldn't pull it off. She could have pretended to care at least. She didn't even talk to Carroll’s brothers."

    If Steve Rosenbloom was upset by what happened in Florida, the memorial ceremony Georgia staged back in LA positively turned his stomach. "C.R. didn't want a service," his son complained. "He told me and Georgia that at the same time. He didn't want a service, period. The thing she had was like a coming-out party. It was the sleaziest thing I've been to. There was dancing on the tennis court, for Christ's sake. It was no more Carroll than the man on the moon. It was pathetic."

    Georgia’s memorial service was held on April 11 at Carroll's Bel-Air estate. According to the Los Angeles Times. "The tribute was handled as a celebration of life rather than morning over death. All the music was upbeat and the tone, as set by Mrs. Rosenbloom, was light and loving." The eulogies were given beneath a large green and white striped party tent erected on a broad grassy tier behind the house. The NFL was represented by Pete Rozelle, Al Davis, Art Modell, Tex Schram, Hugh Culverhouse, Gene Klein, Billy Sullivan, Eddie DeBartolo, Leonard Tose, Max Winter, Robert Irsey, Art Rooney, and several others. According to one NFL source, Rozelle had been asked to speak but "shied away from the circus atmosphere." Anaheim, where the Rams where still going, was represented by Mayor John Seymour. Los Angeles was represented by Tom Bradley. Hollywood was represented by Warren Beaty, Kirk Douglas, Cary Grant, Jimmy Stewart, Rod Steiger, and Henry Mancini.

    All of them waited under the green and white tent almost an hour before Georgia finally made her appearance. She then kicked things off with a welcoming speech. “Carroll didn't want any tears," she said. "He didn't like sad songs or sad endings." Then Georgia turned the ceremony over to the master of ceremonies, comedian Jonathan Winters. "He was a special man," Winters observed of the departed. "He wanted the super bowl more than I did." Winters was followed by ten other eulogists, including a rabbi, a priest, three football players, two actors, and two owners of football teams. The two owner’s football owners were Art Modell and Al Davis. Of the two, Davis' remarks were by far the more memorable.

    "Among the great people in my world," Al Davis observed, "Carroll Rosenbloom was the giant. It will never be over with me. Come autumn, and the roar of the crowd, I'll always think of him."

    Afterward, the memorial service. According to the Times', became "a buffet party" on the Rosenbloom tennis court, complete with "string orchestra," "festive flower-laden tables," and "strolling musicians." Georgia Rosenbloom was a charming hostess. Steve Rosenbloom left early.

  • #2
    Re: Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

    Thanks very much for posting this ramtime. This article is very interesting and clears up a lot of misconcenptions i had about the tragic death of rosenbloom.

    It would be nice to see some articles from around the time steve rosenbloom was deposed in favor of john shaw. I would love to know more about the circumstances. Was it a simple buyout, was the trust/will manipulated in some other way or did her 70% ownership simply give her the authority to make the change.

    I wonder how rams history might have changed if carrolls wishes to have steve continue to run the team had been carried out.

    ramming speed to all

    sign the big man, and long live marshall

    general counsel

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

      Steve Rosenbloom concures with the fact that CR wanted Georgia to have the status so I dont really see any monkey business manipulating the will. You are the lawyer here so you give it your best shot. Can a 70% owner of a corporation be mandated to keeping certain personel or was this wishful thinking on CR's part? Could it have been pillow talk between Georgia and CR in essense Georgia saying "Yes love if anything ever happens Steve will run the Rams he will carry on the Rosenbloom legend yada yada yada." I believe it was verbal between Georgia and CR probably right before Georgia stuck her head beneath the covers.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

        I have no way of knowing what the will said. 70% equity ownership is not by definition the same thing as voting control. It usually is of course, but there could be separate classes of stock that provide supervoting rights to minority equity holders, and there could certainly have been a provision of the will or some other shareholders agreement that put day to day control of the business in steve's hands and prevented georgia from making a change absent some form of gross negligence or willful misconduct. These types of arrangements are rare, but they do exist.

        The context of my question was whether steve and his brothers sold out to georgia as part of a negotiated deal when the change in day to day control occured.

        The real question is what did carroll want. If he wanted georgia to own the team and steve to run it, there were ways he could have provided for that legally. If he wanted that to be the case but didnt effectuate his intentions in a legal manner, ie via will or some of shareholders agreement or trust document, than its more of an ethical matter, ie did georgia disregard carrolls wishes, even if she had no legal obligation to fullfill them.

        ramming speed to all

        sign the big man

        long live marshall

        general counsel

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

          Sorry about that GC. I thought it was Avenger that answered my post. I am still getting to know this forum and when I saw Avengers handle (which I posted duh) I thought he may know because he is a lawyer that is why I replied in the fashion that I did. BTW are you a lawyer? With a handle like General Council I wonder.

          Anyway thanks for the info.
          Go Rams.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

            Here is the short article regarding another one of the questions I submitted which obviously stumped the Herd.


            Back in 1977, Al Davis acted as an intermediary between Don Klosterman and Bill Walsh. Rams owner Carroll Rosenbloom was thinking about firing Chuck Knox because he hadn't made it to the Super Bowl. Klosterman asked Davis to inquire about Walsh. Walsh didn't want to get involved because he'd already accepted the Stanford head coaching job and thought it was unfair to Knox.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

              Ramtime, i am an attorney, but by no means an expert of any kind on wills, trusts and estates. I am a transactional lawyer who works primarily in franchising and structuring corporate transactions.

              By the way, your reputation proceeds you on this board. For over a month people have been talking about how to persuade you to come over and join us. Now that you have made it, it is certainly a big plus for all of us. I look forward to ongoing spirited dialogue with you as we move forward Ramming together.

              Ramming speed to all

              sign the big man

              general counsel

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

                I don't suppose that anyone will ever know for sure what happened but there's one thing that really bugs me for some reason. I have to preface this by saying that I'm not a sexist.

                That being said, why did Georgia revert to her maiden name so quickly after acquiring the team? If she was really trying to honor and celebrate Carrol why not keep his name while profiting from the gold mine he left? To me, she acts like she really believes it's "her" team. Like she built it, or made the millions to acquire it.

                I have a very limited knowledge of this whole situation but my impression is that she did nothing more than spend a little time on her back and sucker an old lonely man out of his millions.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

                  LOL Moke... No comment...

                  P.S. Hope you don't mind the nickname. If so, let me know...
                  This space for rent...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

                    Moklerman, she did not revert to her maiden name, she remarried dominic frontierre. As you may recall, dominic was arrested allegedly scalping tickets to superbowl 14.

                    ramming speed to all,

                    sign the big man

                    general counsel

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

                      I have to be honest guys. Since I didn't pick up on the Rams until the move to the Lou, I had no idea some of this stuff had gone on. I had heard that Georgia inherited the team, but I didn't really know the circumstances.

                      It sounds like things were really different under Rosenblumm. Were they?
                      The more things change, the more they stay the same.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

                        Originally posted by general counsel
                        Moklerman, she did not revert to her maiden name, she remarried dominic frontierre. As you may recall, dominic was arrested allegedly scalping tickets to superbowl 14.

                        ramming speed to all,

                        sign the big man

                        general counsel
                        Now that is classy. (I can actually smell my own sarcasm)
                        The more things change, the more they stay the same.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

                          In terms of thing being different under rosenbloom, he owned the team from 1972, when he acquired it in a trade with robert irsay sr (irsay bought it from the reeves estate), until his death in april 1979. We won six straight division titles and reached the championship game several times. He was a beloved senior statesman who was actively involved in running the team.

                          When georgia took over, there became a number of situations over the years where she was allegedly very tight with the cash. In the pre salary cap era, many blamed her failure to spend money for our lean years, especially since the rams were a very very profitable team due to their stadium deal in anaheim and later st louis. One of the allegations was that john shaw, who was running the team, was really a businessman rather than a football guy. When steve rosenbloom left, don klosterman, the charely armey of his day, left with him.

                          It would be great to hear from others on the differences in how the team was run.


                          ramming speed to all

                          sign the big man

                          general counsel

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

                            I didn't realize that Frontiere wasn't her maiden name, so I guess I was criticizing her for the right thing but the wrong reason. The fact that she was married so soon after his death is worse than just dropping his name to me. The more I find out about her the more I don't like.

                            I have to admit that I don't know enough about the whole situation to make an educated decision though, as I started rooting for the Rams in 1979 when I was 8 years old and probably wouldn't have been able to grasp the nuansces of inheritance, widows re-marrying, etc., etc.

                            Anyone and everyone who wants to keep filling us all in with more details would be greatly appreciated. I apologize if it's a re-hashing for some or bringing up painful memories for others but I'd really like to know more. To me, it's one of the most pivotal points in Rams history and I'd like to get the whole scoop.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.

                              Originally posted by moklerman
                              Anyone and everyone who wants to keep filling us all in with more details would be greatly appreciated. I apologize if it's a re-hashing for some or bringing up painful memories for others but I'd really like to know more. To me, it's one of the most pivotal points in Rams history and I'd like to get the whole scoop.

                              And therein is the rub. It is only partly pivotal. Georgia did no more than the menfolk did 50 years prior. Moving the Rams from Cleveland set the stage for the questions about "business principles" vs loyalty vs ROI for entertainment. Did she not get what she should have been entitled to to stay in LA? She she have stayed and lost money? Do fans deserve corporate loyalty? Should the corporation have a social conscience? Are fans entitled to a sports identity? What are the Rams? Just the Horns as some have said?

                              I have never been convinced that Georgia and Shaw have had the fans interests at heart as much as they should. But is that their job? Is the team a money-maker for shareholders ; the current political version of the Roman Coliseum to placate the masses; or, entertainment that doesn't come free? Where you line up on these questions I suspect will shape how you think the team has been handled over the years - right or wrong.

                              I'm afraid no one will ever come clean and just say ... "as long as my job is secure ... I don't care if the team is moved to India to become the Dali Lama Rams ... to helll with what fans think ... that raise in personal seat license fees has yet to cover my bonus ... and I need it because I ain't got enough toys yet."

                              Good luck molkerman in distilling history to find out how we got here ...

                              Comment

                              Related Topics

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                              • RamWraith
                                Restoring Rams to greatness would honor mother's legacy
                                by RamWraith
                                By Bernie Miklasz
                                ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
                                Thursday, Feb. 28 2008

                                NEW YORK — Chip Rosenbloom was 14 when his father, Carroll Rosenbloom, drowned
                                in the rough surf near the family's beachfront home in South Florida. Chip was
                                on the beach, the last person to see his father alive before the elder
                                Rosenbloom disappeared into the waves.

                                Rosenbloom perished on April 2, 1979. But the traumatic experience haunts Chip
                                to this day; he still speaks about it with a sense of shock. But the tragedy
                                brought Chip Rosenbloom even closer to his mother, Georgia Frontiere, who owned
                                the Rams until her death on Jan. 18.

                                Chip and his mother had an incredibly tight bond. She was not only a nurturing
                                mother, but a best friend. Frontiere spent the final five-plus months of her
                                life in the hospital, trying desperately but unsuccessfully to survive the
                                devastation of

                                terminal breast cancer, and Chip was there with her.

                                During those five agonizing months, Chip maintained a bedside vigil for all but
                                seven days. And on four of those days, he was absent only because his mother
                                demanded that he get away to rest and be with his family.

                                As Rosenbloom watched over his mother, he put his successful film career on
                                hold. His wife, Kathleen, and their son Alexander, 14, and daughter Olivia, 10,
                                spent many hours at the hospital. But in many respects, Chip and his sister,
                                Lucia Rodriguez, had to go this alone.

                                "There were moments of incredible hopes where we felt like she was going to
                                pull through and we'd have many years with her," Rosenbloom said. "And then
                                there were moments of incredible sadness. It was a really rough time, roughest
                                time I've ever been through. I guarantee you my sister would say the same thing.

                                "At 14, losing my dad was obviously very traumatic. It was so sudden. I
                                couldn't imagine a world that my dad wasn't in. In my mom's case, you talk
                                about her beauty, her vitality, her charisma, her energy, just everything. She
                                was so amazing and inspiring, and in the hospital, she still had that. I mean,
                                you look at her face and you say, 'She shouldn't be here.'""''

                                Rosenbloom, 45, is the Rams' new managing partner and de facto owner. But he's
                                still grieving over his mother's death. He traveled to New York this week to
                                meet NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, but there was a more soulful reason for
                                the trip: Chip and Kathleen stayed in Georgia's Manhattan apartment, and sorted
                                through her belongings in preparation of closing another period of her life. It
                                saddened Chip, but his mood rallies.

                                "To my mother, to Georgia," Rosenbloom said as he raised a toast Monday night
                                at Frontiere's favorite Italian...
                                -02-28-2008, 06:46 AM
                              • RamWraith
                                Restoring Rams to greatness would honor his mother's legacy
                                by RamWraith
                                By Bernie Miklasz
                                ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
                                02/28/2008

                                Sports Columnist Bernie Miklasz


                                NEW YORK — Chip Rosenbloom was 14 when his father, Carroll Rosenbloom, drowned in the rough surf near the family's beachfront home in South Florida. Chip was on the beach, the last person to see his father alive before the elder Rosenbloom disappeared into the waves.

                                Rosenbloom perished on April 2, 1979. But the traumatic experience haunts Chip to this day; he still speaks about it with a sense of shock. But the tragedy brought Chip Rosenbloom even closer to his mother, Georgia Frontiere, who owned the Rams until her death on Jan. 18.

                                Chip and his mother had an incredibly tight bond. She was not only a nurturing mother, but a best friend. Frontiere spent the final five-plus months of her life in the hospital, trying desperately but unsuccessfully to survive the devastation of

                                terminal breast cancer, and Chip was there with her.

                                During those five agonizing months, Chip maintained a bedside vigil for all but seven days. And on four of those days, he was absent only because his mother demanded that he get away to rest and be with his family.

                                As Rosenbloom watched over his mother, he put his successful film career on hold. His wife, Kathleen, and their son Alexander, 14, and daughter Olivia, 10, spent many hours at the hospital. But in many respects, Chip and his sister, Lucia Rodriguez, had to go this alone.

                                "There were moments of incredible hopes where we felt like she was going to pull through and we'd have many years with her," Rosenbloom said. "And then there were moments of incredible sadness. It was a really rough time, roughest time I've ever been through. I guarantee you my sister would say the same thing.

                                "At 14, losing my dad was obviously very traumatic. It was so sudden. I couldn't imagine a world that my dad wasn't in. In my mom's case, you talk about her beauty, her vitality, her charisma, her energy, just everything. She was so amazing and inspiring, and in the hospital, she still had that. I mean, you look at her face and you say, 'She shouldn't be here.' "

                                Rosenbloom, 43, is the Rams' new managing partner and de facto owner. But he's still grieving over his mother's death. He traveled to New York this week to meet NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, but there was a more soulful reason for the trip: Chip and Kathleen stayed in Georgia's Manhattan apartment, and sorted through her belongings in preparation of closing another period of her life. It saddened Chip, but his mood rallies.

                                "To my mother, to Georgia," Rosenbloom said as he raised a toast Monday night at Frontiere's favorite Italian restaurant. "This is what she would want, to see everyone together and being happy." MORE BERNIE


                                After Frontiere's...
                                -03-01-2008, 07:26 AM
                              • Guest's Avatar
                                Quote from Steve Rosenbloom
                                by Guest
                                In another thread we were discussing the business end of Rosenblooms decision. This further emphasises that Rosenbloom DID want georgia to have the team. Steve Rosenbloom explains why.

                                <BEGIN>

                                Carroll's offspring from an earlier marriage had begun, as a teenager, doing Colts laundry. Rosenbloom figured to be succeeded by his kid as franchise boss. By now, so much has become estranged. Steve and Georgia don't speak.

                                "My dad should be able to see what's happened to his legacy," Steve told the Post-Dispatch. He lives north of New Orleans in Covington, La. "Dad wasn't dead 15 minutes and she was in her glory.

                                "Dad told me he was trying to take advantage of the widows tax exemption (by making Georgia the prime beneficiary). He said he'd rather trust Georgia to do the right thing than to battle with Uncle Sam. He expected her to sit home and do the social things."

                                <End>
                                source St. Petersburgh Times
                                http://www.stpetersburgtimes.com/New...d_road_t.shtml
                                -07-21-2004, 11:49 AM
                              • MauiRam
                                Rams owner Chip Rosenbloom checks in ..
                                by MauiRam
                                Team's new owners make the rounds at NFL meetings
                                By Jim Thomas
                                ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
                                04/02/2008

                                Rams owner Chip Rosenbloom

                                PALM BEACH, Fla. — As a neophyte NFL owner, Chip Rosenbloom experienced at least one "rookie" moment at the league meetings this week in Florida.

                                Standing in a meeting room with sister Lucia Rodriguez and Rams executive vice president Bob Wallace, Rosenbloom's mind was elsewhere during the perfunctory team-by-team roll call.

                                "I didn't even hear 'St. Louis' called," Rosenbloom said, smiling. "And I hear Bob Wallace say, 'Yes.'"

                                That is "yes," as in present and accounted for, which also sums up Rosenbloom's first NFL meeting as a Rams owner. Advertisement

                                Over the years, Rosenbloom has attended about 15 of these meetings, but many were as a child tagging along with his late mother (Georgia Frontiere), or late father (Carroll Rosenbloom).

                                He also has attended several of these meetings later as an adult, including last year's gathering in Phoenix.

                                Those times, he was in the meeting rooms rubbing elbows with owners and executives as league matters were discussed.

                                But this week is different, serving as his official introduction as a Rams owner.

                                "Last year, when I went to the meetings, people knew me as Georgia's son," Rosenbloom said. "And this year, Lucia and I are here as the owners of the team. It was a different experience definitely."

                                Rosenbloom and Rodriguez inherited the family's 60 percent share of the team when Frontiere died of breast cancer Jan. 18. Rosenbloom has the franchise's controlling vote.

                                On behalf of the NFL, Commissioner Roger Goodell paid his respects to Frontiere during his opening address Monday.

                                According to Rosenbloom, Goodell told the group that the NFL had lost part of the family and that Frontiere was a wonderful, optimistic and inspiring person.

                                "It was very nice. And sad," Rosenbloom said Tuesday. "They applauded her, and then he introduced Lucia and me."

                                Throughout the week, team owners and members of ownership families have paused in meeting rooms or the hallways of the posh Breakers hotel to individually pay their respects and offer condolences.

                                "Dan Rooney (Steelers), Bob Kraft (Patriots), Steve Tisch (Giants), John Mara (Giants), Dean Spanos (Chargers) — a lot of people," Rosenbloom said. "I can list practically everybody. People have been so nice with their fond memories of my mom. It's been a very touching trip here. ... It's just too bad she wasn't here to hear the warmth and respect that other people have for her."

                                And for Rosenbloom, some habits are hard to break.

                                "After (Monday's) meetings, I went...
                                -04-02-2008, 01:53 AM
                              • Guest's Avatar
                                For the Rams fan that thinks he has nothing left to learn about the Rams
                                by Guest
                                For those who are new to the stench its important that you know the whole Frontiere story.

                                the good stuff is at the bottom.
                                Dominic Frontiere


                                Born 17 June 1931, New Haven, Connecticut



                                Dom Frontiere qualifies for mention on four counts:


                                As jazz accordionist and combo leader
                                As mastermind behind The Mighty Accordion Band
                                As composer of the exotica classic, "Pagan Festival"
                                As composer of numerous film and television scores

                                Frontiere grew up in a musical family, learning several instruments before adopting the accordion as his main focus. He proved a prodigy, and was travelling to New York for lessons with accordion virtuoso Joseph Biviano at 7 and performing solo at Carnegie Hall at the age of 12. From an early age, Frontiere's interest in music went beyond just performing, though, and he studied classical music, arranging, and composition through high school and after.
                                He joined Horace Heidt's big band in 1949, replacing accordion star Dick Contino (who later recorded for Mercury in the 1950s) and becoming lead arranger as well. He left Heidt in 1952 and moved to Hollywood, where he studied with Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco at UCLA and with violinist and studio conductor Felix Slatkin. Frontiere was taken under the wing of Alfred Newman, Music Director at 20th Century-Fox studios, and his brother, film composer Lionel Newman, who soon had him working steadily on a variety of scoring jobs.

                                Frontiere also participated in heyday of the West Coast jazz, forming a sextet that included Jack Marshall on guitar. He recorded several albums for Liberty. Along with Art Van Damme and Johnny Hamlin, he ranks among the leading (and only) jazz accordionists.

                                Frontiere experimented with several novelties as diversions from his studio work. One was an album for Columbia, "Pagan Festival," that is now recalled fondly as one of the prime examples of "true" exotica. As its liner notes state, "Pagan Festival" is an "interpretation of ancient Inca rituals, superstitions, and the romance and mysteries of their colorful civilization." One suspects he ran Yma Sumac's albums for a few spins while conceiving on the pieces on this work, which feature such titles as "Temple of Suicide," "Jaguar God," and "Venus Girl."

                                A year or two after "Pagan Festival," Frontiere dived into the stereo spectacular wave, producing and arranging an album for Capitol that featured a band of twenty-some accordions. "They said it couldn't be done . . . The Mighty Accordion Band" showed a gorilla playing an accordion on the cover and included rousing renditions of such exotica standards as "Caravan."

                                Frontiere has concentrated on composing for films and television since the early 1960s....
                                -03-10-2005, 08:33 AM
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