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  • Quote from Steve Rosenbloom

    In another thread we were discussing the business end of Rosenblooms decision. This further emphasises that Rosenbloom DID want georgia to have the team. Steve Rosenbloom explains why.

    <BEGIN>

    Carroll's offspring from an earlier marriage had begun, as a teenager, doing Colts laundry. Rosenbloom figured to be succeeded by his kid as franchise boss. By now, so much has become estranged. Steve and Georgia don't speak.

    "My dad should be able to see what's happened to his legacy," Steve told the Post-Dispatch. He lives north of New Orleans in Covington, La. "Dad wasn't dead 15 minutes and she was in her glory.

    "Dad told me he was trying to take advantage of the widows tax exemption (by making Georgia the prime beneficiary). He said he'd rather trust Georgia to do the right thing than to battle with Uncle Sam. He expected her to sit home and do the social things."

    <End>
    source St. Petersburgh Times
    http://www.stpetersburgtimes.com/New...d_road_t.shtml

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  • RamWraith
    Restoring Rams to greatness would honor mother's legacy
    by RamWraith
    By Bernie Miklasz
    ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
    Thursday, Feb. 28 2008

    NEW YORK — Chip Rosenbloom was 14 when his father, Carroll Rosenbloom, drowned
    in the rough surf near the family's beachfront home in South Florida. Chip was
    on the beach, the last person to see his father alive before the elder
    Rosenbloom disappeared into the waves.

    Rosenbloom perished on April 2, 1979. But the traumatic experience haunts Chip
    to this day; he still speaks about it with a sense of shock. But the tragedy
    brought Chip Rosenbloom even closer to his mother, Georgia Frontiere, who owned
    the Rams until her death on Jan. 18.

    Chip and his mother had an incredibly tight bond. She was not only a nurturing
    mother, but a best friend. Frontiere spent the final five-plus months of her
    life in the hospital, trying desperately but unsuccessfully to survive the
    devastation of

    terminal breast cancer, and Chip was there with her.

    During those five agonizing months, Chip maintained a bedside vigil for all but
    seven days. And on four of those days, he was absent only because his mother
    demanded that he get away to rest and be with his family.

    As Rosenbloom watched over his mother, he put his successful film career on
    hold. His wife, Kathleen, and their son Alexander, 14, and daughter Olivia, 10,
    spent many hours at the hospital. But in many respects, Chip and his sister,
    Lucia Rodriguez, had to go this alone.

    "There were moments of incredible hopes where we felt like she was going to
    pull through and we'd have many years with her," Rosenbloom said. "And then
    there were moments of incredible sadness. It was a really rough time, roughest
    time I've ever been through. I guarantee you my sister would say the same thing.

    "At 14, losing my dad was obviously very traumatic. It was so sudden. I
    couldn't imagine a world that my dad wasn't in. In my mom's case, you talk
    about her beauty, her vitality, her charisma, her energy, just everything. She
    was so amazing and inspiring, and in the hospital, she still had that. I mean,
    you look at her face and you say, 'She shouldn't be here.'""''

    Rosenbloom, 45, is the Rams' new managing partner and de facto owner. But he's
    still grieving over his mother's death. He traveled to New York this week to
    meet NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, but there was a more soulful reason for
    the trip: Chip and Kathleen stayed in Georgia's Manhattan apartment, and sorted
    through her belongings in preparation of closing another period of her life. It
    saddened Chip, but his mood rallies.

    "To my mother, to Georgia," Rosenbloom said as he raised a toast Monday night
    at Frontiere's favorite Italian...
    -02-28-2008, 05:46 AM
  • RamWraith
    Restoring Rams to greatness would honor his mother's legacy
    by RamWraith
    By Bernie Miklasz
    ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
    02/28/2008

    Sports Columnist Bernie Miklasz


    NEW YORK — Chip Rosenbloom was 14 when his father, Carroll Rosenbloom, drowned in the rough surf near the family's beachfront home in South Florida. Chip was on the beach, the last person to see his father alive before the elder Rosenbloom disappeared into the waves.

    Rosenbloom perished on April 2, 1979. But the traumatic experience haunts Chip to this day; he still speaks about it with a sense of shock. But the tragedy brought Chip Rosenbloom even closer to his mother, Georgia Frontiere, who owned the Rams until her death on Jan. 18.

    Chip and his mother had an incredibly tight bond. She was not only a nurturing mother, but a best friend. Frontiere spent the final five-plus months of her life in the hospital, trying desperately but unsuccessfully to survive the devastation of

    terminal breast cancer, and Chip was there with her.

    During those five agonizing months, Chip maintained a bedside vigil for all but seven days. And on four of those days, he was absent only because his mother demanded that he get away to rest and be with his family.

    As Rosenbloom watched over his mother, he put his successful film career on hold. His wife, Kathleen, and their son Alexander, 14, and daughter Olivia, 10, spent many hours at the hospital. But in many respects, Chip and his sister, Lucia Rodriguez, had to go this alone.

    "There were moments of incredible hopes where we felt like she was going to pull through and we'd have many years with her," Rosenbloom said. "And then there were moments of incredible sadness. It was a really rough time, roughest time I've ever been through. I guarantee you my sister would say the same thing.

    "At 14, losing my dad was obviously very traumatic. It was so sudden. I couldn't imagine a world that my dad wasn't in. In my mom's case, you talk about her beauty, her vitality, her charisma, her energy, just everything. She was so amazing and inspiring, and in the hospital, she still had that. I mean, you look at her face and you say, 'She shouldn't be here.' "

    Rosenbloom, 43, is the Rams' new managing partner and de facto owner. But he's still grieving over his mother's death. He traveled to New York this week to meet NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, but there was a more soulful reason for the trip: Chip and Kathleen stayed in Georgia's Manhattan apartment, and sorted through her belongings in preparation of closing another period of her life. It saddened Chip, but his mood rallies.

    "To my mother, to Georgia," Rosenbloom said as he raised a toast Monday night at Frontiere's favorite Italian restaurant. "This is what she would want, to see everyone together and being happy." MORE BERNIE


    After Frontiere's...
    -03-01-2008, 06:26 AM
  • Guest's Avatar
    Avenger Post this at the Herd Board RE: The last person to see Rosenbloom alive.
    by Guest
    From "The League. The rise and decline of the NFL":

    The last person to see Carroll Rosenbloom alive was one Raymond Tanguay, a middle-aged French-Canadian tourist. Tanguay was standing on the beach. Rosenbloom was at least 150 yards out to sea, screaming for help. The Canadian charged into the water and fought his way out to where C.R. was, but his heroism was to no avail. Tanguay later estimated that Rosenbloom had been floating face down for 5 minutes before he reached him. "I took out a piece of wood," he remembered. "Three times I put the man on the wood, but every time the big rough wave take the man again into the water. I don't know how far out I was, but the people looked far, far away. I wanted to save him. I did everything I could, but it was not enough. I didn't catch him at a good time. The water was too much rough."

    Someone called the Golden Beach police about 2:00 PM and the chief and another officer rushed down to the water. "When we got to the beach," the chief reported, "we saw two men in heavy surf about 150 yards from the beach. One man was trying to support the other. We took off our clothes and went in the water, but by the time we got there, the other man was near exhaustion. There was no apparent sign of life [in Rosenbloom] when we got to him." Before Rosenbloom's body could be brought ashore, the rescuers were dragged almost 150 yards north along the face of the beach by the heavy seas.

    Georgia Rosenbloom was notified shortly thereafter. According to one source close to the Rosenbloom's, her first call was to Hugh Culverhouse, owner of the Tampa franchise and executor of Rosenbloom's estate. Culverhouse soon notified Rozelle. The commissioner, in turn, notified the rest of the league. "Everyone was very shocked that Carroll had died like that," remembered Rozelle. "No one could understand the drowning because Carroll had lived there in Golden Beach off and on for several years. They couldn't understand it." Gene Klein's response was typical. "I was shocked," he admitted. "Carroll wasn't a strong swimmer. It's hard to fathom him going out in the ocean in those circumstances." Still somewhat stunned, Rozelle spoke with the press that afternoon. "Carroll Rosenbloom played a major role in the growth and success of the NFL," the commissioner observed, "both through the teams he produced and through his active participation in the league's decision making process. We had some differences over things in the League that he felt affected his team adversely. I was very pleased that in the recent months it was considered past and gone and we had a very close relationship."

    Steve Rosenbloom learned of his father’s death after returning to the Rams offices on Pico Blvd. from an errand in the San Fernando Valley. When he walked in, Steve's pregnant wife, Renee, was there...
    -07-15-2004, 02:04 AM
  • MauiRam
    Rams owner Chip Rosenbloom checks in ..
    by MauiRam
    Team's new owners make the rounds at NFL meetings
    By Jim Thomas
    ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
    04/02/2008

    Rams owner Chip Rosenbloom

    PALM BEACH, Fla. — As a neophyte NFL owner, Chip Rosenbloom experienced at least one "rookie" moment at the league meetings this week in Florida.

    Standing in a meeting room with sister Lucia Rodriguez and Rams executive vice president Bob Wallace, Rosenbloom's mind was elsewhere during the perfunctory team-by-team roll call.

    "I didn't even hear 'St. Louis' called," Rosenbloom said, smiling. "And I hear Bob Wallace say, 'Yes.'"

    That is "yes," as in present and accounted for, which also sums up Rosenbloom's first NFL meeting as a Rams owner. Advertisement

    Over the years, Rosenbloom has attended about 15 of these meetings, but many were as a child tagging along with his late mother (Georgia Frontiere), or late father (Carroll Rosenbloom).

    He also has attended several of these meetings later as an adult, including last year's gathering in Phoenix.

    Those times, he was in the meeting rooms rubbing elbows with owners and executives as league matters were discussed.

    But this week is different, serving as his official introduction as a Rams owner.

    "Last year, when I went to the meetings, people knew me as Georgia's son," Rosenbloom said. "And this year, Lucia and I are here as the owners of the team. It was a different experience definitely."

    Rosenbloom and Rodriguez inherited the family's 60 percent share of the team when Frontiere died of breast cancer Jan. 18. Rosenbloom has the franchise's controlling vote.

    On behalf of the NFL, Commissioner Roger Goodell paid his respects to Frontiere during his opening address Monday.

    According to Rosenbloom, Goodell told the group that the NFL had lost part of the family and that Frontiere was a wonderful, optimistic and inspiring person.

    "It was very nice. And sad," Rosenbloom said Tuesday. "They applauded her, and then he introduced Lucia and me."

    Throughout the week, team owners and members of ownership families have paused in meeting rooms or the hallways of the posh Breakers hotel to individually pay their respects and offer condolences.

    "Dan Rooney (Steelers), Bob Kraft (Patriots), Steve Tisch (Giants), John Mara (Giants), Dean Spanos (Chargers) — a lot of people," Rosenbloom said. "I can list practically everybody. People have been so nice with their fond memories of my mom. It's been a very touching trip here. ... It's just too bad she wasn't here to hear the warmth and respect that other people have for her."

    And for Rosenbloom, some habits are hard to break.

    "After (Monday's) meetings, I went...
    -04-02-2008, 12:53 AM
  • BigGameMN
    Georgia has passed
    by BigGameMN
    R.I.P. Georgia....
    -01-18-2008, 05:46 PM
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