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  • Archuleta keeps going forward at top speed

    By Bill Coats
    Of the Post-Dispatch
    Friday, Aug. 27 2004


    Rams strong safety Adam Archuleta watched forlornly from the middle of the
    field on Jan. 10 as the No. 89 on the back of Carolina wideout Steve Smith
    streaked toward the end zone.

    Just like that, the season was over, snuffed by the Panthers' 29-23
    double-overtime victory at Edward Jones Dome in the second round of the
    playoffs. It wasn't supposed to happen that way.

    The Rams were the NFC West champions, and their 12-4 record included an 8-0
    sweep at the Dome that extended their home winning streak to 14 games. They
    were favored over the Panthers, yet their hopes of reaching a third Super Bowl
    in five years were quashed by the 69-yard pass play - quarterback Jake Delhomme
    to Smith - that split the Rams defense and fractured their psyche.

    That vision lingered, Archuleta acknowledged. But not for long.

    "You can't dwell on stuff," he said. "Every time something bad happens in your
    life, you've got to look at it, examine it, figure out why it happened, how you
    can change it, and then you've got to move on with your life. Because no
    progress is made by looking at the past."

    Such has been the mantra for Archuleta since he joined the Arizona State squad
    as a walk-on, developed into a two-time All-Pacific 10 Conference linebacker,
    and became the Rams' first-round draft choice (No. 20 overall) in 2001: No
    looking back, no second-guessing, no regrets.

    "There are very few things in life that get me down," said Archuleta. "I've
    been blessed to be able to have that attitude throughout life. ... You've just
    got to live, wake up every day and do what you feel like, and let the chips
    fall where they may."

    As low key as Archuleta seems - and truly is, according to close pal Rich
    Coady, a fellow Rams safety - away from the game, his on-field demeanor
    provides a direct contrast. He flies to the ball with vengeance and hits with
    ferocity.

    "It's an explosion," said free safety Aeneas Williams, a future Hall of Famer
    who is heading into his 14th NFL season. "He gets to the ball fast, he plays in
    space well, and he's a very good blitzer. He's a tackling machine as well."

    Archuleta maintains his physical skills through an unusual workout regimen -
    developed by fellow Chandler, Ariz., resident Jay Schroeder - that he's been
    following for nearly a decade. The routine, designed to control muscle response
    and increase explosiveness, has helped the 215-pound Archuleta add about 40
    pounds of muscle to his 6-foot frame, increase his bench press to more than 500
    pounds, and lower his 40-yard time to just under 4.4 seconds from 4.9.

    "That's what got me here, and as long as I'm playing in the NFL, that's what
    I'm going to be doing," Archuleta said. "I don't think there's any other way to
    work out. I'd regress as a player if I didn't."

    Archuleta, who has started 41 of the 42 games in which he's appeared over three
    seasons, collected 81 tackles as a rookie, a team-high 149 in 2002 and 101 last
    year, when he missed three games with an ankle injury. "He's doing nothing but
    continually getting better," Williams said. "His potential is off the charts."

    Individual progress is high on Archuleta's list of priorities. "You just want
    to keep advancing your game," he said. "You never want to be the same, you
    don't want to be complacent. Whatever you've been able to do in the past, you
    try to build on that and just expand yourself as a player."

    Part of that process encompasses his increasing role as a leader on a defensive
    unit that is under new leadership, with Larry Marmie having succeeded Lovie
    Smith as coordinator. "That's a responsibility of mine, and that's my role on
    this team," Archuleta said. "It's something that I'll progress into as the
    season goes on and as my career goes on."


    A walk-on success

    As an All-Valley linebacker and running back at Chandler High, Archuleta
    expected to have a nice assortment of college offers from which to choose.
    Instead, he had none.

    "At the time, I was shocked. It was a letdown," he said. "But that was just the
    path that I had to take. As I look back on it, that made me a better football
    player. It's allowed me to welcome adversity in my life and not to shy away
    from it, and understand that if things don't work out in your favor, you've got
    to have the perseverance and the vision to fight through it."

    Archuleta could have gone to a small school, or even junior college. He chose
    to walk on at Arizona State, just down the road in Tempe. Now well into his
    work with Schroeder, Archuleta used a redshirt season to create enough of an
    impression to earn a scholarship. He played in every game the next year and was
    a starter his last three seasons.

    "I was actually blessed to be a walk-on," he said. "It made me have that focus,
    and it really tested my fortitude, to see if I could really go through it and
    see if I had what it takes to get to this level. A lot of character
    development, a lot of development as a player, work ethic, discipline -
    everything that has to go into it - helped me become the player that I am
    today."


    Brains and brawn

    That player, according to Coady, is one who deftly applies his obvious physical
    ability with a cerebral dexterity that might not be so evident to casual
    observers.

    "He's very intelligent out there," Coady said. "He understands the game of
    football, understands the defense. A lot of guys really home in on their
    specific position, but he can tell you where all 11 people are supposed to be
    on every play."

    That skill jumped out quickly at coach Mike Martz. "We've thrown him into a
    role since he was a rookie, in terms of leadership and making plays and being
    an impact player, that's way too much to ask of any rookie," Martz explained.
    "But we did that with him, and he responded very well. . . . . The passion and
    the love for playing this game and his competitiveness is just hard to find. As
    good as everybody else is in the National Football League, guys like Adam are
    just truly unique."

    Individually, the next step is a Pro Bowl spot. But more important, Archuleta
    emphasized, is advancing as a team so that he never again has to witness
    another gut-wrenching scene like the one in January at the dome.

    "That game is an example of how difficult it is in the NFL to go all the way,"
    he said. The Rams have such promise again this year, he said.

    "We have the makings of a great football team," Archuleta said. "We've got to
    let the personality of our team develop throughout the season, but you look at
    it on paper, we're where we want to be."

  • #2
    Re: Archuleta keeps going forward at top speed

    Originally posted by RamWraith
    By Bill Coats
    Of the Post-Dispatch
    Friday, Aug. 27 2004

    Archuleta maintains his physical skills through an unusual workout regimen -
    developed by fellow Chandler, Ariz., resident Jay Schroeder - that he's been
    following for nearly a decade. The routine, designed to control muscle response and increase explosiveness....

    "That's what got me here, and as long as I'm playing in the NFL, that's what I'm going to be doing," Archuleta said. "I don't think there's any other way to work out. I'd regress as a player if I didn't."
    I'd be curious to know what tempted the FO to use a draft pick on Arch in the 1st place. The routine he follows sounds like some of the commonest sense to come along in some time.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Archuleta keeps going forward at top speed

      When ESPN did their draft pick analysis and showed the video on him, he became my favorite Ram and he's done nothing to change that. He's a beast. You're right adarian, there should be more people doing that.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Archuleta keeps going forward at top speed

        With as much as he has played at the line, I wonder if it wouldn't serve him to add another 20-30LBs and move permanently up to Linebacker.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Archuleta keeps going forward at top speed

          I know I've posted this before, but Archuleta is already bulked up. If he didn't do those crazy workouts, he'd be like 175lbs. (what is he at, 215lbs I think?) I just don't think there's any way he could get to 235+ lbs.

          But the way some of our LB's play, let's just put him there anyway!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Archuleta keeps going forward at top speed

            Originally posted by sbramfan
            I know I've posted this before, but Archuleta is already bulked up. If he didn't do those crazy workouts, he'd be like 175lbs. (what is he at, 215lbs I think?) I just don't think there's any way he could get to 235+ lbs.

            But the way some of our LB's play, let's just put him there anyway!
            Well, I am keeping my fingers crossed that this year is when he starts reminding people of Ronnie Lott.

            Comment

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            • RamWraith
              Back ailment has hindered Archuleta
              by RamWraith
              By Bill Coats
              Of the Post-Dispatch
              Sunday, Nov. 28 2004

              Ask Rams strong safety Adam Archuleta how his troublesome back is feeling these
              days, and you'll get a sly grin and this measured response: "It's all right.
              It's been worse."

              True, it has been worse.

              A bulging disc in his lower back caused him to miss two starts last month, when
              he was reduced to duty in the nickel and dime packages against San Francisco
              and Seattle. Before that, Archuleta had started 44 of 45 games in his four NFL
              seasons.

              Being limited in any way rankles Archuleta, whose game is rooted in high-speed
              sprints and high-impact hits.

              "He's an emotional leader, just by how he plays and the aggressiveness he
              brings to the defense," Rams coach Mike Martz said.

              For much of this season, though, Archuleta's explosiveness has been neutralized
              somewhat by his back problems.

              "He's managed it pretty well ... (but) he's taken a step back occasionally,"
              Martz said. "I always know when it's bothering him, because you can just tell
              by how he moves around."

              Archuleta, who turned 27 on Saturday, has remained productive. His 85 tackles
              rank second on the team to linebacker Pisa Tinoisamoa's 95.

              Archuleta's 8 1/2 tackles-per-game pace would put him at 136 by season's end
              and would be the second-highest total (he had 149 in 2002) for the former
              Arizona State walk-on. Free safety Aeneas Williams calls Archuleta "a tackling
              machine."

              But Archuleta has been less of a disruptive force than in the past, recording
              just one sack and four tackles-for-loss. He said his back "tightens up on me
              and doesn't allow me to move as well as I'd like to move."

              Archuleta doesn't want any pity parties held in his honor, though.

              "I'm not a guy who likes to sit here and make excuses," he said. "Everybody
              knows it's a lot more ideal situation to play in the NFL when you're healthy.
              But the reality of it is, are you ever really going to be healthy? It's just
              something that's part of the job. ...

              "Once you've hurt a back during the season, it's not going to go away. You've
              just got to get it to the point where you can still play and be effective and
              be accountable to your teammates."

              Don't mistake Archuleta's philosophical stance, however: He's plenty
              frustrated.

              "It's not something I'm used to," he said. "For whatever reasons, I haven't
              felt like myself. Whether that's the back or whether it's ... who knows?"

              Fellow safety Rich Coady, who started in Archuleta's place vs....
              -11-28-2004, 05:39 AM
            • Guest's Avatar
              Back ailment has hindered Archuleta
              by Guest
              Back ailment has hindered Archuleta
              By Bill Coats
              Of the Post-Dispatch
              11/28/2004

              The Rams' Adam Archuleta gets one of his 85 tackles this season, stopping the Patriots' David Givens on Nov. 7. He's on pace for 136, which would be his second-highest pro total.
              (Elsa/Getty Images)


              Ask Rams strong safety Adam Archuleta how his troublesome back is feeling these days, and you'll get a sly grin and this measured response: "It's all right. It's been worse."

              True, it has been worse.

              A bulging disc in his lower back caused him to miss two starts last month, when he was reduced to duty in the nickel and dime packages against San Francisco and Seattle. Before that, Archuleta had started 44 of 45 games in his four NFL seasons.

              Being limited in any way rankles Archuleta, whose game is rooted in high-speed sprints and high-impact hits.

              "He's an emotional leader, just by how he plays and the aggressiveness he brings to the defense," Rams coach Mike Martz said.

              For much of this season, though, Archuleta's explosiveness has been neutralized somewhat by his back problems.

              "He's managed it pretty well ... (but) he's taken a step back occasionally," Martz said. "I always know when it's bothering him, because you can just tell by how he moves around."

              Archuleta, who turned 27 on Saturday, has remained productive. His 85 tackles rank second on the team to linebacker Pisa Tinoisamoa's 95.

              Archuleta's 8 1/2 tackles-per-game pace would put him at 136 by season's end and would be the second-highest total (he had 149 in 2002) for the former Arizona State walk-on. Free safety Aeneas Williams calls Archuleta "a tackling machine."

              But Archuleta has been less of a disruptive force than in the past, recording just one sack and four tackles-for-loss. He said his back "tightens up on me and doesn't allow me to move as well as I'd like to move."

              Archuleta doesn't want any pity parties held in his honor, though.

              "I'm not a guy who likes to sit here and make excuses," he said. "Everybody knows it's a lot more ideal situation to play in the NFL when you're healthy. But the reality of it is, are you ever really going to be healthy? It's just something that's part of the job. ...

              "Once you've hurt a back during the season, it's not going to go away. You've just got to get it to the point where you can still play and be effective and be accountable to your teammates."

              Don't mistake Archuleta's philosophical stance, however: He's plenty frustrated.

              "It's not something I'm used to," he said. "For whatever reasons, I haven't felt like myself. Whether that's the back or whether it's ... who knows?" ...
              -11-28-2004, 11:26 PM
            • ArchuletaFan31
              Fear Adam Archuleta May Not Possess It, But His Opponents Do
              by ArchuletaFan31
              Fear

              Adam Archuleta May Not Possess It, But His Opponents Do

              By Nick Wagoner
              Staff Writer

              Most kids spend their adolescent years learning how to deal with pain. Whether it is the physical kind of pain suffered from falling off a bike or the kind where they must learn about how to deal with the loss of a loved one, important lessons are gleaned from everywhere. Most kids are like that… most.

              Adam Archuleta was always the exception. Pain is not a word that is in his vocabulary. He was always “that” kid, the kid who would scrape his knee and laugh about it. He wouldn’t let much of anything bother him.

              He didn’t care much for people in charge and he was always looking to do something to challenge the system. It was just his way. More than that, he could easily shake off any kind of physical pain.

              Archuleta recalls the time when he was 4 and decided to ride his bike on an icy hill, by no means a safe idea. Of course, Archuleta fell off his bike and by the time he landed, he had his first concussion, the first of many. He wasn’t bothered, though; he simply went to the hospital and got over it. That’s the way he has always been; think outside the box, confront the people with clout and defy common thought.

              “I was always getting hurt,” Archuleta said. “I was not really afraid of anything. I used to ride my bike down the tall slides. I’d fall off and get bloodied up. I used to jump off the roof. I used to do whatever; it was just kind of how it was when I was a kid.”

              Based on those qualities you might think Archuleta is simply crazy. Make no mistake, he is one of the most interesting and intelligent players in the NFL, but he couldn’t do what he does on a weekly basis without that kind of mentality. He couldn’t do what he did to get where he is either.

              Archuleta took his fearless approach to life, applied it to football and became one of the league’s most feared safeties. He will never hesitate to stick his nose in and make contact. In fact, he doesn’t care if he is the one dishing out the pain or receiving it.

              “Maybe I was just being bred for contact,” Archuleta said. “It could have been somebody’s way of preparing me for the NFL.”

              That preparation for contact and the sheer enjoyment of the game has always been omnipresent in Archuleta. Never the biggest, the fastest or the strongest, he got by on will. It was that will that took him from walk-on at Arizona State to three-year starter for the Sun Devils. It helped him play linebacker though he was undersized at about 200 pounds for the position. It resulted in 330 tackles.

              In the end, his desire lifted him from lowly walk-on to the 20th pick in the 2001 NFL Draft by the St. Louis Rams. He switched from linebacker to strong safety because of his size. But standing 5-foot-11 and weighing 209 pounds, Archuleta still has...
              -11-17-2004, 02:50 PM
            • RamWraith
              Doesn't sound like Archuleta liked us :-(
              by RamWraith
              For Redskins' Archuleta, An Imposing Body of Work

              The Washington Post
              By Jason La Canfora
              June 18, 2006 Adam is a very special individual because he has used all the tools that God gave him The truck rolled down a quiet residential street, while Adam Archuleta clung to a jury-rigged handle affixed to its rear, running for dear life to keep up. Of all the crazy things Archuleta's trainer, Jay Schroeder, had concocted in the name of improving his fitness, this was surely the most bizarre. But Archuleta, then a wide-eyed teenager, went along willingly.

              These were the early days of the Archuleta-Schroeder relationship. Archuleta was a junior at Chandler High School in Arizona. That he would soon dominate the Pacific-10 as a linebacker at Arizona State, then get drafted 20th overall by the St. Louis Rams, convert to a defensive back and become the highest-paid safety in NFL history when the Washington Redskins signed him in March was unimaginable at the time.

              To Archuleta, Schroeder and his unconventional tactics provided his best -- if not only -- chance of playing pro football, so he turned over his mind, body and soul to the trainer. No task was refused, no command ignored, even when it came to running 100-yard bursts while clenching a moving automobile for up to a half-mile at a time.

              "From Day One, Jay has had me do some wild stuff," said Archuleta, who signed a six-year, $30 million contract with Washington. "And from Day One, for whatever reason, I did everything he told me to, when he told me to do it, in the way he told me to do it. There was complete faith and trust in what he was saying, and I don't think there was ever a point where I doubted anything. It was always, 'Okay, cool, whatever I have to do. Sometimes it kind of looks crazy, but let's do it.' "

              Twelve years after his relationship with Schroeder began, Archuleta, 28, is the newest cog in Redskins assistant head coach Gregg Williams's defense. He is tough, yet unassuming off the field. He has the skills to attack the football, and with the study habits and smarts to master Williams's playbook.

              One of Williams's sons is a devotee of Archuleta's workout video, "Freak of Training," and spoke about the safety's prowess to his father for years. Archuleta, meantime, was tired of playing for St. Louis, a finesse, offense-oriented franchise, a close friend said. He wanted a new team that stressed defense.

              "He kind of has a chip on his shoulder coming in here," Williams said. "I love those guys. Those are the kinds of guys that are easy to coach because there's an automatic match for a blend. The mentality that he's been raised on in his offseason program, the toughness of his trainer, and the toughness of paying the price in peace so you don't bleed as much in war, he sees that's already a unified part of our defense, so it was...
              -06-19-2006, 05:27 AM
            • RamWraith
              Archuleta likes "career" change
              by RamWraith
              By Jim Thomas
              Of the Post-Dispatch
              08/24/2005

              Sure, Adam Archuleta was surprised that his "career" at free safety lasted all of one exhibition game. But you always can expect the unexpected at Rams Park, particularly in August.

              "We're trying to sort through some things and sort through some personnel," Archuleta said. "So it's better now than in the middle of the season."

              Coach Mike Martz announced Monday that Archuleta was moving back to strong safety, the position he has played in the NFL since being selected by the Rams in the first round of the 2001 draft.

              "It's going to be a good thing for us, and I think it's going to help our defense," Archuleta said. "I play strong safety. That's what I am. I love playing that position."

              He loves being closer to the line of scrimmage, more involved in run defense and more involved in blitzing.

              "I've always enjoyed being the guy to be able to mix it up," Archuleta said. "To be able to run around and just cause havoc, that's kind of my game. Being a free safety gave me an opportunity to be in on different types of plays. But now, I just like being able to fly around and just have fun. ... That's when I'm at the top of my game."

              One reason for the switch to free safety was concern about his back. He played in pain most of 2004 with an injury that eventually was diagnosed as a herniated disc. The free-safety position involves more coverage and less banging than strong safety, so in theory, the switch would be easier on his back.

              Archuleta said his back came out of Sunday's San Diego game in good shape.

              "Sure, you get sore," he said. "It's the first time I've had a contact since January. Especially full-speed contact. But I was fine working out hard the next day. It felt pretty good."

              Nonetheless, Archuleta felt some anxiety entering the San Diego game, not sure how his back would respond to full contact.

              "Am I going to be able to move around?" he wondered. "I started the game out pretty stiff, but as the game went along, I loosened up, and everything started working better, and I was flying around better. So it was definitely a step in the right direction."

              Unfortunately for Archuleta and the Rams, running back LaDainian Tomlinson came streaking into the secondary on San Diego's fifth offensive play, long before Archuleta got loosened up.

              Tomlinson easily eluded Archuleta with an open-field fake and raced to the end zone for a 55-yard touchdown. Given the amount of space Tomlinson had to work with, could anyone have brought him down in the open field?

              "It depends on who you ask," Archuleta said.

              In comments after the game, Martz said he thought Archuleta should...
              -08-25-2005, 05:57 AM
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