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The Way I See It.

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  • The Way I See It.

    The Rams defense was able to force 3 early turnovers and rattle Seattle QB Matt Hasselback. However, Hasselback being the NFL star that he is, shook those int's off and turned in a good performance.

    Marc Bulger on the other hand did his usual - nothing. He did not throw any picks, but of course, threw no touchdowns. As a result, the offense could not get the running game going. The offensive line did struggle with pressure, but Hasselback under similar heat somehow managed to score 3 touchdowns.
    • Bulger was 16-34 for 184 yards and of course no scores. He never scores.
    • Hasselback on the hand, shakes off 2 int's to go 25 of 36 for 279 yards and 3 touchdowns.

    Had the Rams been able to muster anything through the air, the running game would have opened up and eventually touchdowns would have ensued.

    Until the get the passing game going, it's going to be a long season. I'm not sure Bulger has it anymore. We are down to another offensive system and year. Don't forget Bulger's coordinator-killer list;

    • Steve Fairchild
    • Scott Linehan
    • Al Saunders

    Pat Shurmur next?

  • #2
    Re: The Way I See It.

    Anybody who blames the lack of offensive production on Bulger this game is plain seriously stupid ...

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: The Way I See It.

      It's obvious we have a lot of work to do. The offense was dreadful with plenty of blame to be shared. We hurt ourselves with penalties- none more damaging than the 12 men on the field negating a blocked field goal return for a TD. We showed no poise or resolve. We gave up another long run for a touchdown. We were unable to convert any of the three turnovers our defense gave us into points- which always spells trouble. Josh Brown missed a makeable FG.

      I'm not even getting into the Bulger thing- enough has been said already, and my positions are a matter of record on the forum.

      Contrast today's performance with that of San Francisco- another divisional team who struggled last year- versus the defending NFC Champs. We're far from being ready, and it looks like a rough ride for the forseeable future. In addition, the schedule makers did us no favors, with 3 of the first 4 on the road.

      One positive: James Laurinitis is going to be a helluva player. Today we received a small taste of what this guy can be.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: The Way I See It.

        Why is no one giving the Wide Receivers any problems. How many plays did Bulger have to throw it away because there were no options. Let's just face the facts. We went into this season short on talent in the wide receiver and we knew it. Bulger can't do anything if he has no targets. Let's give him a few games to let his receivers get on the same page as him. If nothing happens then, then maybe it's time to start complaining about our quarterback.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: The Way I See It.

          btimsah: You do know that Spags wants us to be a run FIRST team right? The run is supposed to open up the passing game for this team, not the other way around. I have no idea about what exactly was failing today on offense, because I didn't watch it, but my bet would be that the offensive line got owned, by penalties and the chickens.
          I believe!:ram:

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: The Way I See It.

            I have to agree. Bulger had more than 5 plays where he held on to the ball for about 3 or 4 seconds, and then scrambled to by more time and still did not have a target. The problem is that the receivers are to young to know how to escape their routes and come back to the quarterback, and there is absolutely no safety blanket for bulger. We need our rb's and te's to play like seattle's did for bulger to have success.

            Our offensive scheme was weird. Its a west coast offense with limited plays to tight ends and almost no wr or rb screens. This should be 70% of our passing offense.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: The Way I See It.

              i am in total shock we didnt utilize stephen jackson to the fullest...

              shocked...

              shocked...

              see above for how i feel about it... shocked..

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: The Way I See It.

                Originally posted by codeman123 View Post
                I have to agree. Bulger had more than 5 plays where he held on to the ball for about 3 or 4 seconds, and then scrambled to by more time and still did not have a target. The problem is that the receivers are to young to know how to escape their routes and come back to the quarterback, and there is absolutely no safety blanket for bulger. We need our rb's and te's to play like seattle's did for bulger to have success.

                Our offensive scheme was weird. Its a west coast offense with limited plays to tight ends and almost no wr or rb screens. This should be 70% of our passing offense.


                i agree.... what the heck do you think happened ??


                hopefully what we saw wasnt the game plan...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: The Way I See It.

                  Originally posted by longfan View Post
                  i am in total shock we didnt utilize stephen jackson to the fullest...

                  shocked...

                  shocked...

                  see above for how i feel about it... shocked..
                  Exactly. Jackson should've been up more around 26 carries....

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: The Way I See It.

                    Originally posted by RamsInfiniti View Post
                    Anybody who blames the lack of offensive production on Bulger this game is plain seriously stupid ...
                    RamsInfiniti, do you not realize he's our starting QB? I don't understand how one cannot blame the starting qb of an offense that got shut out.

                    Why is it so easy for you and others to turn on your typical list of non-Bulgers to blame, such as the offensive line and the receivers, but NEVER the QB himself? How is that possible?

                    You can continue to have faith that he'll return to some magical player you remember. But the fact remains that this team (as you've all said) is too bad for a QB like Bulger. He needs a great supporting cast to succeed, and that's even if he can anymore.

                    We don't have that cast, so we need a QB who can create plays on his own. Boller because of his running ability seems like a better fit at this time, if not opening up camp to all three and let the best man win.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: The Way I See It.

                      Originally posted by TekeRam View Post
                      but my bet would be that the offensive line got owned, by penalties and the chickens.
                      Pretty spot on. it was frustrating watching the offense it was very jittery save for a couple of series. :<

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: The Way I See It.

                        Originally posted by codeman123 View Post
                        I have to agree. Bulger had more than 5 plays where he held on to the ball for about 3 or 4 seconds, and then scrambled to by more time and still did not have a target. The problem is that the receivers are to young to know how to escape their routes and come back to the quarterback, and there is absolutely no safety blanket for bulger. We need our rb's and te's to play like seattle's did for bulger to have success.

                        Our offensive scheme was weird. Its a west coast offense with limited plays to tight ends and almost no wr or rb screens. This should be 70% of our passing offense.
                        Wow. Every year with Bulger now, it's the same story. I'm not buying it anymore.

                        Why are you so quick to throw our receivers under the bus, but ignore the fact that Bulger has been stinking it up for years now? It's always everyone else? The offensive scheme is as weird as it was under Al Saunders, Scott Linehan and Steve Fairchild. It's all the same because Bulger is in there. I doubt he'll turn it around anytime soon, either.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: The Way I See It.

                          I think we watched two different games. Bulger had no time to pass and no one was open when he did. Hasselhoff had all the time in the world and only got knocked down one time, while Bulger was on his butt all night.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: The Way I See It.

                            Originally posted by btimsah View Post
                            Wow. Every year with Bulger now, it's the same story. I'm not buying it anymore.

                            Why are you so quick to throw our receivers under the bus, but ignore the fact that Bulger has been stinking it up for years now? It's always everyone else? The offensive scheme is as weird as it was under Al Saunders, Scott Linehan and Steve Fairchild. It's all the same because Bulger is in there. I doubt he'll turn it around anytime soon, either.
                            I never said anything about Bulger's performance. I thought he played horrible, but you cannot seriously be happy with the playcalling. Look at Seattle. They ran alot of screens and Hasselback always had Carlson to throw to. We didn't run well, and we got off the run quickly. Our passing game was the same the entire game and we barely ever had a tightend running downfield, and I never saw an open reciever.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: The Way I See It.

                              This was worse than I imagined it would be. If it were not for the Lions we would have no race this year. Race for the 2nd pick in the Draft.

                              Lord help us.

                              Comment

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                              • Rambos
                                Bulger Headed for Big Year
                                by Rambos
                                Wednesday, October 25, 2006

                                By Nick Wagoner
                                Senior Writer

                                It was only two weeks into the season and Marc Bulger was already hearing the complaints.

                                Some said he wasn’t picking up the offense fast enough, some said the Rams quarterback wasn’t able to adjust to a system different than the only one he had ever known in the NFL. The Rams were 1-1 and the offense had scored a grand total of one touchdown.

                                What a difference a month makes. Following a bit of a slow start that included one game against Denver’s stingy defense, Bulger went on a four-game tear that has him finally getting the recognition he deserves among the best quarterbacks in the league.

                                In addition, his name has even been bandied about by national pundits when discussing not just the Pro Bowl, but the league’s Most Valuable Player Award.

                                Of course, the success of the offense comes as no surprise to Bulger, who reminded everyone ever so patiently that it was just a matter of time before he and the offense began to click,.

                                “I think I made that pretty clear,” Bulger said. “I didn’t mean to, but it kind of turned into that. We have too many guys that have played too long with too much talent in here. We have too many guys that I can’t screw it up that bad. If I can just get them the ball they are going to make something happen. I knew we wouldn’t be one of these teams that can’t move the ball for a first down. I knew things would start clicking eventually.”

                                Clicking might not do justice to the virtuoso quartet of games Bulger posted starting with the Sept. 24 game at Arizona. Although the Rams scored just 16 points in that game, it became clear that Bulger was about to find his groove.

                                Bulger was 21-of-31 for 309 yards and a touchdown for a rating of 110.8. The offense began to show what it could do that day, but it was just a preview of what was to come.

                                “It was probably sometime during the Arizona game where it started clicking a little bit,” Bulger said. “I think it has a lot to do with the coverage they are giving you or the breaks you get. There’s so much that goes into it, but sometime in the Arizona game I think we felt a lot more comfortable and got back to the way we used to do things.”

                                When Bulger talks about getting back to the way the Rams used to do things on offense, he means racking up yards and points and not operating a system similar to the previous one.

                                In fact, the reason it took him a couple of weeks to get rolling had everything to do with the reality that a brand new system and philosophy was being installed. In the old system, Bulger was asked to be a gunslinger, staring down defenses and flinging the ball into tight spots.

                                While Bulger succeeded in that system because of his pinpoint accuracy, it was an open invitation for turnovers and sacks. As easily as Bulger...
                                -10-26-2006, 08:34 AM
                              • RamWraith
                                Bulger prepares for season
                                by RamWraith
                                By Jim Thomas
                                ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
                                Thursday, Sep. 04 2008
                                He has a new left guard and a new center. The left tackle is coming off major
                                shoulder surgery. The wide receiver corps is banged up. At running back, Steven
                                Jackson's next carry will be his first in a game since December. There's a new
                                offensive coordinator in Al Saunders, with a new, "old" system.

                                Other than that, everything is pretty much settled in for Marc Bulger as he
                                embarks on his sixth season as a full-time starter. Bulger's next victory will
                                tie him with Kurt Warner — at 40 — for the most triumphs by a "St. Louis" Rams
                                quarterback.

                                But there are easier places to get a victory than Lincoln Financial Field,
                                where the Rams open the season Sunday against Philadelphia. And easier defenses
                                to defeat than the Eagles unit coached by veteran coordinator Jim Johnson.

                                "They do a ton of things," Bulger said.

                                When asked to provide an Eagles coverage "sampler," Bulger went into
                                quarterback-speak: "They play Cover 1, they play Cover 11, they play Cover 2,
                                they play Cover 8, they play Cover 6, they play Cover 4 ..."

                                So basically all of the "Cover" numbers.

                                "They do all the blitz numbers, too," Bulger joked. "They're disruptive.
                                They're certainly going to win some battles, but we just have to stay away from
                                making any big mistakes."

                                For Bulger, minimizing mistakes means playing like he did in 2006, when he made
                                his second Pro Bowl, as opposed to the nightmare that was 2007 — easily the
                                worst season of his career.

                                "I think you saw a patience (in '06) that you need out of a quarterback," coach
                                Scott Linehan said. "We've got to give him a lot of support and help. We've got
                                to keep him upright in that pocket when we throw the ball. Our running game's
                                got to develop like it did that particular year. And he's got to know that he
                                doesn't have to do it all."

                                The goal is to limit the number of times Bulger gets sacked to 30 or fewer this
                                season. During the four years as a starter that he played at least 12 games,
                                Bulger was sacked an average of 41 times.

                                Saunders has a good track record of protecting quarterbacks as a play-caller.
                                In his seven previous seasons as a coordinator in Kansas City and Washington,
                                Saunders' starting quarterbacks were sacked an average of 28 times a season,
                                and he never had a QB sacked more than 39 times.

                                Bulger thinks 30 or less is a realistic goal.

                                "We're going to try to get the running game going, try to get the quick passes
                                — and we're certainly going to take our shots," Bulger said. "It's up to me...
                                -09-04-2008, 05:31 AM
                              • RamWraith
                                Bulger catches up with passing game
                                by RamWraith
                                By Jim Thomas
                                ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
                                10/26/2006


                                It didn't seem possible during the preseason, when the Rams' starting offensive unit failed to score a touchdown. Or in the early weeks of the regular season, when every game seemed to be a festival of field goals.

                                But Marc Bulger has made the transition to coach Scott Linehan's offense, and has done so in impressive fashion. Bulger has completed at least 61.9 percent of his passes in the past four games. His passer rating has been 110 or higher in each of those contests.

                                He has thrown for 300-plus yards in three of the four games, and has nine TD passes and just one interception in a span that began with a Week 3 victory in Arizona and continued through the Week 6 loss to Seattle.

                                "It's been a difficult transition," offensive coordinator Greg Olson said after the Seattle game. "I'm sure it hasn't been easy. But he's stuck with us, and he's handled it like a true professional."




                                Bulger set a franchise record by throwing 248 consecutive passes without an interception, a streak broken against the Seahawks. As the Rams prepare for Sunday's contest in San Diego, Bulger quietly has moved up to third in the NFL in passer rating (99.8), trailing only Indianapolis' Peyton Manning (103.2) and Philadelphia's Donovan McNabb (101.7).

                                "He has worked very hard at improving his game on a weekly basis," Linehan said. "I gain more and more appreciation for the little things that he does, as far as his accuracy. ... He knows more and more about what we expect as far as still being aggressive, yet at times not making throws that don't need to be made."

                                Bulger shrugs off his numbers.

                                "If the numbers are good, they're good," he said. "If they're not, they're not. But we're 4-2. That's all that matters to me."

                                Undoubtedly, there will be bumps in the road over the final 10 games. San Diego's No. 1-ranked defense presents a formidable challenge. But there's no doubt that Bulger has made a successful switch from the high-risk, high-reward offense of Mike Martz, to the aggressive yet prudent approach of Linehan.

                                "It was frustrating at first," Bulger said. "It took, what, one or two weeks into the regular season? But I think in the big scheme of things that's not a long time, which is nice. Some teams and some offenses take a year or two. We're still early in the season, but I think we've adopted this as our new system, and everyone's getting more comfortable with it and embracing it."



                                So much for the concern — or was it panic? — among fans and the media about the slow-go on offense during August and early September. Bulger's mind-set never wavered. He wasn't concerned. Things would come around.

                                "I think...
                                -10-26-2006, 06:25 AM
                              • RamWraith
                                Bulger Looks Forward
                                by RamWraith
                                Wednesday, September 10, 2008
                                By Nick Wagoner
                                Senior Writer

                                A short memory can go a long way in the NFL. This week, all of the Rams are doing what’s necessary to forget what happened at Philadelphia and focus on what needs to happen this Sunday against the Giants.

                                With no player is that short memory more important than quarterback Marc Bulger. As the guy saddled with the task of making the offense go and this week of revving up a group that was stagnant last week, Bulger has already put the past behind him.

                                “You have to,” Bulger said. “With Coach (Scott) Linehan we have a 24 hour rule around here, win or lose. We came in Monday, beat ourselves up and tried to make as many corrections as we could. Today, we are playing the world champs so if we don’t (forget), it will happen again.”

                                Indeed, Bulger and the Rams will get no passes this weekend as the Giants come calling. Much like the Eagles, New York specializes in finding ways to harass, bruise and batter opposing quarterbacks.

                                For those in need of examples, simply call on the tape of the Giants’ Super Bowl win in which their front seven wreaked havoc on Tom Brady and the Patriots.

                                If the Rams want to bounce back against the Giants and come up with an upset, there will have to be improvements on both sides of the ball. Spearheading any turnaround offensively falls on the shoulders of Bulger.

                                In the immediate aftermath of Sunday’s loss, Bulger was quick to take the blame for the offense’s anemic performance. That group posted 166 total yards and Bulger was 14-of-26 for 158 yards with no touchdowns and no interceptions.

                                It was far from the worst performance of Bulger’s career but it certainly wasn’t his best, either. After spending the rest of Sunday and Monday breaking down film and beating himself up over the effort, Bulger couldn’t wait to get back to work Wednesday.

                                “I love being back here because I want to go out and prove we are not that bad,” Bulger said. “I don’t want to sit here for two weeks if there was a bye week and sit on that loss. The best thing you can do is go back out and play then come back and talk to you guys about a win.”

                                The nature of Bulger’s position dictates that much of the blame will fall on him when the team doesn’t perform. That simply goes with the territory.

                                But Linehan and coach Al Saunders believe Bulger didn’t play as poorly as popular opinion might indicate.

                                “I think his play was indicative of our game,” Linehan said. “It certainly wasn’t his best game. His decisions weren’t as good as they’re going to be in my opinion, but he wasn’t forcing too many things. He was doing a pretty good job of managing the situation, it’s just not good enough to win with, but that’s was our team’s performance, it wasn’t his; it was our team and mine and everybody else. I would like to think...
                                -09-10-2008, 07:43 PM
                              • Guam rammer
                                Toast this coaching staff.
                                by Guam rammer
                                Maybe with the exception of Haslette and Ellard, get rid of everyone. This is unbelievable. I never thought i'd ever say this but our Offense is actually killing our Defense. Linehan is supposed to be this offensive guru but he doesnt know the difference between a pass, a run and how to manage the clock. Heck! we wasted more time in our no-huddle then our huddle and the offense just doesnt look like time is important when your down by 2-3 scores. The O-line can't be used as an excuse anymore. We havent had one for the last 5-6 weeks. If its gonna take him this long to figure that out then we need to get rid of him and his friends now!!!

                                Seattle's running game was stuffed after their 1st series, then we let Hasselbeck borrow Bulgers ribs(thanks Mr. wroten) and everytime we got the ball back, the whole world knew what we were gonna do...give it back!!! One drive looked good, ONE!!! and we got a FG from it, this has been our whole season. The players on offense havent done anything to improve and i find that hard to believe with the guys we put on the field against the Hawks. 2 FG's? The lack of production is a result of a system that just can't figure things out. Maybe the players are trying to tell us something because for seven straight games, this stuffs gotta get old.
                                -10-22-2007, 07:03 AM
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