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Why we didn't get to the endzone..

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  • Why we didn't get to the endzone..

    Here is a segment of an article by Jeff Gordon from stltoday.com that I thought was pretty interesting.

    The Rams got the ball first, but Donnie Avery immediately fumbled it back to the Seahawks on the opening kickoff return. He did not protect the ball when he cut into traffic.

    On their first snap from scrimmage, Richie Incognito was flagged for a five-yard false start penalty. This gave Bulger a first-and-15 situation to start with, on his own 15. The Rams gained six yards on three plays and punted.

    On the Rams’ second possession, Jackson ground out a first down. But on a second-and-nine play, Incognito took a trademark 15-yard personal foul penalty. This gave Bulger a second-and-22 situation to deal with . . . and soon the Rams punted again.

    After the Rams defense created another turnover, the offense got the ball on the Seattle 38. Avery quickly negated Jackson’s 8-yard run with a holding penalty. On third-and-7 from the 35, center Jason Brown missed Bulger with his shotgun snap. Bulger did well to recover the ball and throw an incomplete pass, but the Rams had to punt again.

    After the Rams defense created another turnover, Jacob Bell earned a false start penalty to turn a second-and-4 situation into a second-and-9 scenario.

    The Rams overcame that, but a false start penalty on Randy McMichael, followed immediately by a delay-of-game penalty, knocked them out of the red zone. Then Josh Brown missed the 37-yard field goal attempt, which should be a chip shot for him.

    On and on it went. The Rams blocked a field goal and ran it back for the game-tying TD . . . only to lose the momentum-shifting play to a video review.

    It turns out they had 12 men on the field. How do you have 12 men on the field? Doesn’t somebody count how many players go out there? Aren’t these jobs assigned?

    The Rams should have led at the half. At worst, they should have been tied with the Seahawks. Instead they trailed 14-0.


    As you can see, we had plenty of chances to get into the endzone and we didn't capitalize on any of our defenses turnovers. Almost every drive had penalties and mistakes which is ridiculous. If we didn't make some of those mistakes we could have put up at least as many points as the Seahawks did if not more by halftime. Our defense is doing their job for the most part, but our offense really needs to step it up. To tell you the truth, I think we could've won if it weren't for stupid mistakes. We are a much better team than what we saw on Sunday night. If we can work on getting the simple things fixed, then we will be a much better team. Hopefully next week we won't make drive-killing mistakes. If we don't, then the Redskins better be prepared for some good competition!

    :helmet:

  • #2
    Re: Why we didn't get to the endzone..

    Originally posted by schut39 View Post
    Here is a segment of an article by Jeff Gordon from stltoday.com that I thought was pretty interesting.

    The Rams got the ball first, but Donnie Avery immediately fumbled it back to the Seahawks on the opening kickoff return. He did not protect the ball when he cut into traffic.

    On their first snap from scrimmage, Richie Incognito was flagged for a five-yard false start penalty. This gave Bulger a first-and-15 situation to start with, on his own 15. The Rams gained six yards on three plays and punted.

    On the Rams’ second possession, Jackson ground out a first down. But on a second-and-nine play, Incognito took a trademark 15-yard personal foul penalty. This gave Bulger a second-and-22 situation to deal with . . . and soon the Rams punted again.

    After the Rams defense created another turnover, the offense got the ball on the Seattle 38. Avery quickly negated Jackson’s 8-yard run with a holding penalty. On third-and-7 from the 35, center Jason Brown missed Bulger with his shotgun snap. Bulger did well to recover the ball and throw an incomplete pass, but the Rams had to punt again.

    After the Rams defense created another turnover, Jacob Bell earned a false start penalty to turn a second-and-4 situation into a second-and-9 scenario.

    The Rams overcame that, but a false start penalty on Randy McMichael, followed immediately by a delay-of-game penalty, knocked them out of the red zone. Then Josh Brown missed the 37-yard field goal attempt, which should be a chip shot for him.

    On and on it went. The Rams blocked a field goal and ran it back for the game-tying TD . . . only to lose the momentum-shifting play to a video review.

    It turns out they had 12 men on the field. How do you have 12 men on the field? Doesn’t somebody count how many players go out there? Aren’t these jobs assigned?

    The Rams should have led at the half. At worst, they should have been tied with the Seahawks. Instead they trailed 14-0.


    As you can see, we had plenty of chances to get into the endzone and we didn't capitalize on any of our defenses turnovers. Almost every drive had penalties and mistakes which is ridiculous. If we didn't make some of those mistakes we could have put up at least as many points as the Seahawks did if not more by halftime. Our defense is doing their job for the most part, but our offense really needs to step it up. To tell you the truth, I think we could've won if it weren't for stupid mistakes. We are a much better team than what we saw on Sunday night. If we can work on getting the simple things fixed, then we will be a much better team. Hopefully next week we won't make drive-killing mistakes. If we don't, then the Redskins better be prepared for some good competition!

    :helmet:
    The problem is that it's sorta like saying, "If we weren't a bad team, we wouldn't be a bad team". If we didn't suck, we could win. I'll believe it when I see it at this point. No, instead I fear this is what's gonna happen;

    The Redskins will frustrate Cogs into 17 personal fouls. Bulger will suck again as usual. The offensive line will fall apart. Jackson will be frustrated. The defense will show flashes but fall apart as the game goes on. Then we come on this board, angry and mad as the Bulger haters anger the bulger supporters who will yet again defend him ad nasuem. Think Groundhog day, only worse.

    Or we win in a moment of jubilee. Yeah... I'm not hopeful.
    Last edited by btimsah; -09-16-2009, 02:32 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Why we didn't get to the endzone..

      Oh definitely. That's why I was so upset, because we beat ourselves, and the Seahawks get all the credit. We kept them in the game and sure as s**t, they "beat" us, it happens every time.

      It's kind of hard for Bulger to play well when he's constantly starting on a 1st and 15 rather than a 1st and 20, or a 2nd and 20 instead of a 1st down. I feel for Bulger, I really do, and I doubt Boller or Null would be any better at this point.

      This is a brand new regime too, not just on offense but on defense. As frustrating as it is, this team is rebuilding and that takes time.
      Always and Forever a fan of the St. Louis Rams

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Why we didn't get to the endzone..

        I understand all that, but eventually someone is going to have to make a play on 2nd and 15. Bulger included.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Why we didn't get to the endzone..

          Originally posted by txramsfan View Post
          I understand all that, but eventually someone is going to have to make a play on 2nd and 15. Bulger included.
          Yeah, down the road when the offense is more in-sync, that's to be expected with playmakers like Jackson in the backfield. As of right now, this offense cannot afford to have stupid penalties. It's still a work in progress and those penalties are just detrimental to getting those 6 points as opposed to getting 3 points or punting...We can't expect so much from such a young team, unfortunately.
          Always and Forever a fan of the St. Louis Rams

          Comment

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          • RamFan_Til_I_Die
            Sloppiness is still the Rams' trademark
            by RamFan_Til_I_Die
            Sloppiness is still the Rams' trademark

            By Jeff Gordon
            STLTODAY.COM SPORTS COLUMNIST
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            Sloppiness crept into Rams Park during the Mike Martz Era, during those exciting “Shoot, we’ll fix it” days.

            Those teams routinely wasted timeouts, drew untimely penalties and coughed up the football. Those teams had the firepower to score more points than they gave away, so life was still pretty good.

            But when the Rams lost some of that firepower, things turned ugly fast. Martz’s latter-day Rams were an undisciplined mess.

            His successor, Scott Linehan, never got things under control. Hiring him as head coach of the Rams was like sending a 12-year-old crossing guard to work Times Square. It was a total mismatch.

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            Colorful interim coach Jim Haslett got the team’s attention for a couple of weeks last season, before the team reverted to its unruly ways.

            Despite Steve Spagnuolo’s best efforts, we just saw more of the same in Week 1 of this season.

            The Rams have a new team president, a newly empowered general manager, a new coach and a mostly new coaching staff. Nearly half of the players are new this season, too.

            Yet the sloppiness remains in this organization, like a pesky virus or a mutant strain of cockroaches immune to bug spray. The Rams blundered their way to a 28-0 loss Sunday, continuing their futility against the NFC West in general and the Seahawks in particular.

            Sure, the Rams played with passion. Steven Jackson was as demonstrative as we’ve seen him and even Marc Bulger was feisty.

            Of course, when the other team pounds your face into the turf you ought to get mad. Rookie Seahawks linebacker Aaron Curry crushed Jackson and the Seattle defense did a tag-team number on Bulger, giving him another thorough physical beating.

            Jackson and Bulger pushed back, which is good for them.

            As for the overall game, though, it offered just more of the same:

            The Rams got the ball first, but Donnie Avery immediately fumbled it back to the Seahawks on the opening kickoff return. He did not protect the ball when he cut into traffic.

            On their first snap from scrimmage, Richie Incognito was flagged for a five-yard false start penalty. This gave Bulger a first-and-15 situation to start with, on his own 15. The Rams gained six yards on three plays and punted.

            On the Rams’ second possession, Jackson ground out a first down. But on a second-and-nine play, Incognito took a trademark 15-yard personal foul penalty. This gave Bulger a second-and-22 situation to deal with . . . and soon the Rams punted...
            -09-15-2009, 02:23 PM
          • MFranke
            RamView, 9/13/2009: Seahawks 28, Rams 0 (Long)
            by MFranke
            RamView, September 13, 2009
            From The Couch
            (Report and opinions on the game.)
            Game #1: Seahawks 28, Rams 0

            Despite sea change at Rams Park since the end of last season, where the Rams and Seattle Seahawks are concerned, things just stay the same. The Rams failed to cash in big opportunities early in the game, and for the rest of the game, they just failed. ELEVEN straight regular-season losses, ELEVEN straight losses in the division, NINE straight losses to Seattle... Somebody change the station, I am sick of this song.

            * QB: The St. Louis Post-Dispatch handed out exactly one F on their report card for this game, and it went to Marc Bulger (17-36-191). Really? As ugly as the offense looked, didn't Bulger do his job? He had two poor plays that were nearly interceptions, but those were his only bad throws. He threw two pretty bombs to Laurent Robinson, who whiffed on one he should have caught in the 3rd before grabbing one for 46 late in the game. A complaint is that Bulger “didn't make a lot happen even when he had time to throw”. And a common play today was: Bulger gets plenty of time to throw, rolls out, throws the ball away. So receivers were popping open in the Seahawk secondary all day and Bulger was missing them? Funny, nobody points that out. Until somebody does, all one's doing in criticizing Bulger is criticizing him for playing possession football, which is what he's supposed to be doing. Am I wrong? Here's the Post-Dispatch, though: “When a team gets shut out, most of the blame falls on the QB.” Maybe the Rams' poor 3rd-down conversion rate, 2 for 12, is supposed to be Bulger's fault, though most of those 3rd downs were exacerbated by line penalties, and again, lack of open receivers. Poor shotgun snaps, dropped passes, flinchy linemen, $14 million kickers choking on medium-length field goals, special teams gaffes, absence of run blocking, blitzers coming up the middle untouched or running over $45 million running backs, global warming, dogs and cats living together, turnovers, all Bulger's fault today, I guess. Oh, that's right, Bulger didn't commit any turnovers. No doubt, more (= any) mobility could help Bulger and the Rams out. On some of the plays where Bulger took one of his three sacks or made one of his umpteen throwaways, maybe Kyle Boller pulls the ball down and gets upfield with some kind of gain. Some argument - the Rams got shut out because the QB didn't scramble enough. I know there's a cottage industry in making excuses for Marc Bulger's play the last couple of seasons, but dammit, scapegoating the guy for today's loss is just as questionable. Vintage Marc Bulger couldn’t have gotten anything done today, either. A lot on offense needs to get fixed before current Bulger can be blamed for its problems.

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            -09-14-2009, 01:55 PM
          • Guest's Avatar
            The Way I See It.
            by Guest
            The Rams defense was able to force 3 early turnovers and rattle Seattle QB Matt Hasselback. However, Hasselback being the NFL star that he is, shook those int's off and turned in a good performance.

            Marc Bulger on the other hand did his usual - nothing. He did not throw any picks, but of course, threw no touchdowns. As a result, the offense could not get the running game going. The offensive line did struggle with pressure, but Hasselback under similar heat somehow managed to score 3 touchdowns.
            • Bulger was 16-34 for 184 yards and of course no scores. He never scores.
            • Hasselback on the hand, shakes off 2 int's to go 25 of 36 for 279 yards and 3 touchdowns.

            Had the Rams been able to muster anything through the air, the running game would have opened up and eventually touchdowns would have ensued.

            Until the get the passing game going, it's going to be a long season. I'm not sure Bulger has it anymore. We are down to another offensive system and year. Don't forget Bulger's coordinator-killer list;

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            Pat Shurmur next?
            -09-13-2009, 05:21 PM
          • RamFan_Til_I_Die
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            Futility flashback
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            SEATTLE — The foundation for Rams football under rookie head coach Steve Spagnuolo is supposed to be built on intensity, focus and attention to detail. Suffice it to say, the foundation still contains plenty of cracks, and it's going to take more than a little spackle to seal them.

            Oh, the intensity was there in Sunday's 28-0 drubbing by the Seahawks at Qwest Field. Trouble was, it frequently got out of control. (See: Richie Incognito.)

            But the focus and attention to detail? Apparently, those two qualities didn't make the trip to the Pacific Northwest.

            Granted, for 1½ quarters, the Rams showed the kind of resiliency necessary to dig out of the franchise's recent doldrums. But one mistake after another eventually took its toll. When a blocked field goal for a touchdown by St. Louis was reversed by a penalty for too many men on the field the floodgates opened.

            Seattle broke open what had been a 7-0 game before the blocked field goal play, scoring on three of its next four possessions. By game's end it looked like just another rout — complete with 10 penalties against St. Louis, 446 yards offense by Seattle and next to no production by the Rams' inept offense on third down and in the red zone.

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            Similarly, he fell on the sword when it came to the blocked field goal, a play in which the Rams added new meaning to the mystique of Seattle's 12th Man. (When he wasn't in the stands cheering on the Seahawks, the 12th Man apparently was lining up with the Rams' field goal block unit.)

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            -09-14-2009, 09:25 AM
          • RamWraith
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            By Howard Balzer
            Monday, September 22, 2008

            When a team has been outscored 116-29 in three games, including 38-0 in the first quarter, and been outgained 1,370-607, everyone has an opinion of what's wrong.

            The simple truth regarding this version of the St. Louis Rams is that virtually everything is wrong. It's difficult to find much that is right.

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            Quarterback Marc Bulger: "There can be a lot of speculation that we’re not ready to play when we first come out. We just get our butts kicked at first. Teams have been playing better than us in the first quarter, but I don’t think it's lack of effort. I think it’s just execution because guys are pretty excited, all three games. We come out, I wouldn’t say flat, just not playing good football."

            Defensive tackle La'Roi Glover: "Our confidence is a little down."

            Linebacker Pisa Tinoisamoa: "It’s tough to know exactly what the problems are. Clearly, there is an attitude thing going on. There is an attitude adjustment that is needed. You guys up in the press box can probably feel it too. Some might call it confidence; I call it attitude. I think the attitude has to be there and right now it isn’t.”

            Running back Steven Jackson: "We’re at the point now where we don’t know where to go or where to look to for direction."

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            However, this team needed the defense to help keep it in games, and on that account, they have failed miserably.

            Big plays against the defense have been epidemic in the first three games. Against Philadelphia, it was the pass defense that allowed 245 yards on five plays. In the first half of that game, Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb passed for 297 yards and 220 came on four plays.

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            Said a shell-shocked coach Scott Linehan, "We haven’t been able to stop the run or the big plays in the running game, which seems to...
            -09-22-2008, 03:24 PM
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