Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Star Running Back Relishes Role with Rebuilding Rams

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Star Running Back Relishes Role with Rebuilding Rams

    NFL.com

    Steve Wyche

    As the losses have piled up around the NFL, so has the zaniness.

    Winless Tampa Bay is on its third quarterback. Kansas City running back Larry Johnson blasted his coach on Twitter, then zipped the same gay slur on back-to-back days for public consumption, leading to a suspension. Washington took everything but his title from coach Jim Zorn (pride included). Tennessee underwent an owner-ordered quarterback change.

    In Cleveland, owner Randy Lerner promised changes and started by bouncing the general manager this week. Fans met with the owner about their dissatisfaction with the team. The starting tailback said he'd rather retire after the season than come back to this, with this being a team that is the current leader in NFL dysfunction.

    In St. Louis, though, there hasn't been a peep. The Rams got their first win last week over, a 17-10 decision over Detroit after starting 0-7, but there hasn't been any uproar, firings, player outbursts or tales of coaching tyranny. It's not because of apathy or because they play in a small market, or anything like that.


    Tom Gannam / Associated Press
    First-year coach Steve Spagnuolo hasn't let the Rams get frustrated over a 1-7 start.
    Things are moving along under the radar because first-time coach Steve Spagnuolo has been totally up front with his players and coaches about his plan and he's stuck to it with the backing of management and everyone else he's come into contact with. His forthrightness has allowed players on a roster with junior-varsity talent to compete without complaint.

    "All the way back in OTAs, coaches asked us to buy into the vision and that's building a high-character team," running back Steven Jackson said. "It's all about team. You put yourself behind the team. We're going through a transition of who fits the scheme, who are the guys the coaches feel they can build a solid foundation with.

    "What we have here is a strong leader as a head coach. Him and our GM (Billy Devaney) have a vision and there's no grey areas. They tell you this is where we're headed. Even if you dislike it, there's no question he knows what he's doing. That makes the road easier."

    That Jackson, 26, has bought in so thoroughly is huge, and is refreshing in this era of guys begging out of bad situations to coattail onto a better situation.

    I asked Jackson (who is second in rushing in the NFL, if you haven't noticed) if he felt he was wasting his prime years toiling for a franchise that has been among the worst in the league the past few years.

    "Not at all," he said. "I want to feel the momentum and enjoy it when we turn this thing around. I want to be able to look that guy in the eye and know we share common tears of joy or whatever that moment brings. I want to know me and this person have worked through this together. I don't want to go to another organization where I don't know anyone or hold the Lombardi Trophy where I didn't really build things. I don't think it would mean as much after I've put in so much work here."

    You can be as cynical as you want about his feelings on toiling through the futility, but his effort and production on the field seem to back up what he's saying. It's hard to be cynical about that.

    One more thing on the Rams
    There has been speculation as to whether this will be quarterback Marc Bulger's last year with the team, especially with him being owed $8.5 million next season. I've been told that Rams management hasn't begun that evaluation process yet.

    However, Bulger's retention could very well rest on the fact that St. Louis has so many other needs to fill that it could try to address those concerns before getting to the quarterback situation. Then again, if St. Louis feels the right quarterback is available, they could address those other needs after it replaces Bulger.

    -----

    I made Jackson's quote bold because it NEEDS to be read.

    What he said is amazing. It makes all the sense in the world. I know a bunch of us (including myself) wondered if his talent was being wasted here but now I see... Jackson, along with the other players believe in what they are doing. They believe things are going to change and that's something I would want to be apart of when it all comes together, wouldn't you?
    Always and Forever a fan of the St. Louis Rams

  • #2
    Re: Star Running Back Relishes Role with Rebuilding Rams

    In this era of me first mentality, it is so great to see Steven Jackson standing up and leading the team and not being selfish. This guy is simply a pleasure to have on this team.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Star Running Back Relishes Role with Rebuilding Rams

      Steven Jackson has said a lot of things in his time with the Rams, not all of which I've agreed with.

      "Not at all," he said. "I want to feel the momentum and enjoy it when we turn this thing around. I want to be able to look that guy in the eye and know we share common tears of joy or whatever that moment brings. I want to know me and this person have worked through this together. I don't want to go to another organization where I don't know anyone or hold the Lombardi Trophy where I didn't really build things. I don't think it would mean as much after I've put in so much work here."


      This however, along with what I saw him do to Detroit, is quite possibly one of the most inspiring things for a fan of the Rams to hear and see for the last 3-4 seasons and possibly longer than that.

      Leadership.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Star Running Back Relishes Role with Rebuilding Rams

        Too bad there's no option to rep Jackson for that comment.

        You don't hear guys saying that kind of thing enough, and it's even nicer to hear it from a guy who has taken his share of criticism over the years in St. Louis.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Star Running Back Relishes Role with Rebuilding Rams

          Reading this has given me the exact type of feeling that has been missing. I have NEVER lost faith in being a Rams fan, but I have to admit that it has definitely been a roller coaster of emotion. I am a true believer in this team and I am also a true believer that Jackson is EXACTLY the type of guy to build around. I will always be a Rams fan no matter what the organization does, but I sure hope they feed off from Jackson's energy RATHER than his value on the market.
          Steve

          What you see is what you get, but what you see depends on where you stand.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Star Running Back Relishes Role with Rebuilding Rams

            That comment should be on the top of the main page. Maybe if we saw it enough, all of us fans would want to be part of that rebuilding process too. I thought about putting it in my sig, but I don't post enough, and Varg6 found it, so he has rights to it first...
            This space for rent...

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Star Running Back Relishes Role with Rebuilding Rams

              Steven J is a throwback dude. Love that guy

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Star Running Back Relishes Role with Rebuilding Rams

                Originally posted by thoey View Post
                That comment should be on the top of the main page. Maybe if we saw it enough, all of us fans would want to be part of that rebuilding process too. I thought about putting it in my sig, but I don't post enough, and Varg6 found it, so he has rights to it first...
                That's a great idea man, I might have to do that!
                Always and Forever a fan of the St. Louis Rams

                Comment

                Related Topics

                Collapse

                • eldfan
                  Star running back relishing role with rebuilding Rams
                  by eldfan
                  Star running back relishing role with rebuilding Rams
                  By Steve Wyche | NFL.com
                  Senior Writer






                  As the losses have piled up around the NFL, so has the zaniness.

                  Winless Tampa Bay is on its third quarterback. Kansas City running back Larry Johnson blasted his coach on Twitter, then zipped the same gay slur on back-to-back days for public consumption, leading to a suspension. Washington took everything but his title from coach Jim Zorn (pride included). Tennessee underwent an owner-ordered quarterback change.

                  In Cleveland, owner Randy Lerner promised changes and started by bouncing the general manager this week. Fans met with the owner about their dissatisfaction with the team. The starting tailback said he'd rather retire after the season than come back to this, with this being a team that is the current leader in NFL dysfunction.

                  In St. Louis, though, there hasn't been a peep. The Rams got their first win last week over, a 17-10 decision over Detroit after starting 0-7, but there hasn't been any uproar, firings, player outbursts or tales of coaching tyranny. It's not because of apathy or because they play in a small market, or anything like that.



                  Things are moving along under the radar because first-time coach Steve Spagnuolo has been totally up front with his players and coaches about his plan and he's stuck to it with the backing of management and everyone else he's come into contact with. His forthrightness has allowed players on a roster with junior-varsity talent to compete without complaint.

                  "All the way back in OTAs, coaches asked us to buy into the vision and that's building a high-character team," running back Steven Jackson said. "It's all about team. You put yourself behind the team. We're going through a transition of who fits the scheme, who are the guys the coaches feel they can build a solid foundation with.

                  "What we have here is a strong leader as a head coach. Him and our GM (Billy Devaney) have a vision and there's no grey areas. They tell you this is where we're headed. Even if you dislike it, there's no question he knows what he's doing. That makes the road easier."

                  That Jackson, 26, has bought in so thoroughly is huge, and is refreshing in this era of guys begging out of bad situations to coattail onto a better situation.

                  I asked Jackson (who is second in rushing in the NFL, if you haven't noticed) if he felt he was wasting his prime years toiling for a franchise that has been among the worst in the league the past few years.

                  "Not at all," he said. "I want to feel the momentum and enjoy it when we turn this thing around. I want to be able to look that guy in the eye and know we share common tears of joy or whatever that moment brings. I want to know me and this person...
                  -11-05-2009, 07:39 PM
                • r8rh8rmike
                  Jackson Not Clamoring To Escape Losing Rams
                  by r8rh8rmike
                  Jackson not clamoring to escape losing Rams

                  By Michael Silver, Yahoo! Sports
                  4 hours, 44 minutes ago


                  He plays on a blatantly rebuilding team which has lost 15 consecutive games, and he’s a 26-year-old running back on pace for a 1,443-yard season.

                  Steven Jackson can do the grisly math, and that’s why he wasn’t especially caught off guard Thursday night when I asked him if he thought the St. Louis Rams might deal him to another team before Tuesday’s NFL trading deadline – which, incidentally, is the one-year anniversary of their last victory.

                  ”It really wouldn’t surprise me,” Jackson said. ”A couple of years ago I saw Isaac Bruce(notes) get let go and end up on the *****, and I realized anything is possible in this business. So I just put my head down and play hard and try to win games for the St. Louis Rams – and I want to be a St. Louis Ram for as long as they’ll have me.

                  ”At the same time, I’m very aware of the business side of this game. Last year, I went through a holdout, so I learned all about the business side first-hand. If I get that phone call that I’ve been shipped out, I’ll roll with it. But I’ve laid a lot of groundwork here and I think we’re turning it around, and I’d like to reap the benefits when we do.”

                  In previous years, the notion of a team dumping a high-priced, consistently productive star like Jackson in October would have been almost inconceivable. I still think such a move would be a longshot, but it’s at least in the realm of possibility, because NFL teams are more receptive to in-season wheeling and dealing than they’ve been in the past.

                  Chalk it up to a combination of desperation (teams like the Washington Redskins, Dallas Cowboys, Minnesota Vikings, Houston Texans, Chicago Bears, Carolina Panthers, New York Jets and San Diego Chargers are either in win-now mode or run by general managers and/or coaches desperate to save their jobs), opportunity (there’s an inordinate number of truly awful teams with no realistic hope of contending this year) and economics (with an uncapped year looming, and a potential lockout after that, teams can take more chances than usual in terms of salary structure). Oh, and the 2010 NFL draft crop is being billed as a strong one, which makes those picks more valuable.

                  Even general managers skeptical of parting with those precious picks had to have their appetites whetted by last week’s trade between the Cleveland Browns and Jets that brought talented, 26-year-old wideout Braylon Edwards(notes) to the Big Apple. After more than a year’s worth of substandard performances, Edwards delivered in his first game with the Jets (who sent two players and a pair of draft picks, reportedly in the third and fifth rounds, to Cleveland). He caught five passes for 64 yards and a touchdown and made plays which set up two more scores in a Monday night defeat to the Miami...
                  -10-16-2009, 01:51 PM
                • RamWraith
                  Jackson need not apologize for speaking out truthfully
                  by RamWraith
                  By Bryan Burwell
                  ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
                  Friday, Sep. 21 2007

                  Leadership comes in many forms. It can be as subtle as a look, as complicated
                  as a plan, as forceful as a sermon or as compelling as the cult of personality.

                  In the simulated battlefield environment of pro football, leadership is most
                  often identified in emotional men who rage wonderfully in the heat of battle.
                  There is no place on the football field for anyone who cringes or panics in
                  their athletic wars. So it strikes me a little odd that anyone would demand or
                  quietly coax an apology from Rams running back Steven Jackson for baring his
                  dissatisfaction with another fourth-quarter meltdown by his team in last
                  Sunday's 17-16 loss to the San Francisco *****.

                  I would never undercut the passion that Jackson shows on the field. I would
                  never suggest for a second that he turn down his competitive fire even one
                  notch. I would never discourage the intensity he carries in his gut and the
                  will to win that he displays every time he steps on the field. In fact, I would
                  stoke it so all his positive emotion spreads to some of his underachieving and
                  nonchalant teammates.

                  A year ago, quarterback Marc Bulger ripped into unnamed underachieving
                  teammates, and he was hailed as a team leader. He exposed some unvarnished,
                  inconvenient truths about the passion and commitment of some of his teammates,
                  and Bulger was not convinced to tone down, smooth over or distill his outrage.

                  There was no polite backtracking, and there never should have been. It was the
                  last thing that struggling team needed at the time, and it's the last thing the
                  Rams need now as they try to break out of this mistake-filled 0-2 start to the
                  2007 regular season. Nearly 10 months ago, Bulger was trying to rattle a few
                  cages and deliver a message that there were more than a few young, gifted and
                  underachieving athletes on this squad who must learn, as Bulger put it, the
                  difference between being a professional and being on scholarship.

                  And here we are with another Rams team struggling to get its act together and
                  another team leader expressing his outrage over the way things are going.
                  That's what leaders are supposed to do, and he has no reason to apologize.

                  Instead of questioning him, the folks at Rams Park ought to listen carefully to
                  Jackson, mimick his desire and share his hatred of losing these close and
                  winnable ball games.

                  It has been a long time since the Rams have had such an athlete like Jackson, a
                  rising star who wants to race full speed into the burning spotlight and take on
                  all the joys and burdens of stardom: high performance, visibility, high
                  character, role model and team leader.

                  I don't...
                  -09-21-2007, 05:41 AM
                • MauiRam
                  Jackson Carries Rams Into the Light ..
                  by MauiRam
                  By Nick Wagoner/Senior Writer
                  Posted 2 hours ago

                  It is said that out of darkness will emerge light. How quickly that light emerges depends on whether you move with confidence or tiptoe through the shadows.

                  Steven Jackson has never tiptoed through anything in his life. And though it’s taken longer than he would have liked, the eighth-year running back is on the verge of delivering the Rams out of the darkness and into the light.

                  It’s a task that many would choose not to take on for enduring the pain that goes with it would be too much for just about anyone to bear.

                  Jackson has been called many things in his career but there’s one common nickname he’s been called that he never quite grasped until he took the time during the offseason to wrap his head around it.

                  “It’s funny I have been referred to as a beast for quite some time and I said, ‘You know, I am going to look it up. What does the word beast mean?’” Jackson said. “And to give you a quick synopsis of how I look at it and how I thought of it is ‘a mammal that bears the weight of something and transports it.’ I feel like I have been a beast because I bear the weight of some tough times around St. Louis and I have carried it from the days of glory to now hopefully to a new age and a new version of the days of glory. And I have been the particular, chosen one to feel like maybe he’s the one strong enough to bring us through the darkness back to a point where (quarterback) Sam (Bradford) and these younger guys will bring us back to glory.”

                  Bearing the weight of an entire franchise’s struggle is a burden Jackson has carried for all of his seven seasons in the NFL. On closer inspection, it’s clear that Jackson’s sacrifice has gone well beyond simply being a part of a losing team.

                  In fact, he’s one of the last of his kind in the NFL, a running back willing and capable of taking on a full load in a league that grown more specialized by the season.

                  The job of the single running back carrying the load is one thing; the job of the single player carrying the hopes of a franchise on his back is another. Jackson has done both.

                  It’s a job Jackson believes he was chosen for, a job he was selected for by powers greater than a general manager or head coach.

                  “I think it’s a divine job not for the organization but for me, myself because I never knew some of the strong characteristics and the things that I believe in were within me until I had to go through some tough times,” Jackson said.

                  A DYING BREED

                  With each passing NFL season, the league evolves and changes in ways that consistently alter the way players and positions are perceived.

                  Today, in 2011, the NFL is almost universally viewed as a quarterback’s league, a passing league in which running backs can be found and deployed in a variety of ways and you can...
                  -09-07-2011, 11:01 AM
                • r8rh8rmike
                  Learning To Lead: The Evolution Of Steven Jackson
                  by r8rh8rmike
                  Learning to Lead: The Evolution of Steven Jackson
                  Wednesday, October 7, 2009


                  By Nick Wagoner
                  Senior Writer

                  “Our response to an offense determines our future.” – Author John Bevere, “The Bait of Satan.”

                  Right there in black and white for his eyes to see, Steven Jackson constantly goes back to this book. It’s one of his favorites though if you ask him to name them it might take a while because he’s constantly diving into a new one.

                  On the surface, passages like the one above might seem simple. Then again, on the surface, a person might be viewed the same way.

                  What you don’t know is how complicated something or someone can be when you dig a littler deeper. In the case of Steven Jackson, a little closer look can reveal something you never would have guessed or even attempted to try.

                  A BORN LEADER

                  At the conclusion of nearly every Rams practice, a few players always lag behind the group on the long walk back to the locker room. Some stay behind and catch passes, others work on footwork. They all do it by choice but some undoubtedly do it because that’s what Jackson does.

                  Jackson is the one who will quickly peel off his pads and run extra gassers, not because he’s out of shape but because it sets the right example of what it takes to be successful.

                  The Rams have the fourth-youngest team in the NFL with an average age of right around 26. Coincidentally, Jackson is the same age. But because he entered the league when he was only 20, Jackson’s ascent to a leadership role has happened quicker than most.

                  As he’s grown and developed as a player, he’s seen players come and go and just now, in 2009, has he taken it upon himself to become the leader of this young group.

                  “I have seen nothing but great things,” coach Steve Spagnuolo said. “His greatness in that regard, in the leadership regard is shining right now when it’s not the best of times and the results haven’t been what we want. I’m not going to share with you one other thing but there was something he did that meant the world to me and I appreciated him and how he’s gone about things right now.”

                  Growing up in Las Vegas, Jackson’s lessons in leadership began at an early age. His father, Steve, practically majored in the subject as a Marine veteran in the Vietnam War.

                  That meant plenty of “yes, sir” and “no, sir” in the Jackson household but it also began a cultivation process in the planting of those seeds of leadership.

                  Jackson learned a lot of the details from his father, things like always being on time, keeping your word and being dressed presentably for every occasion. Those little things that can determine one’s character.

                  “You have to go through a maturation of becoming a leader,” Jackson said. “Everyone doesn’t have leadership qualities but those...
                  -10-08-2009, 10:20 AM
                Working...
                X