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  • Rams report /notes, quotes

    From USA TODAY


    The injury bug has also spread to the team's coaches.
    Defensive coordinator Ken Flajole, who was walking gingerly when he spoke to the media, injured his groin in a drill.
    He said, "I was trying to be a young guy and help on the pass drill and I realized I'm an old guy. I pulled my groin. I was like a linebacker and I was trying to show the safety where the 'backer would be. Let me tell you, my youthful indiscretion got the best of me. I realized I've got to be in better shape.
    "James Laurinaitis has got nothing to worry about."


    —The Rams won't be changing their schemes during their bye week. They won't be making any drastic changes.
    What they will be doing is examining closely what they are at this point. Many teams around the NFL are trying to figure that out right now, while establishing a personality.
    Aside from playing bad football during the first four games of the season, this Rams team doesn't have an identity.
    From an explosive beginning when running back Steven Jackson scored on a 47-yard run on the first offensive play of the season, the offense has quickly degenerated into a dysfunctional mess that was fueled by the injury Jackson sustained on that run and the loss of wide receiver Danny Amendola, quarterback Sam Bradford's security blanket, also in that first game.
    The coaching staff wasted no time Monday beginning the self-scouting process that could also include some soul-searching. Players practiced Tuesday and Wednesday, but most of the coach's time will be spent being realistic assessing the talent on hand and figuring out the best way of utilizing it when the season resumes with an Oct. 16 game in Green Bay.
    As coach Steve Spagnuolo said, "You never know when you get the schedule at the beginning of the year if the bye week comes at a good time. In this particular case I think it does."
    It wasn't difficult for Spagnuolo to list what will be scrutinized closely.
    "Certainly protections, certainly third down on both sides, certainly the run fronts on offense. These are the things that just stick out," he said. "You guys can probably list another five or six of them, but we'll look at them all. And the thing you do have to be careful with, with that, and I've learned this over the years, is you can't go searching for things that are not there.
    "And you can't knee-jerk react to things that you find, because in a lot of instances, it just comes back to fundamentals. I know that's not the glorious answer that you want, but a lot of times that's what it comes down to."
    Fundamentals like catching the ball, blocking somebody, lining up correctly or not starting too soon have been lacking. Games can change when a team is simply opportunistic and fundamentally sound.
    "I think some of that is, we're living through some growing pains there," he said. "We've got guys out there for the first time in NFL games. I know it's the fourth game and I'm not trying to make excuses, but if you don't catch the football ... both sides of the ball; if you don't catch the football, come up with it when it's on the ground, it makes it hard to win. It changes everything when you get the turnovers on defense and when you catch those particular balls on offense. The whole thing changes."
    When asked about changing schemes (something that would be unrealistic anyway during a season), Spagnuolo said, "Both schemes offensively and defensively, all three (including special teams), have been proven in this league at various places. We believe in that. I know the players believe.
    "What I do think we need to do is do it better. I believe that. That's as simple as I can state it and I believe in that. Will we find a couple of wrinkles? Yeah. You do that all the time. If we were 4-0 we'd find a couple of scheme wrinkles, but at the core we're not going to abandon what we do, we're just going to do it better."
    One wrinkle could be rolling Bradford out more.
    "We could do that," Spagnuolo said. "We talked a little bit more about more three-step. Where it gets to be a problem and we made this statement this morning when we talked, the shorter passes would be fine. What we've got to do is stay out of the third-and-really-longs because then it becomes a little bit tougher. I'm with you on the movement passes which we did have in there, we'll probably find ways to get more of them in there. Sam does throw the ball well on the run."

    NOTES, QUOTES
    Undrafted free agent James Dockery, who agreed to terms with the Rams only to renege and sign with the Cleveland Browns. Dockery is on the Browns' 53-man roster.
    —There is also some injury concern with tight end Michael Hoomanawanui, who was officially diagnosed with a concussion. He missed significant time in training camp because of a concussion.
    Said Spagnuolo, "Today (Monday) he seemed to be coming around a little bit, so we'll see where he is tomorrow. But now we go through that same process that we do with all the concussions. Hopefully this one's not as bad as the last one, for lack of a better way to say it, and hopefully he can bounce back and he is OK. But they are concerning."
    —Sometimes league rankings can be misleading, especially after only four games.
    But, in the case of the Rams' offense, there are some sobering realities.
    The Rams are one of only five teams with fewer than 10 red-zone trips this season. They have nine, and are tied for the third-worst percentage of touchdowns at 33.3 percent.
    Their poor production on first down Sunday pushed the Rams to last in the NFL with an average of 4.18 yards on first down. By way of contrast New England is first at 7.52.
    The Rams are next-to-last converting 27.9 percent of their third-down plays. San Diego is first at 58.5.
    Last season, the Rams' defense was one of the better units in the league allowing just a 33.5 percent conversion rate on third down. After four games, that figure has jumped to 45.9, which ranks 30th in the NFL.
    In some other telling categories, the Rams' offense is last in yards per play, last in net passing yards per play and next to last in sacks per pass play.
    BY THE NUMBERS: 1-7 — The Rams' record, dating back to last season, after they were 6-6 with four games to play.


    QUOTE TO NOTE: "Just keep chopping wood. That's really all you can do. We realize that it's not going to get any easier for us. Nobody feels sorry for us. We don't feel sorry for ourselves. Hopefully guys rest up this week after we have a couple practices and just come back with a passion and determination to try to do something about it." — LB James Laurinaitis, when asked what the team can do going forward.
    :ramlogo:

  • #2
    Re: Rams report /notes, quotes

    At least it looks like they are going to mix in more short quick passes and roll outs. We need to keep Sam upright and alive!

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Rams report /notes, quotes

      That needs to be the PARAMOUNT PRIORITY moving forward!!!! To hell with all other issues, they just need to learn how to damn block and keep Sam on his feet.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Rams report /notes, quotes

        So in other words, we'll resort more to last year's offensive scheme when it comes to the passing game? Wow, I'm really looking forward to that.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Rams report /notes, quotes

          I thought Mcdaniels scheme is a five step drop as opposed to last years 3 step which Shurmur utilized and helped Bradford's completion percentage what it was last year. This years offensive line doesn't seem to have the ability to hold and contain the defense whether it is from the right, left or up the middle. Not so sure we will come close to what we achieved last year in the short /middle passing game. I have to agree with you that the roll outs seem to be a good option. In the end we have to have receivers who have got to CATCH THE DAMN BALL!!!:mad:
          Last edited by rayzorram; -10-08-2011, 12:52 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Rams report /notes, quotes

            If we can't pass block, and we can't catch passes, and our recieving corps is so poor, and our passing game is last in the league, then RUN THE DAMN BALL.

            Every down. Every time. Let the recievers line up as blockers; let em know it's coming. Smash em. Go option.

            Do something completely different.

            Do something.
            Look away. I'm hideous. __ Cozmo Kramer

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Rams report /notes, quotes

              Sorry, double post post.
              Last edited by live4ramin; -10-09-2011, 12:21 PM.
              Look away. I'm hideous. __ Cozmo Kramer

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Rams report /notes, quotes

                More.....

                Always go for it on fourth down. Always.

                Alwasy go for two. Keep running.

                Onside kick; no always, but much more often.

                Show confidance in the team.

                Try to win.

                Be desparate.

                Be Bold.
                Look away. I'm hideous. __ Cozmo Kramer

                Comment

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                  The Rams won't be changing their schemes during their bye week. They won't be making any drastic changes.
                  What they will be doing is examining closely what they are at this point. Many teams around the NFL are trying to figure that out right now, while establishing a personality.
                  Aside from playing bad football, this Rams team doesn't have an identity.

                  From an explosive beginning when running back Steven Jackson scored on a 47-yard run on the first offensive play of the season, the offense has quickly degenerated into a dysfunctional mess that has was fueled by the injury Jackson suffered on that run and the loss of wide receiver Danny Amendola, quarterback Sam Bradford's security blanket, also in that first game.

                  The coaching staff wasted no time Monday beginning the self-scouting process that could also include some soul-searching. Players will practice Tuesday and Wednesday, but most of the coach's time will be spent being realistic assessing the talent on hand and figuring out the best way of utilizing it when the season resumes with an Oct. 16 game in Green Bay.

                  As coach Steve Spagnuolo said Monday, "You never know when you get the schedule at the beginning of the year if the bye week comes at a good time. In this particular case I think it does."
                  It wasn't difficult for Spagnuolo to list what will be scrutinized closely.

                  "Certainly protections, certainly third down on both sides, certainly the run fronts on offense. These are the things that just stick out. You guys can probably list another five or six of them, but we'll look at them all. And the thing you do have to be careful with, with that, and I've learned this over the years, is you can't go searching for things that are not there.
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                  Games can change when a team is simply opportunistic and fundamentally sound.
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                  He admitted, "I have had my moments (of frustration). But I think there's a professional way to do it. I think everybody in this business should be respected for the jobs they have. I think any business is about respecting each other. I don't see any reason to go off the cuff. I keep that to myself. Part of what we talk about as a team is being a poised team. You can't be a poised team if the head coach isn't poised."

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                  -11-11-2009, 04:42 PM
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                  -11-05-2009, 10:38 PM
                • r8rh8rmike
                  Rams Focus On Staying United
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                  By Nick Wagoner
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                  As the clock wound down on the Rams’ loss to San Francisco on Sunday, running back Steven Jackson made it a point to provide some obvious leadership to his young teammates.

                  No, Jackson didn’t return to the sideline yelling and screaming. He didn’t get a silly penalty to try to prove some sort of toughness, either.

                  Instead, Jackson did what he always does. When the ball was handed to him, he ran as hard as he could. Regardless of the score, Jackson kept grinding away against a San Francisco defense that had fully committed to trying to slow him down.

                  In the process, Jackson knowingly sent a message to his teammates that quitting is never an option.

                  “That last drive I was able to be in, I just tried to run with a different determination, not to say that I was holding anything back, but you have got to understand that when you are down like we were you don’t give up,” Jackson said. “We are professional football players and we are expected to execute. We are going to lose battles out there but within those battles you cannot lose yourself in the game. We have to continue to fight no matter what the scoreboard says.”

                  Now four games in to the 2009 season, the Rams have reached the quarter pole of the first season under coach Steve Spagnuolo.

                  While that opening stretch hasn’t resulted yet in a victory, Spagnuolo and locker room leaders such as Jackson are doing everything they can to keep the ship headed in the right direction.

                  For the league’s fourth-youngest team (average age of right around 26), the rebuilding process can be slow and painful. And when dealing with youth and inexperience, it’s imperative for the people who have been around – the veterans and the coaching staff – to keep hammering away at the details until they become second nature.

                  It’s a painstaking process but it must be done. And though Spagnuolo can’t send any messages with his play on the field, it is his job to continue to take the temperature of his team and find ways to keep everyone’s head focused on moving on to the next step and not allowing any losses to fester.

                  “I believe in this group,” Spagnuolo said. We can get out of this and work our way out of this. It’s going to take a lot of work. Nothing I am going to say is going to be different than what I have been saying all year long. Those games are done, we move on to Minnesota. We try to learn from it and we try to get better as a football team.”

                  Indeed, Spagnuolo has been true to his message from day one, never altering the tone or even the volume of what he wants to convey to his team even in the face of adversity.

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                  -10-05-2009, 08:32 PM
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