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  • Several Splashes, Few Ripples...

    The metaphor that makes up this thread title expresses what I really like about the Rams' FA approach.

    Any team (subject to the ability to clear cap space), can try to make a big splash in FA by offering a lucrative contract to a well-know, big-name FA. While fans and the media will often praise moves of that type, there are countless examples of FAs who didn't pan out, or who ultimately because high-priced anchors on their new teams.

    With a new coaching staff, there may have been some temptation to make big splashes at the possible risk of long term fiscal stability.

    For the most part, though, the Rams resisted that temptation.

    Andrew Whitworth's signing was definitely a splash. Over the next year or two, he will likely be a stabilizing force on the Rams' OL (not to mention Jared Goff's best friend!). The Rams are paying him well, but in a couple of years, when age may catch up with him, the Rams won't be saddled with a long-term deal. Similarly, John Sullivan... another key short term addition, was signed to a one-year deal that gives the Rams time to groom a long-term solution at the center position.

    Same goes for Conner Barwin. He is a key piece of the 3-4 puzzle, and should thrive under Wade Phillips. But as a 30something, he'd be a risky long-term prospect, so his one-year deal makes sense.

    Another way to try to make a splash, while avoiding big ripples, is to sign players who are young and have upside, but do not yet demand elite money. Robert Woods and Kayvon Webster could prove to be examples of these types of signings.

    I think its clear that McVay and his staff wish to field a strong opening day lineup in 2017, while still retaining the ability to evaluate players and to hold off on most long-term decisions until they see who fits the new system and who does not.

    Will all this work? Who knows, but I have to say that its nice to be able to look at an approach and discern the logic behind it. I often did not feel that way when it came to personnel moves under Jeff Fisher. McVay seems to be a man with a plan.

  • #2
    Agree with everything in your splashes and ripples post... Even I was a Fisher fan I felt the same way about his moves and non moves... Not sure he had a over all plan and his management of the team lost him his job. Even his guys did not perform for him. Young McVay seems to have a plan laid out with his staff and management group it seems much more solid and defined! Also I like the way he expresses himself seems more open than fish who seemed to be trying to play with his cards face down and we were not allowed to know what came next. I could not be happier with the way things have turned out thus far. I hope for a really fun preseason and some real battles in games. If our young coach can keep these guys plugged into his system and plan not just for the first half but for the entire season game after game even we lose a tough one. Then I will consider the season a full on success even our record is not what we hope for. All the best of luck to our new coaches they will need it! Our division is still a tough knutt to crack!

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    • #3
      I am likewise impressed with the moves in free agency. No reaches. No overpayments. Solid players and prospects. The additions fit with the overall condition of the roster. I see McVay as having a much more organized and professional approach than Fisher, who basically ran a secret club for his cult of personality. I am curious about the role and input of Snead, both in the Fisher era and with McVay. How much of this is McVay's thinking, and how much is it Snead's without the limitations of Fisher's final say. The rookie draft picks will be very interesting to see also, in terms of the differences from the prior administration. It's all very interesting, and gives us something positive to pay attention to. Thank god we're not spending the offseason listening to Fisher's spin and expecting the sosa Rams.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Seacone View Post
        I am likewise impressed with the moves in free agency. No reaches. No overpayments. Solid players and prospects. The additions fit with the overall condition of the roster. I see McVay as having a much more organized and professional approach than Fisher, who basically ran a secret club for his cult of personality. I am curious about the role and input of Snead, both in the Fisher era and with McVay. How much of this is McVay's thinking, and how much is it Snead's without the limitations of Fisher's final say. The rookie draft picks will be very interesting to see also, in terms of the differences from the prior administration. It's all very interesting, and gives us something positive to pay attention to. Thank god we're not spending the offseason listening to Fisher's spin and expecting the sosa Rams.

        This is a very good point. Snead was a fairly green and young GM when he got hired. Now he has too have more of a say and can guide McVay. I get the feeling listing to McVay just the way he describes say a receivers route and body control ect. That has to be nice for Les to hear that type of details from your head coach when your job is to match the skill sets of the players to how the coaches want to use them. It's not hard to think on more then one occasion the Rams drafted players that either the GM got the wrong message or the coaching staff could not use the skills sets of the player drafted. Easy example is Tavon. Another one is Goff, the minute he was drafted Fisher had to go.

        I don't know if we will be better or worse this year but it won't be the same old crap.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by RamFanEsq View Post
          The metaphor that makes up this thread title expresses what I really like about the Rams' FA approach.

          Any team (subject to the ability to clear cap space), can try to make a big splash in FA by offering a lucrative contract to a well-know, big-name FA. While fans and the media will often praise moves of that type, there are countless examples of FAs who didn't pan out, or who ultimately because high-priced anchors on their new teams.

          With a new coaching staff, there may have been some temptation to make big splashes at the possible risk of long term fiscal stability.

          For the most part, though, the Rams resisted that temptation.
          The Rams didn't have enough room under the cap to go crazy so they stayed with in their limited means. An example would be Woods at WR over one of the 2 Redskin receivers.

          :helmet:

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mh-i View Post

            The Rams didn't have enough room under the cap to go crazy so they stayed with in their limited means. An example would be Woods at WR over one of the 2 Redskin receivers.
            They could have found the cap room and signed either if that was their priority. They chose a different route.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Rambos View Post


              This is a very good point. Snead was a fairly green and young GM when he got hired. Now he has too have more of a say and can guide McVay. I get the feeling listing to McVay just the way he describes say a receivers route and body control ect. That has to be nice for Les to hear that type of details from your head coach when your job is to match the skill sets of the players to how the coaches want to use them. It's not hard to think on more then one occasion the Rams drafted players that either the GM got the wrong message or the coaching staff could not use the skills sets of the player drafted. Easy example is Tavon. Another one is Goff, the minute he was drafted Fisher had to go.

              I don't know if we will be better or worse this year but it won't be the same old crap.
              The only change I would make is to say that the minute Fisher traded up to get Goff, is the minute he had to go. That trade was an absurb, high-priced gambit to get a QB, by a guy who doesn't understand contemporary offense, and was just shooting for the moon to save his job. He was pretty much doomed from the moment of that trade, whoever he picked, because neither Goff nor Wentz warranted that price. (And we could have had Prescott in the 3rd round, which I admit is 20/20 hindsight.) And then Fisher made sure he was done, by giving TA that overpriced extension (after overspending draft capital on TA). Pretty incredible that Snead has apparently survived his partnership with Fisher.

              I have high hopes Goff will turn into a winning NFL QB, but I don't see that he is a "special" prospect worth such a price and risk. It'll be easier to take after this draft, especially if we score with the picks we have.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RamFanEsq View Post

                They could have found the cap room and signed either if that was their priority. They chose a different route.
                Short of trading Tru I don't see who else they could have let go to gain more cap room without creating another hole to fill. I'm agreeing with the premise of your original post. When you have multiple must fill holes and limited options to create cap room you can't blow all your money on one or two positions. While you could be right that Woods could become elite and earn a larger contract I don't believe that was the Rams motivation in choosing him over the other two guys. I think it was more of a this is what we can afford move.
                :helmet:

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                • #9
                  I understand and generally endorse the concept of not signing free agents just because they are "name" guys. Too often people think because the guy is someone they've heard of, he automatically should be obtained if available. That said, the Rams almost NEVER go after an available skill position guy with a proven track record who might energize the fan base and create excitement, choosing instead to get the lesser known (or unknown to non-Rams fans) player. I question whether or not staking your fortunes on guys like Kayvon Webster AND Robert Woods is the right way to go when you have a horrendous offense and a QB who desperately needs a veteran presence to guide him as he (hopefully) matures into a decent starting QB. Someone who still has 3-4 years of quality football left- a Pierre Garcon, for instance. And I'm not saying I'm in love with Garcon, per-se, but a player of that caliber is to whom I'm referring. Maybe such a player, when coupled with guys like Pharoh Cooper, Nelson Spruce and Tyler Higbee (Did we give up on these guys as yet more examples of poor draft choices??) could be an upgrade and make a difference. Hopefully, McVay's vision will lead to success. But I can point to 14 years of lousy, losing football to feel the way I do. What we've done over multiple regimes hasn't worked. And I'd like to see a return to the bold approach which landed us Marshall Faulk via trade and a slew of others through free agency and the draft after a similar string of bad football in the 90's.

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                  • r8rh8rmike
                    The Sean McVay Culture Change
                    by r8rh8rmike
                    It's early, but the effect Sean McVay has had on one of the worst NFL teams in 2016, is absolutely striking. He came in saying he wanted to change the culture, and he has, in spades. From key personnel changes and sound decisions, to an attitude shift, to an emphasis on teamwork, preparedness, and execution, he's put his stamp on the Rams, with results that are sometimes hard to believe. Not only stats, but confidence level, and the ability to handle adversity.

                    Again, it's only 4 games into the season, and we've had the rug pulled out from under us for decades, but I think the Rams future looks bright with Sean McVay....
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                  • MauiRam
                    Competion In L.A.
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                    MMQB

                    As for the Rams, the Sean McVay hire makes all the sense in the world on paper. Take the 32nd-ranked offense in the NFL and put it in the hands of the man who helped Kirk Cousins grow into one of the most prolific and accurate quarterbacks in the NFL. (If that sounds like an exaggeration, recall that Cousins passed for 4,917 yards last season in Washington, third-most in the NFL, and completed 67% of his passes, good for seventh.)


                    The bigger unknown when it came to McVay,s hiring was how his age (31) would translate into ability to lead and manage a football team of 53 egos and personalities on a middling franchise one year into relocating to the second-most populous city in the United States.

                    Andrew Whitworth took the leap of faith when he left the team that drafted him in 2006, the Bengals, to join the Rams at 35 years old on a three-year, $36 million contract to anchor an offensive line that allowed 49 sacks in 2016. Whitworth is one of two players on the roster who is older than McVay, who was a high school freshman quarterback running the triple option at Marist School in Atlanta when Whitworth was a redshirt freshman at LSU in 2001. Adding Whitworth may prove to be the best decision McVay and GM Les Snead have made early in the process of turning around the Rams, not simply for his pass blocking but for his experience in McVay's offense. The scheme Whitworth learned under Jay Gruden in Cincinnati is, with slight variations, the same one McVay learned under Gruden in Washington. Former No. 1 overall pick Jared Goff spends much of his time with Whitworth quizzing him on how Andy Dalton handled certain situations in the offense.

                    In Whitworth's estimation, the message McVay would deliver this summer would resonate and had the potential to set a permanent tone for the season, good or bad.

                    You listen to him talk about defense, offense, special teams and you realize this guy knows football like no other. He's special in that way, Whitworth says. But there's something else that makes him special. I would imagine its very hard for a coach of his age to be as assertive as he has and cover the topics he has in a team meeting setting. Talking about character, about being accountable to one another, focus, discipline, the way we communicate with other.

                    I think it's a great place to start a football team. You see teams that are really successful when guys carry themselves the right way on and off the field.

                    Connor Barwin, another veteran free agent acquired this offseason by Snead, came away similarly impressed with McVay: He's figured out what he believes in and what he wants to stand for and what he wants the team to stand for, Barwin says. That's something that's important, and something somebody might not expect out of a young coach.

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                    -07-26-2017, 10:44 AM
                  • Curly Horns
                    So far, I'm very impressed with Sean McVay
                    by Curly Horns
                    I know, the Rams just hired him and we have yet to see any perfromance results, regardless, I'm very impressed. Just listening to him you can feel the enthusiasm and positive energy. Something I never felt from fisher. In my opinion he's an amazing young guy. I agree with those who describe him as mature beyond his years and somewhat Jon Gruden like.

                    I think he's going to be an awesome head coach, for many years to come, and I hope he does not burn out at a young age.
                    -01-15-2017, 11:03 AM
                  • KoaKoi
                    The Rams and the Anthem
                    by KoaKoi
                    Something about McVay that I thought was pretty cool. I like how he's approaching this, even if he's stealing it straight from another coach.

                    I was at the Cowboy preseason game, but didn't notice it. Apparently, Robert Quinn did his fist in the air thing during the national anthem. His response to why was some convoluted garble about ancestors. I'll let you look it up if you're interested in his response. That's not the reason I created this post.

                    What I actually found interesting, was what McVay is doing with the team during the anthem: He's doing exactly what Fisher did.

                    McVay has instructed the team to line up in the same way Fisher had them line up shoulder to shoulder, with the staff standing in a line behind them, saying he credits Fisher with putting in place a system that he admires and will continue to utilize. Perhaps because I'm used to seeing Rams do it that way, that's something I didn't notice at the game. Here's a couple quotes from McVay when asked about it.

                    “With coach Fisher, they’ve done a great job here the last couple of years having a very structured alignment with respect to what the national anthem represents,” said McVay. “And you’ll notice that we’ve continued on with that tradition. I thought that was something that was great. And then what we’ve said to the is ‘this is kind of how we want to go about it. If you have any feelings differently one way or the other, just come let me know so were not surprised about it.'”

                    “Certainly guys are entitled to their opinions but the guys that have done some demonstration definitely communicated that to us. But we have a lot of respect as an organization for what that national anthem represents and I think you see the alignment in the organization that we try to show before the kickoff. And that’s a credit to what they had done here before.”


                    Personally, I'd prefer these anthem protests didn't exist. I don't think ill of anybody that does something to make a statement, but I'd be lying if I said I didn't think it was annoying. It's kind of like being hustled on the street by a vendor. I know they have the right to be there and say something to me, but I really don't appreciate what they want to troll about and would prefer they left me alone. If only the media treated them like streakers and didn't give them the limelight about it. C'est la vie. I recall a Fisher response recently where he was asked about how he felt about it, and he talked about pre-game focus, and that he felt while guys are free to do as they wish regarding conduct during the anthem, he felt that moment was better used to focus on the game to be and feared it could alternatively be a distraction; better to reflect on how special it is to be in that moment as a part of the NFL. His teams didn't win or perform near as good as we would have liked, but I always did think he was a classy guy. I like that McVay is following this tradition......
                    -09-05-2017, 10:44 AM
                  • Nick
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                    PUBLISHED: April 10, 2017 at 4:32 pm | UPDATED: April 10, 2017 at 4:34 pm

                    THOUSAND OAKS — It’s a tradition on almost every team. Show up to camp, collect your T-shirt with the catchy, coach-speak slogan on the back and attempt to minimize the eye-rolling.

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                    “I think there’s some really good, new energy here,” quarterback Jared Goff said. “Coach McVay and the rest of his staff have done a great job exuding that energy and really letting us feel it. I think it’s really a fresh start for a lot of people. I think it’s a really good feeling. Just freshness is the best way to describe it.”

                    There’s plenty of work ahead. This phase of offseason work, which will continue for two weeks, will focus mostly on off-field strength and conditioning. Per NFL rules, practice-like simulations aren’t allowed until next month, but Monday represented an important moment for McVay and the Rams.

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                    -04-10-2017, 05:22 PM
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