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Jared Goff’s in-the-huddle speech that got the Rams rolling to Super Bowl LIII

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  • Jared Goff’s in-the-huddle speech that got the Rams rolling to Super Bowl LIII

    Jared Goff’s in-the-huddle speech that got the Rams rolling to Super Bowl LIII
    By Vincent Bonsignore Jan 20, 2019 24

    NEW​ ORLEANS — Rob Havenstein​ doesn’t​ exactly​ remember what the​ score was when​ it all​ went down.​ The Rams were​ struggling, he​​ knows that much. Between the crowd at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome — which roared so loudly it seemed like the Rams were constantly lining up alongside a Boeing 747 about to take off at LAX — and Drew Brees, Michael Thomas, Alvin Kamara and the revved-up New Orleans Saints defense, the Rams handled the first quarter of Sunday’s NFC Championship Game about as poorly as they could have imagined.

    A few more slip-ups like the ones they incurred to that point and they might as well kiss all their Super Bowl hopes and dreams goodbye.

    And that would have been a shame, given everything the Rams have been through this season and how far they have come since their return to Los Angeles. From the depths of the 4-12 hell they put everyone through in 2016 to the brink of pro football’s biggest prize, it has been a wild and miraculous ride.

    But there they were, shaken and wobbly and on the verge of turning what could have been a spectacular season into just a very good one. Yes, it was early in what would be a 26-23 overtime victory for the Rams. But you got the sense time was already running out.

    So Jared Goff huddled up the Rams offense and, in his own chill, laidback California way, basically told his teammates to shut up, listen up and get with it.

    This was long before one of the most egregious non-calls in the history of professional sports gave the Rams a sliver of hope late in the fourth quarter. Without question, Nickell Robey-Coleman was guilty of a pass interference penalty against Tommylee Lewis that should have given the Saints a fresh set of downs inside the Rams’ 5-yard line with under two minutes left in regulation. New Orleans could have either bled the clock before kicking a game-winning field goal or punched it in for a touchdown to go up by seven to leave very little time for the Rams to respond.

    In fact, Robey-Coleman was essentially trying to slam as hard as he could into Lewis — be it to break up the pass or, worst-case scenario, get called for the penalty.

    “I still would have been able to live with that,” Robey-Coleman said.

    Anything but giving up the sure touchdown, which it would have been had he done nothing at all.

    “As soon as I got up from the ground, I was looking for (a flag),” Robey-Coleman said. “I had to. It was natural. Because I knew I was low-key wrong.”

    And it was well before Dante Fowler got just enough body on Brees in overtime to force him to launch a pass so high into the air it seemed to hang there for an eternity before miraculously falling into the waiting arms of Rams safety John Johnson for an interception.

    “Felt like a minute 15 seconds,” Johnson told The Athletic. “Seriously, I think a minute and 15 seconds went off the clock before I caught it.”

    The heat Fowler created on Brees and Johnson’s interception set the Rams up at their own 46-yard-line – or not far outside of Greg Zuerlein’s field-goal kicking range.

    Said Fowler: “As a defense we’ve had a knack for coming up with the big play at the right time and we absolutely needed to do it right there. It felt so good to come up with a big play right there.”

    And certainly, it was well before Zuerlein calmly and cooly boomed a 57-yard field goal through the goal posts to send the Rams to the Super Bowl while simultaneously silencing a crowd that was so incredibly loud that Rams head coach Sean McVay said afterward he was dealing with a splitting headache.

    It’s nothing a trip to the Super Bowl can’t settle down, though.

    “I can’t even control myself when I hear that,” Rams center John Sullivan said. “It’s amazing.”

    The thing is, none of that is even possible without Goff first taking the Rams huddle by the throat and taking command of the situation with his team trailing 13-0 and teetering on disaster.

    Don’t worry about the noise, Goff told them. Don’t worry about the score. Don’t worry about what’s at stake or the uphill climb ahead. It’s time to get this done and it starts right now.

    “Jared came in the huddle and said, ‘This is how it’s going to be,’ ” Havenstein told The Athletic. “He gave us a little direction. It wasn’t life changing. It was, ‘Hey, this is my huddle. This is the way it’s going to be done. This is the way we’re going to roll.’ ”

    And the Rams offense’s reaction?

    “It was, ‘OK, cool,’ ” Havenstein said. “Let’s do it.”

    That drive ended with a Rams field goal — the key play being the fake punt the Rams converted on a fourth-and-5 at their own 30-yard-line — to cut the Saints’ lead to 13-3 and redirect momentum.

    The Rams defense would force punts on the Saints’ next two drives, ultimately getting Goff and the offense the ball with 1:52 remaining in the first half at the Rams’ 19-yard-line. What ensued was the turning point of the game. And it might finally end any remaining doubts of Goff as a franchise-caliber quarterback.

    Goff would later explain that the Superdome scene was “chaotic.” He had to mouth the play calls first to his linemen and then to his playmakers inside the huddle and then, at the line of scrimmage, essentially deliver signals and instructions that started with the widest player before working its way inside.

    “It sounds dumb, but it’s just gotta go down the line, like an assembly line,” Havenstein said of relaying the play call. “Tell one guy. That guy tells two others. Then it goes to another guy. He tells two others until all 11 get it.”

    With that as the backdrop, Goff went to work by completing passes of nine, 13 and 17 yards before dropping a perfectly thrown ball into the arms of Brandin Cooks up the left sideline for a 36-yard gain to the Saints’ 6-yard-line.

    Just like that, the Rams were in business. And when Todd Gurley rumbled in for a touchdown, the Saints’ lead was just 13-10.

    The Rams danced their way to the locker room at halftime, knowing full well they weathered a terrible storm to start the game only to put themselves in position to win it in the second half.

    Their defense deserves a ton of credit for keeping the score manageable. And the belief that head coach Sean McVay showed in his team by calling a fake punt on the Rams’ side of the field cannot be overlooked. On the fake, Johnny Hekker delivered a perfect throw to cornerback Sam Shields, who fought for the first down.

    But it all started with Goff, who came into Championship Sunday as the least talked about quarterback among the remaining four teams and the most likely to fall short of the Super Bowl. Really, there was no shame in that considering Brees, Tom Brady and MVP favorite Patrick Mahomes were the other three QBs.

    But still. The disrespect was real.

    Goff stood as tall as any of the quarterbacks on Sunday, overcoming a hostile environment that affected every part of the Rams’ offensive operation — namely the communication system in his helmet that broke down to start the game, forcing him to borrow teammate Sean Mannion’s helmet the first two series. Goff was able to set his team straight and, in many ways, carry the Rams to the Super Bowl.

    It was Goff who completed six passes for 52 yards in a critical third-quarter drive that resulted in a Rams touchdown to cut the Saints’ lead to 20-17. The score came on a clutch 1-yard pass from Goff to Tyler Higbee on third-and-goal.

    In the fourth quarter, Goff led the Rams 85 yards on nine plays to tie the game at 20-20 on Zuerlein’s 24-yard field goal. During the drive, Goff delivered a 39-yard pass to Gerald Everett and a 33-yard completion to Josh Reynolds.

    After the controversial non-pass interference call left the Saints with a 23-20 lead, Goff came through again by driving the Rams 45 yards for the game-tying field goal. There was 1:41 left in the game when the Rams got the ball. There were 15 seconds remaining when Zuerlein kicked a 48-yard field goal to tie the game.

    Among Goff’s big throws on that drive: a 19-yarder to Reynolds and a 16-yarder to Robert Woods.

    Then, finally, after Johnson’s interception, Goff avoided the rush and connected with Higbee for 12 yards and again for six to get the Rams close enough for Zuerlein to connect on the game-winning 57-yarder. All the while, Goff worked against the Saints and their frenzied 73,028 fans that made hearing almost impossible.

    “There were times he came to the sideline and said, ‘I can’t hear ****,’ ” Fowler told The Athletic.

    “I have never coached in an atmosphere like that, ever,” McVay said.

    The Rams didn’t make any excuses. And they certainly didn’t use it as a crutch.

    Goff wouldn’t let them.

    “Trying to hear was difficult and trying to communicate was difficult, but I think once we got into a rhythm outside of those first two or three drives, I felt pretty good,” Goff said. “I think once I was able to settle in and really understand what was coming through the helmet and being able to anticipate some stuff and then be able to be very direct with where I need to say it to, once I was able to do that, it was better.”

    It was a sneaky big performance by a quarterback most people slept on all week.

    “I don’t know if it was sneaky,” Havenstein corrected me, laughing. “It was pretty big. One hundred percent, he was big.”

    Goff finished with 297 yards on 25-of-40 passing. The numbers don’t jump out at you, but given the Superdome scene, the talented Saints defense he faced and the stage he operated on, it was a quintessential performance.

    Basically, it was everything the Rams envisioned after moving to the top of the 2016 draft to select Goff with the first overall pick.

    Three years later — including one rocky rookie season that left many people writing him off as a bust — Goff has the Rams in the Super Bowl.

    “The way he played today, I mean honestly the whole game, I can’t say enough about him,” Rams tackle Andrew Whitworth said. “His performance was amazing, and to beat Drew Brees in this arena, this is one special place to play. These guys are really good here and really hard to beat. You just can not say enough about Jared’s job today.”

    “He’s the same guy all the time,” Havenstein said. “It’s the NFC Championship Game. It’s a regular-season game. It’s OTAs. It’s lunch with the O-line. He’s the same guy. And that’s what you love about him.”

    And now he and the Rams are going to the Super Bowl.

  • #2
    I love hearing this kind of stuff. I've always had complete confidence in Goff, and knew he had the skill and temperament to be a difference maker in the NFL. People who doubt him do so at their own peril.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by r8rh8rmike View Post
      I love hearing this kind of stuff. I've always had complete confidence in Goff, and knew he had the skill and temperament to be a difference maker in the NFL. People who doubt him do so at their own peril.
      Yes, you have always expressed unwavering confidence in Goff.

      I did not support the deal that Fisher-Snead made to move up to draft him. However, I saw Goff's potential and have always rooted for him to make it. It drove me crazy when the sports talking heads began branding him a "bust" in 2016. Here was a very young guy, who did not play pro style offense in college, in his rookie year, playing for a coaching staff that was inept at offense and offensive player development, with all the pressure of being drafted #1 and being immediately regarded as a "franchise QB", put in as a starter after a historically bad offense had already cratered for the season, behind a terrible O line, and without the benefit of good skill players around him. In 2 of the 7 games he started that season, he played well enough for the team to win, but the team blew late 4th quarter leads, and he winds up 0-7. And that's it. The sportswriters of America are ready to declare him a bust. At the time, I didn't know if he would make it. But I knew he hadn't had any kind of reasonable opportunity to develop and show what he could do. It was ridiculous.

      Since then, it's just been amazing to witness his development. It's a case study in the importance of the right kind of coaching and environment needed for the development of a young QB, even a talented QB. The position is highly complex, and not self-taught. We've all seen many talented, young QBs ruined by the bad luck of falling into the wrong hands.

      Goff's leap from year 1 to 2 was startling, as was his development throughout year 2. This year, he picked right up where he left off, and then moved up several levels. As his skill and confidence increased, we saw him do the things that mark ascension to the "franchise QB" level. The late game competence, leadership and situational heroics. This kid is a baller and gamer. And what we have seen since the bye week is him fully attain that franchise QB status. The silver lining of Goff and the offense coming back sluggish from the bye was that they were put to the test of getting it going again and bringing it up to playoff level. And they did it, under Goff's leadership. And what we saw in NO leaves no doubt. This is Goff's team now, and I hope he is our QB for a long time.

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      • #4
        Exceptionally well written and reasoned post seacone. Nailed it right on the head.


        Ramming speed to all

        general counsel

        Comment


        • #5
          Even as I've acknowledged Goff has performed well beyond what I expected after the horrific start to his career, I've had periodic doubts and questions: "Is he really a guy we can win with or is he the byproduct of great talent and a great offensive coach? The last 5 games of the regular season did nothing to alleviate those concerns, as Goff looked uncomfortable and skittish at times. But I'll tell you, the game vs. New Orleans showed me a lot- and put to rest most of those doubts. For him to do what he did in a hostile environment, without an effective Gurley with what was on the line was nothing short of outstanding.

          You look at the great QBs throughout history, and most benefitted from playing for a solid head coach for a considerable time and had some weapons around them. Montana-Walsh. Brady-Belichick. Bradshaw-Noll. Staubach-Landry. Favre-Holmgren. Marino-Shula. We could go on. Goff is a long way from joining those guys, but the point is that greatness is rarely achieved without help. And to use McVay, Gurley, Woods and company as arguments AGAINST Goff's ability to be successful is to shortchange the man.

          Whether he can build on this season and maintain long-term success is a conversation for another day. But his performance against the Saints on Sunday is the type of performance we see from people destined for big things.

          Comment


          • #6
            Grazie signore Bonsignore. - And thanks Nick.

            Comment


            • #7
              One just has to give credit where credit is due. As much as I was afraid that Goff may become defined by that fumble/pick/tossed cookies, he did indeed rise to the occasion when the occasion came calling, in fact twice. He came from behind in the 4th quarter to tie it, and then did enough to lead to an OT win. One couldn't have asked for anything more. He's won two playoff games already, you know Belichek is gonna game plan something, but regardless of whether he presses or blitzes, I now have confidence that Goff will see, and can seize the moment when it presents itself.

              And while I'm giving credit, all the hype poured The Leg's way has finally borne fruit. Six kicks, each under increasing pressure, through the goalposts with no margin for error, gets him resigned. And what can you say about Snead? He found an edge rusher that with one play justified the trade. He found a running back that has stood taller than his height. There has been a Suh sighting and never more timely than now. One more game, one more opportunity for Peters, Talib, and Barron to still earn their stripes. Lady Luck has stayed the course for the Rams till now, and since she is a fickle mistress you never know where she'll pop up next, but I truly have confidence that this group doesn't need more luck and still has one more game of perseverance in them.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by adarian_too View Post
                One just has to give credit where credit is due. As much as I was afraid that Goff may become defined by that fumble/pick/tossed cookies, he did indeed rise to the occasion when the occasion came calling, in fact twice. He came from behind in the 4th quarter to tie it, and then did enough to lead to an OT win. One couldn't have asked for anything more. He's won two playoff games already, you know Belichek is gonna game plan something, but regardless of whether he presses or blitzes, I now have confidence that Goff will see, and can seize the moment when it presents itself.

                And while I'm giving credit, all the hype poured The Leg's way has finally borne fruit. Six kicks, each under increasing pressure, through the goalposts with no margin for error, gets him resigned. And what can you say about Snead? He found an edge rusher that with one play justified the trade. He found a running back that has stood taller than his height. There has been a Suh sighting and never more timely than now. One more game, one more opportunity for Peters, Talib, and Barron to still earn their stripes. Lady Luck has stayed the course for the Rams till now, and since she is a fickle mistress you never know where she'll pop up next, but I truly have confidence that this group doesn't need more luck and still has one more game of perseverance in them.
                What is with this "flagging for potential spam" ?? If you said it was too "controversial I'd get it. ...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Adrian, its done by software, nothing to do with the mods mate.

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                  • RockinRam
                    California Cool - By Michael Silver Jan.19, 2019
                    by RockinRam
                    EDIT: This was written by Michael Silver on January 29th, not the 19th. Sorry for the confusion.




                    Jared Goff's football career has been a roller-coaster ride, but the 24-year-old Rams quarterback offsets all highs and lows with an unwavering chill.



                    LOS ANGELES --The mood was tense. The stakes were enormous. The din was deafening -- and that was just in the Los Angeles Rams' huddle.

                    Trailing 13-0 early in the second quarter of the NFC Championship Game in New Orleans two Sundays ago, his team rattled by a cacophonous Superdome crowd he'd later describe as "the loudest thing I'll ever experience ... disorienting ... dizzying," 24-year-old quarterback Jared Goff finally snapped. Yet it wasn't the relentless roar of the 73,028 fans that triggered the young passer; rather, it was the well-intentioned intervention of some of the equally besieged men in his midst.

                    "He took control in a way that I'd never seen before," veteran tackle Andrew Whitworth recalled last Thursday. "It was crazy loud, and a bunch of us kept trying to chime in and give input, and he just said, 'Hey! Everybody shut up. I'll get you guys into the right places. This is my show. I've got it.' First time I've ever heard him do that ... and you know what? Everybody listened."

                    Said guard Rodger Saffold: "He said it with some bass in his voice. That was pretty cool. It was like, OK, Jared -- I see you. The noise was insane, but the fact that he was able to settle us down, show his leadership and lead us to victory shows you how much he's grown these last three years. He had so much poise -- and that's the biggest thing you need to know about Jared Goff: He has poise, win or lose."

                    After spurring the Rams to a 26-23, overtime victory over the Saints, Goff charged onto the field and made some noise of his own. As he recalled last Wednesday during an interview at his home near Calabasas, California, that will air on NFL Network's "GameDay Morning" on Super Sunday, "As soon as we got a few points on the board, it started to get a little more quiet. The more we'd score, the more quiet it'd get. You know, after a big play, it'd be dead silent. And when Greg (Zuerlein) hit that (game-winning, 57-yard) field goal, all you could hear was us screaming."


                    Now, Goff and the Rams have a chance to make some legacy-defining noise in Atlanta, where on Sunday they'll face living legend Tom Brady and the New England Patriots in Super Bowl LIII at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. The matchup between a pair of quarterbacks raised in Northern California a generation apart is not one Goff will take lightly; he called the opportunity to compete against the 41-year-old Brady, who has been to eight previous Super Bowls and won five, "an honor."

                    That said, he is highly unlikely to get overwhelmed by the enormity...
                    -01-29-2019, 03:17 PM
                  • Nick
                    Rams win overtime thriller on Greg Zuerlein 57-yard field goal to reach Super Bowl
                    by Nick
                    Rams win overtime thriller on Greg Zuerlein 57-yard field goal to reach Super Bowl
                    By RICH HAMMOND | [email protected] | Orange County Register
                    PUBLISHED: January 20, 2019 at 3:38 pm | UPDATED: January 20, 2019 at 9:04 pm

                    NEW ORLEANS — This song, a rhapsody in blue and yellow, started that nervy day in Jan. 2017 when the Rams hired a kid to coach their quarterback bust. So the world thought. That narrative took in its final gasp Sunday afternoon, moments before a field goal cleared the bar and the Superdome finally exhaled.

                    Sean McVay and Jared Goff. Their destinies would be tied together no matter what, whether — as once widely thought — they would fail miserably or whether they would lead the Rams to success. No one in the organization thought it would happen this soon. In two years, the Rams went from punchline to champions.

                    The Rams, who won four games in 2016, are going to the Super Bowl thanks to their 24-year-old quarterback and their coach, who turns 33 this week. Their nerve, grit and skill showed the way Sunday in a brilliant team effort as the Rams rallied to beat New Orleans 26-23 in the NFC championship game. They will meet Tom Brady and the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl in Atlanta on Feb. 3.

                    “I’m just happy for the city, happy for the team and happy for Sean,” Rams owner Stan Kroenke said. “He has done a fantastic job. Our fans are wonderful and I’ve felt that support, so I appreciate that.”

                    Greg Zuerlein’s 57-yard field-goal attempt easily sailed through, 3:17 into overtime, and the Rams scattered across the field in celebration as Saints fans tossed trash, rightfully upset with a non-call late in the fourth quarter that likely cost them the game. The Rams cared not, and celebrated like kids.

                    McVay became the youngest coach ever to reach the Super Bowl. Goff became the first quarterback to win a NFC championship before his 25th birthday. They will face Tom Brady and the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl on Feb. 3 in Atlanta.

                    “Definitely went through the whole gamut of emotions when the field goal went through,” Goff said, “from excited to emotional to just overwhelmingly happy. Very excited, man. I get to the play in the Super Bowl. We deserved it. We earned it.”

                    Most of the Rams hadn’t been born on Jan. 20, 1980, when the Los Angeles-based Rams last made the Super Bowl. Many of them were on other teams, or in college, in Jan. 2016, when the NFL approved the team’s relocation from St. Louis. Many of them were brought in after Jan. 2017, after the Rams hired McVay.

                    Now they’re going to the Super Bowl together, thanks to an unlikely climax to an unlikely two-year rise. McVay last attended a Super Bowl in 2000. He was 14 years old when the (St. Louis) Rams beat Tennessee, and the game was played in Atlanta, where McVay went to high school.

                    “It’s surreal,” McVay said. “You’re so happy...
                    -01-21-2019, 05:12 AM
                  • MauiRam
                    Rams QB coach likes Goff's growth, but 'he's far from a finished product'
                    by MauiRam
                    Aug 24, 2017
                    Alden Gonzalez
                    ESPN Staff Writer

                    THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. -- There was never really one specific thing that Jared Goff needed to improve on as he entered 2017. He was -- and still is -- only 22 years old, a second-year quarterback in his first year under a new system, coming off a rookie season that was substandard by every measure. Greg Olson, the Los Angeles Rams' new quarterbacks coach, couldn't specify.

                    "We felt, as a staff, when we put all our eyes on him, that there were a number of things that he could get better at," Olson said. "From footwork to progressions to timing in the passing game, there were a lot of things there that we felt like he needed to work on."

                    The list remains daunting, even in the midst of his most encouraging performance to date.

                    Goff went 16-of-20 for 160 yards while playing almost the entire first half against the Oakland Raiders on Saturday night. He led the Rams to two touchdowns and a field goal in four drives, the first of which ended with a 23-yard touchdown pass to a wide-open Cooper Kupp. It was the type of stretch that made one believe that the former No. 1 overall pick may actually thrive one day; that this offense, rebuilt over the last five months, may finally be good again.

                    Goff acknowledged the confidence boost a night like that can trigger, "But it wasn't like it was shocking," he added. "It's something that we expected to do."

                    More people play on ESPN than anywhere else. Join or create a league in the No. 1 Fantasy Football game! Sign up for free!
                    Olson's excitement was tempered.

                    "Believe me," Olson said of Goff, "he's far from a finished product. He would tell you that. And we know that; we understand that. But we're happy with the growth so far and the way he's approached the process here of getting better. There's a lot of positive things here that have come out, and he's just gotta continue that constant, daily improvement."

                    Olson was the Rams' offensive coordinator from 2006 to 2007, when the team operated out of St. Louis. He worked with an in-his-prime Marc Bulger then, one of numerous quarterbacks who have been under his tutelage. Prior to rejoining the Rams, Olson spent 15 years as either a quarterbacks coach or an offensive coordinator -- sometimes both -- with seven different organizations. He instructed veterans like Jeff Garcia, Kordell Stewart and Brian Griese, young players like Rex Grossman, Blaine Gabbert and Blake Bortles.

                    In Goff, Olson sees someone who "wants to get better" and "wants to realize his potential." He sees someone who has "tried to wipe the slate clean from his rookie season," but also "took it as a learning experience." He sees someone with a "good attitude" and a "strong work ethic." And he sees someone who...
                    -08-25-2017, 09:40 AM
                  • Nick
                    Bonsignore: The ‘perfect throw’ that showed how much progress Jared Goff has made
                    by Nick
                    The ‘perfect throw’ that showed how much progress Jared Goff has made
                    By Vincent Bonsignore Aug 7, 2019 5

                    NAPA, Calif. — On a day when Jared Goff shredded the Oakland Raiders in the first of two joint practices, the Rams quarterback’s very best play wasn’t scripted, programmed or relayed to him. And it wasn’t part of Sean McVay’s deep and creative play call sheet.

                    In fact, the situation called for Goff to go off script and tap into his footwork, vision and improvisational skills to create a big play when it appeared there was no play available.

                    That area of Goff’s game has been knocked by critics over his first three seasons. It’s the source of the backhanded compliment often paid to him as a “system quarterback” who is capable of carrying out orders when the pocket is clean and everything is perfectly flowing on schedule. However, the unsaid implication of that label is that Goff is much more compromised the second things go awry and he has to become a playmaker.

                    It’s not an entirely unfounded complaint; it’s just a bit overplayed. In a league in which quarterbacking under duress is a way of life, Goff has stacked up the necessary numbers and victories to undisputedly solidify his place among the elite quarterbacks in the game.

                    He will never be Patrick Mahomes when it comes to using athletic ability and one of the great throwing arms in all of football to make Houdini-like plays. But Goff’s precise footwork, feel for a pocket and ability to keep his eyes focused downfield — even on the move — allow him to make things happen when he has to make a play.

                    Three years into his partnership with McVay, Goff’s command of the offense is fueling the rising confidence in that part of his game. So far in training camp, he is taking more chances. And instead of simply throwing the ball away or taking a sack when under pressure, Goff has been a bit more daring in being a playmaker.

                    “It just continues to keep growing like I always talk about,” he said. “I can’t specifically say anything in particular, but just me and Sean continue to get on the same page, I think it’s continuing to grow. And then, just my understanding of everything will always continue to grow with Sean as well.”

                    Which brings us back to the play Goff made in Wednesday’s practice with the Raiders that quickly turned into a highlight reel for the 24-year-old.

                    Maybe it was the fact that his parents were in attendance. Or perhaps it was the comfort of being home in the Bay Area. Whatever the reason, the former Cal star had his strongest day of training camp.

                    In a spectacular 11-on-11 red zone period, Goff came up with multiple scoring throws, the best of which was the laser beam that split two Raiders defensive backs for a touchdown pass to tight end Gerald Everett in the back of the end zone. With so much going into the play, not the least of which was the mutual...
                    -08-08-2019, 02:06 PM
                  • MauiRam
                    Jared Goff's father: 'He's going to be great. He's never not been'
                    by MauiRam
                    Los Angeles Rams Blog

                    Alden GonzalezESPN Staff Writer

                    7:52 AM PTIRVINE, Calif. -- Jared Goff has been here before. He's been young for the position, been counted on before he was ready, been under center for a team that hardly stood a chance. Goff was a teenager and a true freshman when he started every game for a Cal program that went 1-11 in 2013, losing 10 times by at least a couple of touchdowns.

                    "I don’t think people understand how difficult that was for an 18-year-old kid," Goff's father, Jerry, said in a recent phone conversation. "Unless you’ve been through it, you don't know how hard that is."

                    Jerry brings it up to prove a point -- that his son knows what it's like to get his ass kicked.

                    More importantly, that he knows how to get up, dust himself off and keep going.

                    Goff was the No. 1 pick for a Los Angeles Rams team that moved up 14 spots to select him, but he never challenged for the starting quarterback job during training camp and ultimately never won a game. He went 0-7 over the final seven weeks of a 2016 season that finished with a 4-12 record, absorbing 26 sacks while putting up some of the NFL's worst passing numbers.

                    A week later, Goff was back at the Rams' facility, poring through film even though he didn't even have a head coach.

                    He already had moved on to the biggest offseason of his life.

                    "He was chosen in a spot where there's a lot of expectations, and he embraces that," Jerry said. "He really, adamantly wants to let everybody know, through his production, that he is the guy and worthy of all the Rams did to get him. I think people are going to see that moving forward."

                    The Rams are counting on new head coach Sean McVay (right) to tap into the potential of Jared Goff. Kirby Lee/USA TODAY Sports
                    The Rams have since done everything they can to tap into Goff's potential. They took a chance on a 31-year-old Sean McVay, now the youngest head coach in modern NFL history, in large part because his offense can be so quarterback friendly. They guaranteed $15 million to a 35-year-old left tackle, Andrew Whitworth, because he remains one of the game's best pass blockers. They signed Robert Woods, a 25-year-old receiver, to a five-year, $34 million contract. And they used three of their first four picks on pass-catchers, even though they drafted four the year before.

                    But it's what Goff himself has done that has people around him encouraged.

                    He basically spent the entire offseason at the Rams' facility, immersing himself in the new playbook, adding 10 pounds to his willowy frame and displaying a leadership and an ownership of this offense that he never did last season. He has been exceedingly eager.

                    "It's my team to lead and my team to direct and control and command," Goff said. "I don't take that lightly."
                    ...
                    -08-01-2017, 11:36 PM
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