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  • C.J. Anderson: Gurley Was 'More Hurt Than We Thought" When He Signed With Rams

    C.J. Anderson says Todd Gurley was 'more hurt than what we thought' when he signed with the Rams

    Gurley barely saw the field in the playoffs, but the Rams have insisted that he was completely healthy

    by Sean Wagner-McGough
    @seanjwagner
    15 hrs ago • 4 min read

    It's been two weeks since the Super Bowl and the mystery surrounding Todd Gurley's strange absence has yet to be cleared up.

    All along, the Rams have maintained that Gurley was healthy during the playoffs and attributed his lack of playing time to football reasons -- with Gurley saying he simply got out-played by C.J. Anderson in the NFC Championship Game and Sean McVay saying he didn't do a good enough job getting his star running back involved. To no one's surprise, neither of those responses have been considered satisfactory answers to the biggest mystery of the playoffs.

    On Tuesday, Anderson provided more support to the theory that Gurley was dealing with a knee injury during the playoffs, hence his decreased workload. During an appearance on FS1's "Undisputed," Anderson revealed that when he arrived in Los Angeles, Gurley was more hurt than anyone initially thought, including the Rams and Gurley.

    "He was more hurt than what we thought," Anderson said. "The injury was a little bit more than what everybody in the building thought, including himself."

    So what was the injury? Anderson described it as a sprained knee, but he couldn't call it that with any kind of certainty.

    "He'd never really tell me. It was tough. I would say sprained knee," Anderson said. "Obviously, it's the same knee injury he's had before in his career. Obviously, I had surgery on my meniscus and once you have a knee, you always have a knee. So it aggravates. If he was getting a lot of touches earlier in the year -- obviously, him being one of the best running backs that probably was the case."

    Gurley dealt with a knee injury at both the beginning and the end of the regular season, which led to the Rams sitting him for their final two games of the season and signing Anderson to fill in. Anderson played well in relief of Gurley in Weeks 16 and 17, rushing for 299 yards and two touchdowns as the Rams secured a first-round playoff bye.

    When it came time for their playoff run to begin against the Cowboys in the divisional round, Anderson and Gurley shared touches, and both of them thrived. Gurley rushed for 115 yards and a touchdown on 16 carries while Anderson racked up 123 yards and two touchdowns on 23 carries.

    Gurley certainly looked healthy.

    ​​​​​​​



    But Gurley was almost entirely absent in the NFC title game, garnering four carries for 10 yards and dropping a couple of passes in the early going while Anderson carried the ball 16 times for 44 yards.

    "When we came in, we knew both of us were going to be used," Anderson said about the NFC Championship Game. "Now, I don't think it was a hot-hand thing because it was more like -- it was up front. I was receptive to tell like, 'If Todd wants to go he wants to go.' And I was OK with that. Obviously, he got them there, 21 touchdowns this year, what he's done in this league since he's been in has been great. So it was more like, 'C.J., we're going to play you, but if our guy wants the ball and if he wants to go and he wants to do this, then we're going to roll with 30,' and that was OK with me."

    After the win over the Saints, McVay indicated that he'd try to get Gurley more involved in the Super Bowl while Gurley sounded grateful that he would get another chance to contribute after a no-show against the Saints. Gurley took on the majority of the touches in the Super Bowl, but once again, his involvement was lacking. Against the Patriots, Gurley carried the ball only 10 times for 35 yards.

    His lack of involvement that can be at least partially attributed to the fact that the Patriots' defense stymied the Rams' offense and limited them to one field goal and 4.3 yards per play, but it's still concerning that the running back who signed a monster extension less than a year ago carried the 10 times in the Super Bowl after being one of the Rams' most important players over the past couple seasons.

    On the one hand, this could all be easily explained away by his knee troubles. On the other hand, maybe the Rams simply felt like Anderson was playing better than Gurley and gave them the best chance to win. Both would be cause for concern, because either Gurley is dealing with a nagging knee injury that could bother him in the years to come (as Anderson said, "once you have a knee, you always have a knee") or Gurley managed to get out-played by a running back who joined the Rams in mid-December.

    Gurley will almost assuredly be back next season to prove that the strange ending to his season was nothing more than an aberration, but it's not clear if the Rams will bring Anderson back. If the Rams do re-sign him, Anderson understands that he won't be replacing Gurley, despite what unfolded in the playoffs.

    "It's Todd's team," Anderson said. "It's still Todd's team, no matter what happens, even if I come back."

  • JPPT1974
    replied
    He played in the regular season. And the team could had really needed him in the post season had he not gotten hurt when it was said to when it all came down to it. Imagine him healthy for the Super Bowl. May had won against the Patriots! Had he been healthy.

    Leave a comment:


  • ManofGod
    replied
    Originally posted by NJ Ramsfan1 View Post

    You obviously have major comprehension issues way beyond this discussion so I'll be the bigger man and comment no further.
    Well as you all say we are ignorant & dumb, so thank you again sir.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ewreck
    replied
    Obviously CJ is a liar as both Gurley and McVay said our pro bowl, touchdown machine isn't/wasn't hurt. Most coaches would park their #1 offensive weapon in the two most important games of the season. It's called strategery. Yes, sarcasm.

    Leave a comment:


  • NJ Ramsfan1
    replied
    Originally posted by ManofGod View Post

    And this post paints my picture ever so clearly. Thank you for allowing me to breathe and utilize the internet massa.
    You obviously have major comprehension issues way beyond this discussion so I'll be the bigger man and comment no further.

    Leave a comment:


  • ManofGod
    replied
    Originally posted by NJ Ramsfan1 View Post

    Oh, so because Gurley is from your area he's absolved from being questioned? At least now we're clear on the REAL reason you feel the need to defend him.

    We're simply on very different sides of this issue. You see a racial boogeyman around every corner. I simply see a situation in which fans are understandably frustrated in the lack of clarity and transparency about an event that can only be categorized as incredibly strange that occurred at the worst possible time. And it's apparent you cannot or are unwilling grasp the concept of teams/athletes having certain obligations to those who make it possible for them to ply their trade without spouting inflammatory nonsense about subservience and bowing down. One need not do either to simply offer an honest account of themselves.

    On your other point, yes, team owners DO HAVE privilege- as they should. They're the ones who own the team. They're the ones who put up the financing. They're the ones who pay the bills and the salaries. And the players are rewarded handsomely for their efforts. Suggesting they're in any way exploited is asinine. One can make an argument that NFL players are underpaid compared to their NBA and MLB brethren, but that's the fault of the weak leadership of the Players' Union, not the owners. Collective bargaining exists in the NFL just as it does every other major sport, and the players have a big hand in their salaries and rights, so let's put away the false narrative that sports figures are somehow being held captive to the whims of the big, bad owners because it's a load of garbage.

    Though I totally disagree with the way this situation has been handled, I won't harbor lingering ill will towards Gurley. As a man and as a fan, I certainly hope he's healthy and makes his money.
    And this post paints my picture ever so clearly. Thank you for allowing me to breathe and utilize the internet massa.

    Leave a comment:


  • NJ Ramsfan1
    replied
    Originally posted by ManofGod View Post

    So you still wanna respond huh? Ok, well the only privilege I see is that on the part of the owners who run this league like a dictatorship. The landscape of the NFL is completely different from that of the other major sports leagues & that fact is discussed on a weekly basis on all of the major networks. And yes these topics will wll ring "hollow' to you as you could simply never understand some things, it takes a special human being to open your mind in this regard. You do not realize it, but you are in fact asking that the athlete (b/c you purchase a tix or buy a jersey) should in turn bow down & become subservient to you. Sir get over yourself you are merely a fan & nothing more. Todd and I are from the same area, and this is the same knee he hurt in college, this is a psychological issue in addition to many other as this could cut his career short. On the back of signing this new contract he wanted nothing more than to show & prove, and to have the season turn out as it had......its tuff, but again you only focus on your feelings. These are human beings man, not simply pawns for your enjoyment.
    Oh, so because Gurley is from your area he's absolved from being questioned? At least now we're clear on the REAL reason you feel the need to defend him.

    We're simply on very different sides of this issue. You see a racial boogeyman around every corner. I simply see a situation in which fans are understandably frustrated in the lack of clarity and transparency about an event that can only be categorized as incredibly strange that occurred at the worst possible time. And it's apparent you cannot or are unwilling grasp the concept of teams/athletes having certain obligations to those who make it possible for them to ply their trade without spouting inflammatory nonsense about subservience and bowing down. One need not do either to simply offer an honest account of themselves.

    On your other point, yes, team owners DO HAVE privilege- as they should. They're the ones who own the team. They're the ones who put up the financing. They're the ones who pay the bills and the salaries. And the players are rewarded handsomely for their efforts. Suggesting they're in any way exploited is asinine. One can make an argument that NFL players are underpaid compared to their NBA and MLB brethren, but that's the fault of the weak leadership of the Players' Union, not the owners. Collective bargaining exists in the NFL just as it does every other major sport, and the players have a big hand in their salaries and rights, so let's put away the false narrative that sports figures are somehow being held captive to the whims of the big, bad owners because it's a load of garbage.

    Though I totally disagree with the way this situation has been handled, I won't harbor lingering ill will towards Gurley. As a man and as a fan, I certainly hope he's healthy and makes his money.

    Leave a comment:


  • Varg6
    replied
    Originally posted by ManofGod View Post

    So you still wanna respond huh? Ok, well the only privilege I see is that on the part of the owners who run this league like a dictatorship. The landscape of the NFL is completely different from that of the other major sports leagues & that fact is discussed on a weekly basis on all of the major networks. And yes these topics will wll ring "hollow' to you as you could simply never understand some things, it takes a special human being to open your mind in this regard. You do not realize it, but you are in fact asking that the athlete (b/c you purchase a tix or buy a jersey) should in turn bow down & become subservient to you. Sir get over yourself you are merely a fan & nothing more. Todd and I are from the same area, and this is the same knee he hurt in college, this is a psychological issue in addition to many other as this could cut his career short. On the back of signing this new contract he wanted nothing more than to show & prove, and to have the season turn out as it had......its tuff, but again you only focus on your feelings. These are human beings man, not simply pawns for your enjoyment.
    Okay dude, I've read both sides at this point, and I've followed NJ's posts for a long time as well. I don't really get where this rhetoric is coming from (or how it's deserved). Don't you think you're being a bit harsh? You're really insinuating a lot based on very little, in my mind anyway.

    I can perfectly understand Gurley wanting to keep things private, and maybe that's what he needs to do in order to get better from a psychological standpoint (because, somehow, you seem to have insider info about this). I say this both seriously and sarcastically, just to be completely clear. Again, to me, I don't necessarily think he has to say anything at this point, it's his choice. But from a fan's perspective, I get why it's frustrating. Because it is. I'm a fan too and I would like to know what happened, but if that can't happen, then so be it. Frankly, all I care about is him getting back to how he's been playing most of his career: like the beast that he is. This team deserves to finish what it started. We're too talented to not get at least one Super Bowl win with McVay and the squad he's put together. Can we at least all agree on that?

    Leave a comment:


  • ManofGod
    replied
    Originally posted by NJ Ramsfan1 View Post

    I am angered when the "exploitation" and "slavery" cards are played when talking about athletes who have tremendous privilege. It rings hollow. And while money and privilege in no way should mean athletes should bow and be subservient, they still have certain obligations since they rely on a viewing and paying public to ply their trade. This is what is being lost in this dialogue.

    And I'm curious as to "what other posts" I've made over the years that would suggest differently. I am not one who believes these guys should just "shut up and play", but I DO believe most athletes lack a complete understanding of why their words and actions are sometimes criticized.
    So you still wanna respond huh? Ok, well the only privilege I see is that on the part of the owners who run this league like a dictatorship. The landscape of the NFL is completely different from that of the other major sports leagues & that fact is discussed on a weekly basis on all of the major networks. And yes these topics will wll ring "hollow' to you as you could simply never understand some things, it takes a special human being to open your mind in this regard. You do not realize it, but you are in fact asking that the athlete (b/c you purchase a tix or buy a jersey) should in turn bow down & become subservient to you. Sir get over yourself you are merely a fan & nothing more. Todd and I are from the same area, and this is the same knee he hurt in college, this is a psychological issue in addition to many other as this could cut his career short. On the back of signing this new contract he wanted nothing more than to show & prove, and to have the season turn out as it had......its tuff, but again you only focus on your feelings. These are human beings man, not simply pawns for your enjoyment.

    Leave a comment:


  • Curly Horns
    replied
    I believe the Rams followed the NFL's injury report policy. I am not aware of anything else that would require the Rams or Gurley to go above and beyond the policy.

    Below is a link to the 2017 policy:

    https://operations.nfl.com/media/268...ort-policy.pdf

    Leave a comment:


  • NJ Ramsfan1
    replied
    Originally posted by Curly Horns View Post
    Personally, I don't feel as though I deserve to know. If they want to disclose then great. If they don't want to then that's fine. That's just me.

    I have a strong respect for other people's privacy and that's not to say others here do not have the same respect. It often seems that we now live in a society filled with expectations that nothing should be kept private.

    Anyways, since this is possibly a health issue concerning Gurley, one of the first things that came to mind was HIPAA. I found several articles two of which I have posted below.




    Athletes Do Not Leave Their HIPAA Rights At The Locker Room Door
    By Elizabeth Litten on July 21, 2015
    POSTED IN ARTICLES, PRIVACY & SECURITY
    HIPAA has made an unlikely appearance twice already this month in news reports involving famous athletes.

    Between the Pierre-Paul medical record tweet by ESPN reporter Adam Schefter earlier this month (discussed by my partner and fellow blogger Bill Maruca here) and the ticker-tape parade featuring confetti made of shredded (but apparently legible) medical information raining down on U.S. Women’s soccer team in New York City (reported by WFMY news here), it seems HIPAA breaches and athletes have had an uncanny affinity for one another this summer, particularly in New York City.

    Setting the attenuated coincidence of these events aside, the Pierre-Paul incident provides an opportunity to review when medical information that relates to one’s employment is protected under HIPAA and when it isn’t.

    In 2002, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the agency responsible for enforcing HIPAA, considered a comment to a proposed HIPAA regulation suggesting that “health information related to professional athletes should qualify as an employment record,” and, thus, not be considered protected health information under HIPAA. HHS was quite clear in responding that a professional athlete has the same HIPAA rights as any other individual:

    If this comment is suggesting that the records of professional athletes should be deemed “employment records” even when created or maintained by health care providers and health plan, the Department disagrees. No class of individuals should be singled out for reduced privacy.

    HHS refused to provide a definition of “employment record”, fearing that it might “lead to the misconception that certain types of information are never protected health information, and will put the focus incorrectly on the nature of the information rather than the reasons for which” the information was obtained.

    HHS went on to explain how and when protected health information might become “employment record” information:

    For example, drug screening test results will be protected health information when the provider administers the test to the employee, but will not be protected health information when, pursuant to the employee’s authorization, the test results are provided to the … employer and placed in the employee’s employment record.

    HHS further clarified that:

    … medical information needed for an employer to carry out its obligations under FMLA, ADA, and similar laws, as well as files or records related to occupational injury, disability insurance eligibility, sick leave requests and justifications, drug screening results, workplace medical surveillance, and fitness-for-duty tests of employees, may be part of the employment records maintained by … an employer.

    Going back to Pierre-Paul, the mere fact that his injury could affect his ability to perform as a professional athlete did not automatically turn the protected health information related to the injury (the medical record created by the hospital) into “employment records” exempt from HIPAA protection. It isn’t unless and until protected health information is disclosed to the employer pursuant to the individual’s authorization that it becomes an “employment record” no longer subject to HIPAA. Even if an individual’s disclosure of medical records is a condition of employment (apparently not the case in Pierre-Paul’s situation), it is the individual’s authorization that allows its disclosure, not the category or class of the individual.





    Handling HIPAA Rules In Sports: Why Athlete Privacy Matters

    jennacyprus
    April 18, 2016 976 Views

    HIPAA breaches are all too common, and the number of reported cases has grown significantly over the last decade. Most often associated with medical professionals and healthcare centers, these breaches can lead to serious legal issues, including medical negligence claims and professionals losing their licenses. However, it’s not only relegated to these areas. It can also play a role in sports when the media gets ahold of a major injury.

    Athletes Have HIPAA Rights Too

    HIPAA breaches are all too common, and the number of reported cases has grown significantly over the last decade. Most often associated with medical professionals and healthcare centers, these breaches can lead to serious legal issues, including medical negligence claims and professionals losing their licenses. However, it’s not only relegated to these areas. It can also play a role in sports when the media gets ahold of a major injury.

    Athletes Have HIPAA Rights Too

    When a major athlete gets hurt, it’s not uncommon for the media to know every detail of their prognosis and treatment. What’s less clear, however, is how much permission these athletes have given regarding the release of this information. Athletes don’t simply check their HIPAA rights at the locker room door, after all.

    HIPAA regulations should come into play when athletes undergo any kind of medical procedure, whether it’s a surgery or physical therapy. If a tennis player chooses to disclose the fact that she’s using rebounder nets as a part of her physical therapy, that’s her prerogative, but others don’t have the right to release the information for her, even if she’s famous.

    There have actually been several cases in which the medical records of major athletes have been shared via public means, and violated the patient’s rights. Most recently, ESPN reporter Adam Schefter tweeted the medical record of Jason Andrew Pierre-Paul, exposing private information that subjected the reporter to a lawsuit and ended in the firing of two hospital employees who leaked the records.

    After Pierre-Paul lost his finger and other parts of his right hand in a firework accident during his Independence Day celebration last year, he was rushed to Jackson Memorial Hospital for treatment. It wasn’t long before the press had a hold of his medical information and published it.

    In the legal aftermath that followed, Jackson Memorial Hospital portrayed a good example of how to handle the situation. They quickly published the following statement:

    “During the investigation of a breach that occurred in July 2015, Jackson Health System became a party to related litigation. It is our policy that we do not comment during pending litigation. That litigation has now been settled. As part of our investigation into the breach, it was discovered that two employees inappropriately accessed the patient’s health record. That finding resulted in the termination of both employees. Protecting the privacy of our patients is a top priority at Jackson Health System. Any time we have allegations of a breach, we immediately and thoroughly investigate.”

    Policies Protect Athlete Rights

    There have been discussions in the past about whether or not public figures’ health records should be made public; but in 2002, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reinforced the policy. “No class of individuals should be singled out for reduced privacy,” the statement said.

    There’ll always be certain privacy mandates that’ll need to be carried out according to HIPAA regulations to ensure the privacy and safety of all parties. As medical professionals, it’s a responsibility and privilege to follow these regulations for the security and safety of everyone involved.
    Even professional athletes and other related figures must authorize any publication or use of their medical records. It’s important that all healthcare representatives follow this rule without exception.
    Interesting article. I would say that HIPAA laws are not absolute. For instance, as a Physical Education teacher, I absolutely have knowledge of what kids have bee allergies, diabetes and seizure conditions, as this knowledge is essential in preventing a possible tragedy.

    This situation is certainly different, as an athlete isn't employed directly by the fans and thus has no legal obligation to any of us. But HIPAA laws don't preclude teams from listing players on an injury report, which they are obligated to do according to NFL rules. And that's really all that's being asked for here- an honest explanation, not Gurley's life medical history.

    Leave a comment:


  • NJ Ramsfan1
    replied
    Originally posted by ManofGod View Post

    If you do not like what I post then you are free to simply ignore me, For such a long response, I must've hit a nerve. In addition I've been watching your post for years, this is not a one time even that has let to my comment. It would appear that you are simply culturally unaware to how your opinion may come across to current athletes.
    I am angered when the "exploitation" and "slavery" cards are played when talking about athletes who have tremendous privilege. It rings hollow. And while money and privilege in no way should mean athletes should bow and be subservient, they still have certain obligations since they rely on a viewing and paying public to ply their trade. This is what is being lost in this dialogue.

    And I'm curious as to "what other posts" I've made over the years that would suggest differently. I am not one who believes these guys should just "shut up and play", but I DO believe most athletes lack a complete understanding of why their words and actions are sometimes criticized.

    Leave a comment:


  • ManofGod
    replied
    Originally posted by NJ Ramsfan1 View Post

    If you want to have an intelligent discussion, I'm here. If you want to throw out childish slang and ignorant generalizations, take it somewhere else, because quite frankly I'm offended at what you said. You don't know me or what I'm all about- and safe to say as a coach and educator for 27 years I'll put my record up against you or anyone else concerning my view on athletes and on people. To suggest an expectation of sports stars whom we support with our hard earned money and loyalty to be honest is akin to displaying a "white slave owner" stance is both outrageous and offensive. And of course in doing so, you totally miss the point.

    It's obvious you simply skimmed my post(s) because you conveniently lost the thrust of what was said- which is that along with being in the public arena come certain obligations and responsibilities. To argue otherwise shows ignorance. Athletes ABSOLUTELY OWE the buying public the virtues of effort and honesty. Athletes DO NOT OWE US details on their private lives, finances, locker room happenings, personal relationships etc. You also totally disregarded my statement about "my understanding why personal pride and gamesmanship might preclude an athlete from fully revealing an injury". But the Super Bowl is over- and there's no reason to not be totally forthright about why Gurley was a total non-factor. To do so simply perpetuates rumor- and insults our intelligence.
    If you do not like what I post then you are free to simply ignore me, For such a long response, I must've hit a nerve. In addition I've been watching your post for years, this is not a one time even that has let to my comment. It would appear that you are simply culturally unaware to how your opinion may come across to current athletes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Curly Horns
    replied
    Personally, I don't feel as though I deserve to know. If they want to disclose then great. If they don't want to then that's fine. That's just me.

    I have a strong respect for other people's privacy and that's not to say others here do not have the same respect. It often seems that we now live in a society filled with expectations that nothing should be kept private.

    Anyways, since this is possibly a health issue concerning Gurley, one of the first things that came to mind was HIPAA. I found several articles two of which I have posted below.




    Athletes Do Not Leave Their HIPAA Rights At The Locker Room Door
    By Elizabeth Litten on July 21, 2015
    POSTED IN ARTICLES, PRIVACY & SECURITY
    HIPAA has made an unlikely appearance twice already this month in news reports involving famous athletes.

    Between the Pierre-Paul medical record tweet by ESPN reporter Adam Schefter earlier this month (discussed by my partner and fellow blogger Bill Maruca here) and the ticker-tape parade featuring confetti made of shredded (but apparently legible) medical information raining down on U.S. Women’s soccer team in New York City (reported by WFMY news here), it seems HIPAA breaches and athletes have had an uncanny affinity for one another this summer, particularly in New York City.

    Setting the attenuated coincidence of these events aside, the Pierre-Paul incident provides an opportunity to review when medical information that relates to one’s employment is protected under HIPAA and when it isn’t.

    In 2002, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the agency responsible for enforcing HIPAA, considered a comment to a proposed HIPAA regulation suggesting that “health information related to professional athletes should qualify as an employment record,” and, thus, not be considered protected health information under HIPAA. HHS was quite clear in responding that a professional athlete has the same HIPAA rights as any other individual:

    If this comment is suggesting that the records of professional athletes should be deemed “employment records” even when created or maintained by health care providers and health plan, the Department disagrees. No class of individuals should be singled out for reduced privacy.

    HHS refused to provide a definition of “employment record”, fearing that it might “lead to the misconception that certain types of information are never protected health information, and will put the focus incorrectly on the nature of the information rather than the reasons for which” the information was obtained.

    HHS went on to explain how and when protected health information might become “employment record” information:

    For example, drug screening test results will be protected health information when the provider administers the test to the employee, but will not be protected health information when, pursuant to the employee’s authorization, the test results are provided to the … employer and placed in the employee’s employment record.

    HHS further clarified that:

    … medical information needed for an employer to carry out its obligations under FMLA, ADA, and similar laws, as well as files or records related to occupational injury, disability insurance eligibility, sick leave requests and justifications, drug screening results, workplace medical surveillance, and fitness-for-duty tests of employees, may be part of the employment records maintained by … an employer.

    Going back to Pierre-Paul, the mere fact that his injury could affect his ability to perform as a professional athlete did not automatically turn the protected health information related to the injury (the medical record created by the hospital) into “employment records” exempt from HIPAA protection. It isn’t unless and until protected health information is disclosed to the employer pursuant to the individual’s authorization that it becomes an “employment record” no longer subject to HIPAA. Even if an individual’s disclosure of medical records is a condition of employment (apparently not the case in Pierre-Paul’s situation), it is the individual’s authorization that allows its disclosure, not the category or class of the individual.





    Handling HIPAA Rules In Sports: Why Athlete Privacy Matters

    jennacyprus
    April 18, 2016 976 Views

    HIPAA breaches are all too common, and the number of reported cases has grown significantly over the last decade. Most often associated with medical professionals and healthcare centers, these breaches can lead to serious legal issues, including medical negligence claims and professionals losing their licenses. However, it’s not only relegated to these areas. It can also play a role in sports when the media gets ahold of a major injury.

    Athletes Have HIPAA Rights Too

    HIPAA breaches are all too common, and the number of reported cases has grown significantly over the last decade. Most often associated with medical professionals and healthcare centers, these breaches can lead to serious legal issues, including medical negligence claims and professionals losing their licenses. However, it’s not only relegated to these areas. It can also play a role in sports when the media gets ahold of a major injury.

    Athletes Have HIPAA Rights Too

    When a major athlete gets hurt, it’s not uncommon for the media to know every detail of their prognosis and treatment. What’s less clear, however, is how much permission these athletes have given regarding the release of this information. Athletes don’t simply check their HIPAA rights at the locker room door, after all.

    HIPAA regulations should come into play when athletes undergo any kind of medical procedure, whether it’s a surgery or physical therapy. If a tennis player chooses to disclose the fact that she’s using rebounder nets as a part of her physical therapy, that’s her prerogative, but others don’t have the right to release the information for her, even if she’s famous.

    There have actually been several cases in which the medical records of major athletes have been shared via public means, and violated the patient’s rights. Most recently, ESPN reporter Adam Schefter tweeted the medical record of Jason Andrew Pierre-Paul, exposing private information that subjected the reporter to a lawsuit and ended in the firing of two hospital employees who leaked the records.

    After Pierre-Paul lost his finger and other parts of his right hand in a firework accident during his Independence Day celebration last year, he was rushed to Jackson Memorial Hospital for treatment. It wasn’t long before the press had a hold of his medical information and published it.

    In the legal aftermath that followed, Jackson Memorial Hospital portrayed a good example of how to handle the situation. They quickly published the following statement:

    “During the investigation of a breach that occurred in July 2015, Jackson Health System became a party to related litigation. It is our policy that we do not comment during pending litigation. That litigation has now been settled. As part of our investigation into the breach, it was discovered that two employees inappropriately accessed the patient’s health record. That finding resulted in the termination of both employees. Protecting the privacy of our patients is a top priority at Jackson Health System. Any time we have allegations of a breach, we immediately and thoroughly investigate.”

    Policies Protect Athlete Rights

    There have been discussions in the past about whether or not public figures’ health records should be made public; but in 2002, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reinforced the policy. “No class of individuals should be singled out for reduced privacy,” the statement said.

    There’ll always be certain privacy mandates that’ll need to be carried out according to HIPAA regulations to ensure the privacy and safety of all parties. As medical professionals, it’s a responsibility and privilege to follow these regulations for the security and safety of everyone involved.
    Even professional athletes and other related figures must authorize any publication or use of their medical records. It’s important that all healthcare representatives follow this rule without exception.

    Leave a comment:


  • r8rh8rmike
    replied
    Originally posted by ManofGod View Post
    So let me get this right, you are in the gym working out with him right, running sprints, taking hits? No sir, no you are not.You buy a ticket or turn on your t.v. to do one thing and that is to WATCH a guy play a game. So do what a consumer does and WATCH. If you do not want to watch then turn off the t.v., if you do not want to buy a ticket or a jersey DON'T! But do not act as if you dictate his career or that he owes YOU for HIS hard work. But again you guys are telling on yourselfs by your comments. The stance taken by the Rams in this instance is the same that the Patriots used for quite some time, and it was simply accepted as part of "the patriot way". What so many miss is that guys take cheap shots on their injured area(s) when said areas are highlighted/reported. Many pros & former pros have admitted this fact. If I am a player, I am not giving a team the slightest edge.
    Bottom line, without fans, Gurley has no career, and doesn't make millions of dollars. It's a pretty simple concept. If you work in the public arena, you're going to periodically have to answer to those that ultimately pay your salary. My guess is Gurley knows this, which is why he's never had a problem giving interviews and addressing issues.

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  • Nick
    Where in the World is Todd Gurley?
    by Nick
    Forgive my weak attempt at a Carmen Sandiego reference, but I think the question needs to be asked again and again until we have an answer.

    Through the regular season, Gurley averaged 18.2 rushes per game and four receptions per game. In the playoffs, he rushed the ball ten times a game on average and caught four passes in three contests.

    This offense is built through Gurley. The strength of the running game is what makes play action so effective. Finding ways to get the ball in Gurley's hands should be priority number one for anyone making decisions about this offense, yet it seems like after his injury, and more specifically after the Dallas playoff win, Gurley just disappeared from the gameplan.

    There are some people across the internet - I know because I've seen the responses in the Twitter feeds of those who cover the Rams - who are abandoning ship on Gurley. I think it's way too soon for that kind of overreaction. But it really does make you wonder, in the biggest game of his career, why Sean McVay didn't do more to make Gurley a focal point of the gameplan.

    The Rams insist he's completely healthy, and Gurley does as well. I wouldn't be surprised, though, to find out in a couple of weeks that he had some nagging injury that needs cleaned up over the offseason. Still, it would be rather baffling if that's the case after so much insistence to the contrary.

    It kind of makes me wonder if there's something else going on behind the scenes, some kind of personal issue that Gurley is going through and the Rams have been trying to help him by easing his workload or not putting too much on his plate. I have no evidence or anything to base this off of, aside from just the mere speculation that will occur when someone who normally is so heavily part of a gameplan gets left behind so strangely.

    Either way, the Rams need to spend this offseason looking in the mirror and figuring out why, when all the chips were on the table, they kept their stud workhorse on the sidelines as much as they did. Maybe Gurley just needs an offseason away from football to get back to his normal self or to recover from whatever ails him. Let's hope that's the case, and we're not looking at the symptoms of a bigger problem here, either for Gurley or McVay....
    -02-04-2019, 04:04 AM
  • Nick
    Rams facing this painful question: Are Todd Gurley’s best years behind him?
    by Nick
    Rams facing this painful question: Are Todd Gurley’s best years behind him?
    By Vincent Bonsignore
    Mar 3, 2019

    INDIANAPOLIS​ — There is finally​ some​ clarity​ on the condition​ of Todd Gurley’s​ left knee,​ and the​ news over the​ weekend painted​​ a gloomy picture for the Rams’ star running back.

    On Friday, John Breech of CBS Sports reported that the Rams might consider stem cell treatment for Gurley’s knee, which was surgically repaired in 2014 after an ACL tear during his junior year at Georgia. On Saturday, Jeff Howe of The Athletic reported that recent tests have revealed Gurley is dealing with arthritis in the knee.

    Both revelations cast doubt on the future of Gurley, who signed a four-year contract extension worth $60 million last summer that takes him through the 2023 season and guarantees him $45 million.

    With head coach Sean McVay talking about putting a plan in place to manage Gurley’s workload and general manager Les Snead pondering the potential need to add another running back alongside him, a dreaded question the Rams and their fans never wanted to contemplate is now absolutely valid.

    Are Gurley’s best years behind him?

    Since arthritis is a common occurrence in knees that have been surgically repaired, it is possible Gurley could be suffering from the condition. An orthopedic surgeon, speaking anonymously to The Athletic, said: “When you use the words arthritis in a knee that had an ACL back in college, that’s the connection. You’ve lost the alignment, and the tires are wearing out prematurely.”

    If that is indeed the case, it creates an ominous situation for Gurley based on multiple doctors consulted, including Dr. Jesse Morse of Florida Orthopedic Specialists.

    “Without personally examining him, my answers will obviously be very generalized, but unfortunately I believe Gurley has peaked and will not be able to repeat his record-breaking effectiveness,” Dr. Morse said. “He could possibly have one to two more years of elite top-five running back talent, but he will likely lose a step.”

    Publicly and privately, the Rams are not indicating anything more beyond the recent comments by McVay and Snead that Gurley was dealing with “wear and tear” issues late in the season.

    McVay said this week at the NFL Scouting Combine that surgery is not planned for Gurley. According to the doctors consulted by The Athletic, Gurley clearly has a condition that requires management rather than an injury that needs surgery.

    As far as stem cell treatment — which some doctors insist is a radical and not-yet-proven treatment that should be approached cautiously — Rams sources said no such course of action has been discussed within the organization.

    McVay and Snead have talked about putting a plan in place that will help keep Gurley...
    -03-04-2019, 06:17 AM
  • Nick
    PFT: Todd Gurley has yet to run with injured knee
    by Nick
    Todd Gurley has yet to run with injured knee
    Posted by Mike Florio on December 20, 2018, 9:32 PM EST

    Rams running back Todd Gurley has a knee injury, and there’s a chance he may not be able to play on Sunday.

    Gurley has yet to practice this week. Asked by reporters on Thursday whether he could play if the game were today, Gurley said, “That’s a tough question. I haven’t tried to run. So, yeah, that’s a tough question.”

    He nevertheless expressed optimism, despite the fact that he hasn’t yet tried to run.

    “I think I’ll be fine, man,” Gurley said. “Just taking it day-by-day recovering, resting, trying to feel better.”

    If he plays, it likely will happen without practice; he said he doesn’t plan on participating at all this week. He wants to play, obviously; however, he seems to recognize the chance that he won’t.

    “We’ve got a game to win,” Gurley said. “I’m pretty sure me being out there — if I can be out there — I would put this team in a good position to help them win. So why wouldn’t I be out there if I can play? In the situation that we are — we just lost two. We’re trying to get a first-round bye. That’s what we’re trying to do. We’re trying to win.”

    Coach Sean McVay has said he won’t risk Gurley’s availability for the postseason by playing him in the final two regular-season games, if he’s not healthy enough to play.

    He’s clearly not healthy enough to practice. At this point, he’s not even healthy enough to run.
    -12-21-2018, 08:43 AM
  • r8rh8rmike
    Rams RB Gurley says knee 'feeling pretty good'
    by r8rh8rmike
    Rams RB Gurley says knee 'feeling pretty good'

    3:26 PM PT
    Lindsey Thiry ESPN

    THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. -- Running back Todd Gurley reported Monday for the first day of the Los Angeles Rams' voluntary workout program prepared to answer numerous questions about the status of his left knee.

    "It's feeling pretty good," Gurley said. "Taking it day by day."

    Gurley said there was "not really" any discussion about the possibility of an offseason procedure on his knee, and that his immediate focus was on the present when asked if a long-term management plan was in place.

    "All I need to worry about is how I'm feeling right now," Gurley said. "I don't know how I'm going to be feeling six months from now. So like I said, just kind of keep working hard, doing what I've been doing these past couple of years."

    When asked if he was able to confirm reports that he had a degenerative knee or arthritis, Gurley avoided any such label.

    "I mean, all I can focus on is how I'm doing right now," Gurley said. "Feeling pretty good, like I said, taking it day by day and just trying to get better, get ready for the next season."

    Gurley's left knee, which was surgically repaired in 2014, kept him sidelined for Weeks 16 and 17, after he rushed for 1,251 yards and scored a league-best 21 touchdowns in 14 games.

    Gurley returned for the playoffs and rushed for 115 yards and a touchdown in a divisional-round win over the Dallas Cowboys.

    However, his performances in the NFC Championship Game and Super Bowl LIII led to continued speculation that his knee continued to cause discomfort.

    Against the New Orleans Saints in the conference title game, he gained only 13 total yards on five touches. And in a loss to the New England Patriots in Super Bowl LIII, he rushed for 35 yards on 10 carries.

    Rams coach Sean McVay said Monday that Gurley, who last July signed a four-year, $60 million extension, would remain a central part of the offense.

    "Todd has shown that he is capable of carrying the workload," McVay said of Gurley, who has rushed for more than 1,000 yards in consecutive seasons. "Todd is a guy that's been a focal point of this offense. He's going to continue to be."...
    1 week ago
  • RockinRam
    Gurley on Second NFL Season: 'Like a Nightmare'
    by RockinRam
    • By Chris Wesseling
    • Around the NFL Writer
    • Published: Jan. 24, 2017 at 02:53 p.m.
    • Updated: Jan. 24, 2017 at 03:05 p.m.

    After a successful debut campaign as the NFL's Offensive Rookie of the Year, Rams running back Todd Gurley suffered through a miserable second season.

    Mired in an inept Los Angeles attack, Gurley clearly regressed as a playmaker, finishing with the lowest yards-per-carry figure (3.2) of any back with 150 or more rushing attempts.

    In a Tuesday appearance on The Rich Eisen Show, Gurley was asked to categorize his 2016 season.

    "Like a nightmare. I still can't believe the season," Gurley said. "It was definitely a tough year, a learning experience for me. To be 4-12 this year? I don't want to feel that feeling again."
    Gurley made news in December, describing the Rams' attack as a "middle school offense" in the wake of back-to-back lopsided losses that led directly to the firing of coach Jeff Fisher.

    Provided a forum to explain that criticism, Gurley clarified that he was speaking strictly of the players rather than the coaching staff.

    "The week before, we played New England. I think we probably scored one touchdown and that was the last two minutes of the game," Gurley explained. "Then we go play Atlanta, and they probably put more points up on us on defense than we actually put up on offense."

    "It was frustrating. I kind of told it like it was, kind of how we looked. It was too many mental errors from everybody, including myself, just turning the ball over. You just can't have that."

    Gurley was gracious enough to let the coaching staff off the hook, but Fisher's offenses were dysfunctional for long stretches of his five-year tenure with the Rams.

    Erupting for more than 125 rushing yards in each of his first four NFL starts, Gurley drew lofty comparisons to Hall of Famers such as Gale Sayers and Eric Dickerson early in his rookie season.

    His rare talent was so obvious at the time that NFL Network analyst Brian Baldinger raved, "My mom could scout Todd Gurley."

    Since that torrid start to his career, however, Gurley has reached the century mark just once in 24 games. No other running back since the 1970 NFL-AFL merger has played all of his team's games and averaged as many carries per game as Gurley (17.4) without reaching 100 rushing yards at least once in a season, per NFL Research.

    The Rams have enlisted new head coach Sean McVay to pull No. 1 overall draft pick Jared Goff out of his rookie-year tailspin. Beyond that quarterback-whisperer responsibility, McVay will have to find a way to free Gurley from the bad habits he picked up behind an offensive line that is too often overwhelmed at the line of scrimmage.

    The talent is there. Can McVay and his staff unlock the potential in 2017?...
    -01-24-2017, 05:32 PM
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