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Judge Orders Goodell, Referees To Be Questioned Under Oath About Title Game No-Call

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  • Judge Orders Goodell, Referees To Be Questioned Under Oath About Title Game No-Call

    Louisiana judge orders Roger Goodell, referees to be questioned under oath about NFC title game no-call

    A New Orleans lawyer alleges fraud committed by NFL officials

    ​​​by Jared Dubin @jadubin5
    2 hrs ago • 1 min read

    Louisiana State Civil District Court Judge Nicole Sheppard of New Orleans has ordered NFL commissioner Roger Goodell and three officials from January's NFC title game between the Saints and Los Angeles Rams to be deposed regarding the infamous missed pass interference call that arguably swung the game in favor of the Rams.

    Attorney Antonio LeMon, who filed the suit alleging fraud was committed by the officials, said that he and the league will agree on a date for the depositions to take place, barring any appeal from the league, according to the Associated Press.

    Judge Sheppard had already previously ruled that LeMon's lawsuit could proceed where others had failed. Other suits were brought in or removed to federal court, but LeMon's has continued in state court. Per the Associated Press, LeMon has designed the suit to stay in state court by keeping the requested damages low ($75,000); he also stated Monday that he intends to donate any proceeds from the suit to former Saints star Steve Gleason's charity.

    LeMon also received favorable rulings from Judge Sheppard that will allow him to request documents from and question NFL officials. The suit is scheduling to have its next hearing in late August, with depositions currently set to be scheduled in September. Reached for comment by the Associated Press, an NFL spokesman declined to speak on the matter.

    Just in case you thought this controversy was over now that we're headed into an all new season, well, think again.

  • #2
    Will they be questioned under oath about the facemask no-call on Goff, or the pass interference no-call on Cooks?

    So absurd.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by r8rh8rmike View Post
      Will they be questioned under oath about the facemask no-call on Goff, or the pass interference no-call on Cooks?

      So absurd.
      Absolutely. The only positive I can see for the Rams is that this could be good bulletin board fodder for the Rams locker room in advance of the NO game. You mention 2 good referee misses v the Rams but I would add that the judge might wish to question Sean Payton why he endorsed Gregg Williams "bounty" payments for taking players out of games.

      Go Rams!

      Comment


      • #4
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        • #5
          Originally posted by R8rh8rmike View Post
          Will they be questioned under oath about the facemask no-call on Goff, or the pass interference no-call on Cooks?

          So absurd.

          Exactly.

          In the end, these specific penalties - for this particular game - would, in Referee jargon - offset each other. Worst case scenario. (^_^)

          Comment


          • #6
            LeMon has designed the suit to stay in state court
            Well, no poop, Sherlock! A New Orleans attorney files suit to be heard by a New Orleans judge! Might as well hold trial in the Superdome!
            The more things change, the more they stay the same.

            Comment


            • #7
              This will be a black-eye on the NFL no matter how it turns out. The refs either have to admit why they didn't call that penalty or admit they missed it.

              I did not see the play happen because the game started before church was over, and my devotion to God is way more important than a game, but I have seen multiple replays from both sides. Two things I saw that don't get airplay are 'a tipped pass' (video even had audio with the words being said) and OL holding x3 that didn't get called on that same play. There was even one video of the play that appears to show the ball was past the players before contact was made. Funny how that video isn't on an endless loop to show the other side. Do the refs get to answer questions with these scenarios as why they didn't call any penalties?


              gap

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by gap View Post
                This will be a black-eye on the NFL no matter how it turns out. The refs either have to admit why they didn't call that penalty or admit they missed it.

                I did not see the play happen because the game started before church was over, and my devotion to God is way more important than a game, but I have seen multiple replays from both sides. Two things I saw that don't get airplay are 'a tipped pass' (video even had audio with the words being said) and OL holding x3 that didn't get called on that same play. There was even one video of the play that appears to show the ball was past the players before contact was made. Funny how that video isn't on an endless loop to show the other side. Do the refs get to answer questions with these scenarios as why they didn't call any penalties?


                gap
                no on will remember this crap a week from now. its fake to begin with.
                the nfl decides who wins games, end of story.
                refs work for the nfl and do as told.
                the hit was seen by the world and not called on purpose. there was no mistake, no accident.. no faulty judgement.
                sports is entertainment and that was the wwe playoff moment for gossip and controversy.


                Comment


                • #9
                  This should be just embarrassing for all Aint fans

                  __________________________________________________________
                  Keeping the Rams Nation Talking

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    what does he hope to gain by it?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by clive View Post
                      what does he hope to gain by it?
                      My guess is to rationalize the charge that the Saints were robbed, which is absolutely baseless, and ridiculous when you take into account the game affecting plays that were NOT called on the Saints, and the fact that they had subsequent chances to win the game. Whiny, cry baby Saints fans want a court to make them feel better. I agree with Dez, this should be an embarrassment to saints fans.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It will be quite the dramatic moment in those depos when Goodell breaks down weeping and reiterates the unthinkable: NFL refs missed a call. As Mike notes, one of many that cut both ways. In every game.

                        At risk of getting too far ahead of things, the best way to shut down any further whining and nonsense from the crybabies in NO would be for the Rams to wipe them off the Coliseum field in week 2. The Saints will look like a pack of losers if they flop in that one, and will likely come to town loaded for bear. Their "Super Bowl", if you will. The Rams will have to match and exceed their energy.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by R8rh8rmike View Post

                          ...Absolutely baseless, and ridiculous when you take into account the game affecting plays that were NOT called on the Saints, and the fact that they had subsequent chances to win the game. Whiny, cry baby Saints fans want a court to make them feel better.

                          [Format mine]

                          That is exactly what oftentimes happens in outcomes of many a game, boxing match or most other sport events. One, two blows below the belt - however questionable they were - do not, should not necessarily spell out or define the way of victory. It can, however, measure the resiliency / toughness and smarts of an individual or a team to overcome the so called 'unfairness' of the "missed call", or otherwise demise.


                          Everyone and their cousin, every entity small or huge goes through such events. Again, the trick, the difference is how they react in terms of bouncing back to claim the presumably deserved win.


                          Below, a baffling situation that took the Rams out of a chance to make the playoffs in '68. We were quite a STRONG team from 1967 to early '70s, both offensively and defensively, playoff bound all of those years.

                          This one game in December of '68 against Chicago became a ton of hurt & pain that year, bottom line.

                          Bears 17 - Rams 16. I remember it well till this day.


                          -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          Officials’ mistake proved costly to Los Angeles Rams in 1968

                          The Los Angeles Times
                          By MIKE HISERMAN
                          SEP. 26, 2012, 12 AM


                          Mistakes aren't exclusive to replacement officials. They’re made every week during every NFL season, even by the full-time pros.

                          Occasionally, errors are made by even the best of the best — and once in a while it happens in a very important game.

                          It happened at the Coliseum in 1968 with a berth in the playoffs on the line. The Rams were playing the Chicago Bears, needing a win to set up a final-game-of-the-regular-season showdown against the Baltimore Colts for the Coastal Division championship. In those days, only the four division winners advanced to the postseason.

                          The Rams trailed by a point as they took over at their 36-yard line with 29 seconds left in regulation. Roman Gabriel quickly fired a pass to Jack Snow for a 32-yard gain and a first down, but the Rams needed to move closer to be within kicker Bruce Gossett’s field-goal range.

                          Gabriel tried to connect with Snow again, but his pass fell incomplete and, worse, lineman Charlie Cowan was called for holding — a loss of 21 yards because the infraction took place six yards behind the line of scrimmage.

                          The Rams should have had a first down at their 47, but the yard marker read second down, even though the penalty wiped out the previous play. Gabriel’s next three passes also fell incomplete, and the game officials awarded possession to Chicago with five seconds still on the clock.

                          The Rams had been given three downs after the penalty instead of four.

                          The next day, NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle took unprecedented action, suspending the entire officiating crew for the rest of the season — including lucrative playoff assignments.

                          Although he noted in a statement that the crew was “among the most competent in pro football,” Rozelle ruled that each of its six members were “equally responsible for keeping track of the downs.”

                          The referee was Norm Schacter, principal of Los Angeles High. He was the league’s highest-paid referee and had worked in three of the previous six NFL title games, and also the first Super Bowl.

                          “It’s presumed that the Rams would not have employed the same strategy if the down situation had been correct,” the late Mal Florence reported in The Times. “It’s possible that Gabriel, provided with a first down on his own 47, might have thrown successive short ‘out’ passes in order to get back within field-goal range again.”

                          Of course, the officials weren't the only ones who lost track. Rams coaches, focused on time slipping away, didn't notice they had lost a down.

                          So it’s entirely possible that Gabriel would have been left to heave a “Hail Mary” pass toward the end zone as time expired.

                          And what are the chances of that kind of play ever being successful?


                          -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


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                          We could have, should have made the playoffs that year after this dismal error by the officials in that game. We failed, we couldn't see their blunder nor did the entire crowd at the Coliseum - we were at home! - TV sportscasters, "et al". No one alerted to that particular lost opportunity.


                          So New Orleans, don't make it worse on yourselves. Just grin and bear it people.


                          And BTW, yes, I agree...

                          At risk of getting too far ahead of things, the best way to shut down any further whining and nonsense from the crybabies in N.O. would be for the Rams to wipe them off the Coliseum field in week 2.

                          -Seacone
                          Last edited by RealRam; 2 weeks ago. Reason: Format

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Right on, RealRam. Great post.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Watching the Vikings/Saints game, lots of penalties in favour of the home team. Refs are making sure they don't have cause to appear in court.

                              Comment

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