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  • Report: Aaron Kromer no longer on Rams coaching staff

    Cameron DaSilva
    February 18, 2021 7:24 pm


    The Los Angeles Rams coaching staff is undergoing a lot of changes this offseason. According to Gary Klein of the LA Times, Aaron Kromer is no longer with the team.

    Kromer has been the Rams’ offensive line coach since 2017 when Sean McVay was hired as the head coach. Kromer has also been the run game coordinator since 2018.

    Kromer is the seventh coach to leave McVay’s staff this offseason, with Brandon Staley, Joe Barry and Aubrey Pleasant among the others. McVay will now need to find a new O-line coach and decide what to do about the run game coordinator position. Shane Waldron, the team’s pass game coordinator, left to join the Seahawks as their OC.

    Kevin O’Connell remains on the staff as the offensive coordinator, so it’s possible McVay won’t hire run and pass game coordinators.

  • #2
    @Jim_EverettFeb 9
    Of all the coaches that have departed this past & previous years from the@RamsNFL(McVay’s staff), thank heaven that offensive line coach Aaron Kromer stays put!! Dude teaches! Gets the Biggins ready to ball! OLGuru#Respect
    I guess he didn't get them ready to ball well enough, especially in the red zone. Interesting that reports are he and the Rams "mutually parted ways". This is interesting too:

    The move was first reported by the New York Daily News, which said Giants assistant offensive line coach Ben Wilkerson interviewed with the Rams.
    I'm not sure I get all this reported movement with regard to the OL. I thought Goff was the problem.

    Comment


    • #3
      This is nuts.

      I wonder if the common element is promotion/more pay elsewhere or not meeting McVays expectations. Whatever it is, it makes getting ready for 2021 more complex.
      “Oh, 100 percent,” Donald said. “I feel like the words, ‘Thank you,’ ain’t enough. You’ve got to show it... Instead of saying thank you — show it.”

      Comment


      • #4
        This suggests to me that the way the Goff thing was dealt with didn't sit well with some people in the organization.

        Personally, I thought it was badly handled, vindictive and counter-productive in terms of driving down Goff's value. Boy-wonder may have a nasty streak.

        If it wins a SB, we will forgive and forget, but the Rams have given up substantial draft capital for a 33 year old QB who hasn't won a playoff game and they have thrown two guys under the bus incurring huge cap penalties.

        For me, this is a 'prove it' season for McVay.

        He now has no excuses.

        Deep playoff run is the least we can expect.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Fat Pang View Post
          This suggests to me that the way the Goff thing was dealt with didn't sit well with some people in the organization.

          Personally, I thought it was badly handled, vindictive and counter-productive in terms of driving down Goff's value. Boy-wonder may have a nasty streak.

          If it wins a SB, we will forgive and forget, but the Rams have given up substantial draft capital for a 33 year old QB who hasn't won a playoff game and they have thrown two guys under the bus incurring huge cap penalties.

          For me, this is a 'prove it' season for McVay.

          He now has no excuses.

          Deep playoff run is the least we can expect.
          Agreed. The Rams got to the Wild Card, Divisional Round, and Super Bowl with Goff. Trading the farm - and Goff - for Stafford basically says anything short of a Super Bowl win is a disappointment. If fans thought the Rams were in "win now" mode before, it doesn't hold a candle to 2021.

          I do believe that, when it comes to new coaching hires, the team likes to try and be ahead of the curve and will poach guys from respected coach's staff. We've seen it with LaFleur and Taylor. But I do wonder if there is something to be said about the number of coaches that have left this staff since the Super Bowl run, and what that says about McVay as a leader. Sean is developing a bit of a reputation when it comes to his star players of jettisoning them when he thinks they've served their purpose, and maybe that extends to the coaching staff as well.

          There's an argument to be made in favor of this with the Rams pretty consistently contending for the playoffs under McVay, but it seems like a long way from the "we not me" mantra that was so heavily referenced in the early years.

          Comment


          • #6
            If it continues to work we better get used to this happening. If it does not then we will be looking at a new HC.

            I am not complaining here as it looks like the correct direction to me.

            Just remember that the word on the street is the cap is getting cut down.

            __________________________________________________________
            Keeping the Rams Nation Talking

            Comment


            • #7
              I really don't understand all the backlash towards McVay, with the movement of coaches, especially since he gave them the opportunity. The majority, that have moved on, were offered better positions with other teams. Sure it sucks, and I knew it was coming, but on face value, I don't see it being McVay's fault.

              I think most fans would agree that there were big problems with the offense. It's McVay's job to address those problems. When it comes to a team sport, I think there are always multiple problems. I don't think it's ever just "one guy"

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Curly Horns View Post
                I really don't understand all the backlash towards McVay, with the movement of coaches, especially since he gave them the opportunity. The majority, that have moved on, were offered better positions with other teams. Sure it sucks, and I knew it was coming, but on face value, I don't see it being McVay's fault.

                I think most fans would agree that there were big problems with the offense. It's McVay's job to address those problems. When it comes to a team sport, I think there are always multiple problems. I don't think it's ever just "one guy"
                I agree with you, Curly. Several things to point out here:

                One, Sean McVay is the youngest head coach in the NFL. There is no room for growth here at the moment if you're an assistant coach, therefore the turnover we're seeing is greater than with other organizations and to me, is not surprising. This is the price you pay when you're successful. Several guys have gotten promotions elsewhere and there has also been a retirement or two the past two years. I soundly reject the notion that this movement is somehow because McVay is "tough to work for". Nonsense. We've seen plenty of hard-assed head coaches retain staff year after year, non more notable than Bill Belichick.

                Two, From what I've read, Kromer isn't looking for another coaching job. And his son is staying with the team in his current role, which tells me that it's not a "McVay thing". That said, if one feels the O-line wasn't great last year, why would one be upset the O-line coach is leaving?

                Three, the Rams are in a big state of flux offensively. I applaud McVay for making what he and the organization feels are the necessary moves to improve the unit. Whether or not they're the right ones will be determined soon enough.

                And finally, Goff is gone. We turn the page. There's no sense wondering "what if" or trying to justify a lack of personal growth at the position. It's been shown that the O-line was far from terrible last year, Goff regressed, turned the ball over too much and didn't show adequate improvement at correcting his weaknesses. He was also making a crippling salary not commensurate with his production. Those are the reasons he's no longer here. I do agree it should've been handled a bit better in terms of the non-committal attitudes expressed by McVay and Snead prior to the deal.

                Comment


                • #9
                  To me this is a combination of the way the NFL operates these days and Sean McVay being a micro-manager as Rockin' Ram pointed out a few weeks ago. Look at the fast exit of Doug Pederson from the Eagles 3 short years after winning a Super Bowl. Players are being traded or cut loose at an amazing rate due to a flawed salary cap process and an emergence of young players who provide a different style of play. Loyalty is a lost commodity.

                  The Rams are under immense pressure to win a SB given the contracts handed out to Donald and Ramsey and the price paid for Ramsey and Stafford. When you make the change the Rams have made at the QB spot, it makes sense to adopt a new coaching staff who bring a new outlook. McVay will execute a new varied offense with Stafford which wasn't possible with Goff. Don't forget there are changes happening with the entire off-season which impacts how younger players will develop.

                  Bottom line, McVay isn't an easy person to work under and results for the Rams are paramount. Its not simply Goff, its inconsistent play week to week and losing a game to a winless team in the closing weeks of the season that force the organization to look at itself and consider reshuffling the deck. Not easy, but sometimes essential.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by isaacbruce4ever View Post
                    This is nuts.

                    I wonder if the common element is promotion/more pay elsewhere or not meeting McVays expectations. Whatever it is, it makes getting ready for 2021 more complex.
                    Agreed. All these coaching changes make things much more complicated and challenging. Until I saw this, I didn't realize the extent of the changes:

                    Rich Hammond@Rich_Hammond·
                    20h
                    The Rams had 18 assistant coaches on their staff in the Super Bowl season two years ago. Now, 13 of them are gone. Eight left on their own for other jobs. Four were let go. One was, um, *checks notes* mutual.

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Originally posted by NJ Ramsfan1 View Post
                      Two, From what I've read, Kromer isn't looking for another coaching job. And his son is staying with the team in his current role, which tells me that it's not a "McVay thing". That said, if one feels the O-line wasn't great last year, why would one be upset the O-line coach is leaving?
                      Good Points, and FWIW, as of today, Wade's son Wes Phillips is still on the coaching staff.




                      Originally posted by mde8352gorams View Post
                      Sean McVay being a micro-manager as Rockin' Ram pointed out a few weeks ago.

                      Bottom line, McVay isn't an easy person to work under
                      I remember the Rockin' post and I thought it was just his overstated opinion?

                      And I'm curious as to why you say McVay isn't easy to work for? In other words - How do you know this?

                      I see the exact opposite of a difficult to work for micro-manger. I think Staley is the perfect example. McVay knows what he wants and he knows what works in this league. He goes out and hires a guy and makes him a first time DC and turns him loose.
                      Hard to work for - Micro-manager? Maybe he is but I don't see it.



                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Curly Horns View Post
                        Good Points, and FWIW, as of today, Wade's son Wes Phillips is still on the coaching staff.





                        I remember the Rockin' post and I thought it was just his overstated opinion?

                        And I'm curious as to why you say McVay isn't easy to work for? In other words - How do you know this?

                        I see the exact opposite of a difficult to work for micro-manger. I think Staley is the perfect example. McVay knows what he wants and he knows what works in this league. He goes out and hires a guy and makes him a first time DC and turns him loose.
                        Hard to work for - Micro-manager? Maybe he is but I don't see it.


                        I agree- and I don't know why this sentiment exists. I've read no quotes from past coaches claiming McVay is an impossible SOB to work for, no real derogatory comments from ex-players suggesting McVay mistreated them and nothing from anyone indicating Mcvay is a bad dude. Seems as if some people are simply drawing the conclusion that if coaches are leaving that it must be because of McVay, which is baseless as well as unfair.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Curly Horns View Post
                          Good Points, and FWIW, as of today, Wade's son Wes Phillips is still on the coaching staff.





                          I remember the Rockin' post and I thought it was just his overstated opinion?

                          And I'm curious as to why you say McVay isn't easy to work for? In other words - How do you know this?

                          I see the exact opposite of a difficult to work for micro-manger. I think Staley is the perfect example. McVay knows what he wants and he knows what works in this league. He goes out and hires a guy and makes him a first time DC and turns him loose.
                          Hard to work for - Micro-manager? Maybe he is but I don't see it.


                          The reason I say McVay may not be an easy person to work for is that he is tireless in crafting the offense. That is a good thing at the end but the process could be burdensome to those who may not see it the same. If you are hired to do a job, would you want your manager directing you each step of the way or would you prefer some latitude in doing what you think is the best outcome. I have managed people and found giving them space to do their job brings out more job satisfaction for them and frequently better results.

                          I don't think the Staley example holds as McVay allows the DC to construct a defensive scheme best for the roster skills.

                          I'm not making McVay out to be a bad coach or a bad person, I'm simply saying he is demanding of his staff, which is good, but if he directs too much that may make it hard for those staffers to function. Do I know this for a fact, of course not. But I do think there is a lot of pressure on the Rams coaching staff and Front Office to produce better results than this past season and that can cause friction.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mde8352gorams View Post
                            The reason I say McVay may not be an easy person to work for is that he is tireless in crafting the offense. That is a good thing at the end but the process could be burdensome to those who may not see it the same. If you are hired to do a job, would you want your manager directing you each step of the way or would you prefer some latitude in doing what you think is the best outcome. I have managed people and found giving them space to do their job brings out more job satisfaction for them and frequently better results.

                            I don't think the Staley example holds as McVay allows the DC to construct a defensive scheme best for the roster skills.

                            I'm not making McVay out to be a bad coach or a bad person, I'm simply saying he is demanding of his staff, which is good, but if he directs too much that may make it hard for those staffers to function. Do I know this for a fact, of course not. But I do think there is a lot of pressure on the Rams coaching staff and Front Office to produce better results than this past season and that can cause friction.
                            Good points. I actually like the fact that McVay is relentless in his pursuit of winning, but there is a limit where you push things too far. I read something that suggested Kromer might have reached a point where he simply got burned out by McVay's intense methods and needed to step away from coaching. That sounds plausible to me.

                            IMO, McVay needs to make sure his approach to coaching doesn't create diminishing returns.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by r8rh8rmike View Post

                              I read something that suggested Kromer might have reached a point where he simply got burned out by McVay's intense methods and needed to step away from coaching. That sounds plausible to me.
                              That makes a lot of sense. I'm also thinking a change from Kromer, who did a fine job and deserves kudos, is a signal that the O-Line may start seeing some changes in the upcoming draft and FA period. Many of us have talked about the need for a Center, but there are other spots that will need attention. Among them may be the LT spot if we release Whitworth or he decides to hang it up. The RT spot could also be changing if Havenstein is traded.

                              $25m over the cap is not easily resolved.

                              Comment

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